vaccinations

This week: a story of how the flu can be deadly

Dec 10, 2014

Joseph Marotta was a healthy kindergartner when he contracted, and died from, the H1N1 flu. Today his parents advocate for influenza vaccination through the organization, Families Fighting Flu. Hear their story, this week.

Also this week: Dr. Lorena Gonzalez talks about varicose veins and a treatment called sclerotherapy, plus how to eat healthy during the holiday season.

Getting a flu vaccination is an important way to protect yourself from getting influenza, says Dr. Jana Shaw, an infectious disease expert at Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital.

In this week’s show, she explains why almost everyone over the age of six months is recommended to be vaccinated each year. Influenza can cause a severe illness which is easily spread from person to person and can be deadly.

Daniel Paquet / Flickr

It's that time of year when experts recommend getting a flu shot, but many central New Yorkers aren't getting that message.

A larger percentage of central New Yorkers get vaccine preventable diseases like the flu than in any other part of upstate New York, according to state Health Department numbers compiled by Excellus BlueCross BlueShield. Regional President Dr. Arthur Vercillo says that mirrors the number of people getting flu shots.

Ensuring a healthy vacation

Jun 15, 2014
Nick Kenrick / Flickr

As summer approaches and the weather improves, many of us begin to make plans for international travel.  Part of the allure of vacationing in other countries is the opportunity it provides us with to experience other cultures and enjoy the sights and smells of new places.  In order to ensure that you are able to do such things, it is important to take some necessary health precautions both before stepping on the plane and after reaching your destination.

This week on "Take Care," Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky describes the various ways in which we can prevent illness while abroad.  Kozarsky is a professor of medicine at Emory University as well as director of TravelWell, a clinic for international travelers.  She is also a consultant on travelers’ health with the CDC.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Kozarsky.

brownpau / flickr

Imagine getting a skin rash so painful that it compares to the intensity of pain associated with childbirth and kidney stones. The Center for Disease Control says that shingles can cause this kind of pain, and that one in three Americans will get it in their lifetime. Why exactly does shingles cause this kind of pain, and what is being done to prevent and treat it?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Pritish Tosh discusses the skin rash known as shingles. Dr. Tosh is assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic where he has collaborated with the Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development. He’s a leading expert on emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Tosh.

Credit USACE Europe District / via Flickr

Onondaga County Health Commissioner Dr. Cynthia Morrow said there are signs that the flu season is upon us. Morrow said there is one laboratory confirmed case of the flu in Onondaga County, and she's hearing reports from doctors offices about unconfirmed cases.  

Morrow said it's a good time for central New Yorkers to get their flu vaccine. She also said this year's vaccine may offer more protection than those in the past, which targeted three flu strains.

itsv / Flickr

Fall brings many great things—the leaves begin to change color, apples are ripe for the picking — but on the other end of the spectrum, fall also brings something that nobody looks forward to — flu season. A simple flu shot, which is easy to get, may equip people with all the immunity tools they need to fight off the flu. But surprisingly, the majority of people don’t take advantage of it.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Joseph Bresee discusses how the flu shot works and why people should get it. Dr. Bresee is the chief of the Epidemiology and Prevention Branch at the Centers for Disease Control, and helps create the yearly vaccine he believes more people should be receiving.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Joseph Bresee.

paulswansen / Flickr

Every year at this time, public health officials encourage Americans to get a flu vaccine, but the majority of people choose not to have a flu shot. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Joseph Bresee of the Centers for Disease Control about how the vaccine works to prevent the flu, and why the CDC recommends it.

Kate O'Connell/Innovation Trail

The number of parents opting out of having their kids vaccinated against whooping cough, also known as pertussis, is on the rise, according to a recent report. This is resulting in an increase in whooping cough cases statewide.

In 2012, New York state saw the highest number of whooping cough cases in decades, with more than 3,000 cases confirmed statewide.

Vaccinations for adults

Jun 28, 2013

Most parents are very aware that public health officials recommend certain vaccines for their children. But many adults have no idea what immunizations and booster shots they should be getting themselves. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," spoke with Dr. Carolyn Bridges of the Centers for Disease Control about vaccines for adults, particularly seniors.

Lorraine Rapp: Would you explain how vaccines work and what actually takes place in the body?