vaccines

NIAID / Flickr

You do everything you can to protect your children and this includes vaccinating against any illness they might encounter. Most states mandate that your child gets the meningitis ACWY vaccine. While this will protect your child against most strands of meningitis, it doesn’t account for bacterial meningitis or meningitis B.

Patti Wukovits, a registered nurse, thought she had her daughter covered when she received the vaccine mandated by New York state law. Wukovits’ daughter Kimberly came home from school with common symptoms of the flu, the next day she was admitted to the hospital for meningitis B. Kimberly passed away three days before her high school graduation. Patti established the Kimberly Coffey Foundation in her honor.

Joining us is Patti Wukovits and Dr. Allan Tunkel, associate dean for medical education at the Warren Alpert School of Brown University, to discuss not only Kimberly’s story, but the effects this disease can have on the young adult population.

This week: shingles, meningitis, eye research

Dec 8, 2016

People who had chicken pox or the chicken pox vaccine as children can undergo a reactivation of that disease’s virus in adulthood and wind up with shingles.

Researching ways to prevent and treat shingles, which brings a rash and possibly debilitating nerve pain, is the work of Jennifer Moffat, an associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Upstate University Hosptial. She describes how shingles, most common in adults over 50, can affect people with weakened immune systems.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Onondaga County Executive Joanie Mahoney rolled up her sleeve this week, not to work, but to show central New Yorkers how easy it is to get a flu shot.

"This took me less than a minute, and if you get the flu, you are down for a couple days and you’re making everybody around you sick,” Mahoney said. “It is a much better use of your time to take one minute and get your flu shot.”

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Health officials in central New York this week have announced that three people in Onondaga County and one in Oneida County have tested positive for the Zika virus. Officials say all four people contracted the virus while traveling outside the country, none were hospitalized, and there is no risk to the public. 

Upstate University Hospital

Researchers from Upstate University Hospital are testing a vaccine that could prevent a common respiratory virus among newborns.

Respiratory syncytial virus, better known as RSV, is the most common reason newborns end up in the hospital. It’s a very contagious respiratory virus that’s everywhere, and for most children, it plays out as a common cold. But for infants less than two months old it can be life threatening.

NIAID / Flickr

New rules for school vaccines in New York take effect September 1. The updates impact students entering kindergarten through seventh grade.

The major change is that kindergarteners need to have all their shots done before they start school. Previously, they could be part-way through the set of vaccines for four- to six-year-olds and still go to class.

The update also changes requirements for three vaccines that older kids get. It brings New York in line with federal recommendations from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Novartis AG / Flickr

 

At least 25,000 upstate New York school children are not fully vaccinated against communicable diseases. So New York doctors have been using social media campaigns to spread facts about vaccination.

Health professionals from across the country have been creating a so-called twitter storm of information about the measles vaccine using the hashtag #measlestruth.

Elizabeth Murray is a pediatrician at the University of Rochester Medical Center explains why she participated.

Some rights reserved by Samantha Celera

  After a few weeks of leveling off, flu cases in central New York have seen another spike.

Now in the heart of influenza season, Onondaga County health officials’ weekly total of reported cases was the highest of the season, so far. That's in contrast to statewide numbers, where reported cases declined five percent last week.  The county documented 316 cases for the week ending Jan. 31. That’s after four weeks of reported cases between two and three hundred.

Good hygiene is the best defense against enterovirus

Sep 15, 2014
Ben Nolan

The New York State Health Department has confirmed enterovirus 68 came to New York state last week, with more than a dozen children diagnosed with the illness in the Capitol Region and central New York. Health experts are telling parents the best defense against the virus is to make sure kids practice good hygiene.

Three children with asthma contracted the highly contagious respiratory virus and were admitted to Golisano Children’s Hospital in Syracuse. The virus made it very difficult for them to breath.

It's one of the most painful syndromes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say one in three Americans will get it eventually and those over 60 should be vaccinated. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Pritish Tosh, assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic,  about shingles and how to prevent it.

Lorraine Rapp: Let’s start at the beginning so we have a full understanding.  Exactly what is shingles?

itsv / Flickr

Fall brings many great things—the leaves begin to change color, apples are ripe for the picking — but on the other end of the spectrum, fall also brings something that nobody looks forward to — flu season. A simple flu shot, which is easy to get, may equip people with all the immunity tools they need to fight off the flu. But surprisingly, the majority of people don’t take advantage of it.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Joseph Bresee discusses how the flu shot works and why people should get it. Dr. Bresee is the chief of the Epidemiology and Prevention Branch at the Centers for Disease Control, and helps create the yearly vaccine he believes more people should be receiving.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Joseph Bresee.

paulswansen / Flickr

Every year at this time, public health officials encourage Americans to get a flu vaccine, but the majority of people choose not to have a flu shot. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Joseph Bresee of the Centers for Disease Control about how the vaccine works to prevent the flu, and why the CDC recommends it.

Neil McIntosh/Flickr

The United States Department of Agriculture continues to take steps toward lessening the number of rabies cases in New York state. Earlier this summer, edible plastic blister packs of a new vaccine, which has a marshmallow flavor and is a little larger than the size of a quarter, were dropped by airplane and by hand throughout northern New York and parts of four other states.

Lance McCord / Flickr

The flu is making an early appearance across upstate New York this fall, from the North Country through the Mohawk Valley. With the holiday season approaching, experts say it becomes more important than ever to take precautions.

Whooping Cough cases on the rise in New York state

Jul 30, 2012

The Centers for Disease Control is encouraging everyone to make sure they are vaccinated against pertussis -- commonly known as whooping cough. The CDC says New Yorkers in particular need to be protected against the disease.