Upstate New York Poison Control Center

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Poisonings from the liquid that is used in electronic cigarettes is on the rise in New York state. They come in flavors like bubble gum, mint chip and grape, but only one swallow of liquid nicotine can make a child very, very ill, according to Michelle Caliva, head of the Upstate New York Poison Center.

"E-cigarettes contain nicotine, and nicotine is toxic to children," Caliva said. "Whether it’s in the e-cigarette or a cigarette. If they ingest enough of it, they’re going to get sick."

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

The Upstate New York Poison Center wants New Yorkers to stay safe this holiday season. They've provided a list of things that can turn a happy holiday into tragedy.

Some things on the list remain after the holidays are long gone, like food safety. Other listed items are seen only during the holiday, like toxic plants- think mistletoe and holly berries. There are also items that can cause choking in young children.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer is firing another salvo in the war against prescription drug abuse. He's proposing that the Drug Enforcement Administration ease restrictions that make it harder for pharmacies to let people bring in controlled substances for disposal.

It's a problem that's getting worse in upstate New York, according to Michelle Caliva, director of the Upstate Poison Control Center. She's looked at the number of calls involving abuse of prescription pain killers over the last decade.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

The Upstate New York Poison Center wants to make sure parents are giving their children the proper doses of medicine.

A recent study shows that 40 percent of parents are giving their child the wrong amount of medicine, something that can lead to a possible overdose. The reason? They are using a teaspoon out of the kitchen drawer as a measuring tool, instead of a calibrated medicine spoon, according to Upstate Poison Center Communication Director Gail Banach.

Now that the abuse of the designer drug bath salts seems to be easing, scientists are warning of a new chemical cocktail. The drug called "smiles" has started making an appearance in upstate New York.

Raquel Baranow / Flickr

The abuse of the designer drug called "bath salts" came of age this summer, with violent episodes from abusers reported by police and medical professionals across central New York.

Some authorities are worried about what happens next, when universities and schools go back into session.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

The war on bath salts in New York state has some new tools.  Newly announced state Department of Health regulations mean tougher penalties and more local involvement in prosecuting those who sell or possess the substances.

The misuse of the synthetic drug known as "bath salts" continues to plague upstate New York. A community forum on bath salts last week aimed to unite the people who deal with the effects of the drug, and come away with a plan to fight it.

There's a high level of anxiety among emergency responders in central New York when it comes to dealing with users of of the designer drugs known as bath salts.  That's why the Upstate New York Poison Center is sponsoring a forum Friday with experts to explain what a bath salts user does, and why.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

The misuse of the designer drug called bath salts continues to be in the news as the number of complaints about the drug is on the rise.

The death of a Munnsville woman is the latest central New York case involving the suspected use of the man-made drugs.

In all of 2011, there were 118 calls to the Upstate Poison Control Center about bath salts. This year there have been 141 so far.