Washington Redskins

Keith Allison / Flickr

The Oneida Indian Nation and the Change the Mascot campaign have spent more than a year putting public pressure on the Washington D.C. football franchise to drop its nickname, the Redskins. They say it’s offensive.

Change the Mascot is continuing its push on Washington’s pro football team to change its name by reaching out to owners of all the NFL teams and taking action in Congress.

Half the U.S. Senate and a growing chorus of newspapers and public officials have chimed in too, but so far the team itself has refused to budge.

Keith Allison / via Flickr

The U.S. Patent Office has canceled the trademark of the Washington Redskins professional football team, ruling that it is offensive to Native Americans. 

It was efforts from the Oneida Indian Nation that put the name back in the spotlight.

The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board ruled Wednesday the Redskins nickname is "disparaging of Native Americans" and will no longer be protected. Patent law disallows the use of offensive names as trademarks.

Keith Allison / via Flickr

A group of New York state lawmakers are joining a growing national push for the pro football team the Washington Redskins to change its name.

The group plans to introduce a resolution in the state legislature denouncing the football team's use of the word "redskin" and urging team owner Daniel Snyder to pick a new name.

"The word is absolutely offensive to the Native American community and beyond," said Democratic Assemblyman Keith Wright, noting names like New York Giants and Jets are not offensive, except maybe to broken down jet engines.

Keith Allison / Flickr

The Oneida Indian Nation in upstate New York supports the creation of a new foundation by Washington D.C.'s professional football team, though it says it's not a solution.

Keith Allison / via Flickr

An effort led by the Oneida Indian Nation to have Washington D.C.'s professional football team change its name has gained more support from members of Congress.

U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., and Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., sent a letter Monday to NFL Commissioner Rodger Goodell urging the league to take a stand for the Washington Redskins to change its team name.

Keith Allison / Flickr

While the debate continues between the Oneida Indian Nation and the Washington Redskins regarding the team's name and mascot, in upstate New York, several institutions faced similar decisions more than a decade ago and did change their names.

Christina Alexander was the president of the sophomore class at Sherburne-Earlville Central School in rural Chenango County when the student body decided to retire its Indian mascot, while leaving the team's name - the Marauders -- unchanged.

Keith Allison / via Flickr

A poll conducted by the Oneida Indian Nation has found that a majority of Washington D.C. residents wouldn't be bothered if the city's professional football team changed its name.

The poll, released Wednesday, finds 55 percent of residents say it would make no difference if the Washington Redskins went by a different mascot. A quarter of those surveyed said they would be less of a fan, but 18 percent said they would be more.