In this archived broadcast from August 9, 1990, John Weeks talks about how birds and sunflowers interconnect. He also talks about the dynamics of sunflowers and what they provide to our lives. He talks about different type of sunflowers and what makes them unique.

In this archived broadcast from July 20, 1990, John Weeks talks about the development of butterflies and their purpose in wild life. He talks about a trip he took to Georgia and went to the butterfly house at Callaway Gardens. He also talks about the birth of butterflies and goes into details about the things he saw at the butterfly house. Weeks says that when looking at butterflies you will experience unexpected rewards.

How is the Syracuse region doing with the vitality of its wildlife and the health of its outdoor sports industries?  Has the winter had an impact?  And what can be done about the city's growing problem with deer?  On this week's episode of the Campbell Conversations, host Grant Reeher explores those questions with David Figura, the outdoors writer for The Post-Standard and syracuse.com.  They also discuss life for sportspersons post-SAFE Act, and Figura's new book about men dealing with middle age, 

Storms and Wildlife

Dec 17, 2013

John Weeks tells us about the signs of winter we can find so early on. Sitting at the shore on Lake Ontario he is able to define trends with only one week of winter to go by. Wildlife is remarkably good at giving signs of the weather that will soon approach and John Weeks discusses them.

This episode of Nature of Things was originally aired December 23rd, 1990.

John Weeks looks back on an old Nature of Things program where he reviewed an old past time he calls cruising for wildlife. He's been cruising for wildlife for the past 50 years and talks about the number of kills he found while on the road. He was so interested that he was able to find out the reason for the casualty by observing the animal. Though it may sound gruesome it was yet very educational and he takes us down the evolution of that journey.

This episode was originally aired October 25th, 1991.

John Weeks recalls his trip to Skaneateles Lake. He describes to us what the lake looks like and the troubles he endured during this venture. He tells us about the mountains he climbed and the magnificent red and white oaks he saw while trying to his way back until a motorist rescued them and returned them to the doorstep they started at.

This episode of Nature of Things was originally aired on November 8th, 1991.

The Legend & Audubon

Oct 29, 2013

John Weeks discusses his reaction to an article in The National Inquirer about Audubon. The article talks about pioneer Audubon killing thousands of birds for sport. Many were shocked by this startling revelation but because Weeks has read portions of Audubon’s diaries in the past he was not surprised at all. It is hard to put ourselves in the lives of a pioneer during hunting season in the 1780s. Living in an era where hunting skill was vital to successful living Audubon’s actions were typical of his day though.

John Weeks discusses the commonality of the red tail hawk and the open territory to hunt for these birds in the wild. His continues to talk about his personal observation of the red tail and hunting for them.

This episode was originally aired on September 16th, 1988

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

The story of Onondaga Lake, once called the most polluted lake in the nation, will be told in a major interactive exhibit at the New York State Fair this year.

"We no longer have to look at it and be embarrassed, or discuss what we are going to do. Now we can look back at where we have been and where we are going," said Onondaga County Deputy Executive Matt Millea.

John Weeks goes on a spring time journey. He takes us on a tour to the country side and examines wildlife in his favorite areas.

John Weeks explains the value of plants to Wildlife and how to attract wildlife to your environment.

Roadkill + technology = new app to track wildlife

Dec 4, 2012
Sarah Harris / Innovation Trail

We’ve all seen or experienced it – unfortunate wildlife dashes in front of a car at just the wrong time - and its remains splatter across the road. But Danielle Garneau, a wildlife ecologist at SUNY Plattsburgh, says the roadkill we’re likely to see on roads can teach us a lot. She’s using a new smartphone app for citizen scientists.

Wildlife ecologist Danielle Garneau is making a habit of tracking down roadkill. She actually seeks it out, hunting for clues about larger ecological trends. Garneau records it all on a free smartphone app, EpiCollect.

Standing by the side of the road in upstate New York, phone in hand, Garneau peers down at a dead, bloody and smelly skunk.

More than 200 zoo keepers from around the country descended on the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse this week for the 39th annual conference of the Association of Zookeepers.

John Weeks reminisces on his early life in the countryside of central New York. Since childhood, Weeks has studied nature. He recounts the plants and wildlife that left a lasting impression on him early in life.

Originally aired on July 22, 1988.

The Red Fox

Jul 9, 2012

John Weeks dispels the myths surrounding foxes. These small mammals are not nearly as sly or cruel as Aesop's Fables would lead you to believe. Weeks discusses the curiosity and beauty of foxes. Not only are these animals exciting to observe but they also fulfill a crucial role in their ecosystem.

Originally aired on July 8, 1988.

Powerline Bird Watching

Jun 20, 2012

John Weeks explains that keeping an eye out for birds while driving can be both relaxing and informative. The power lines bordering highways provide an abundance of opportunities to sight beautiful birds. Bird watching in the car can be a good way to observe local nature without trekking through rough terrain.

Highways of Silk

Jun 13, 2012

John Weeks talks about Tent Caterpillars and their effect on apple and cherry trees. Weeks explains how these insects, usual thought of as pests, serve a necessary role in the ecosystem. In fact, the Tent Caterpillars are not really harmful to the trees at all.

Originally aired June 19,1987.

Focusing on the Ferns

Jun 11, 2012

John Weeks encourages his listeners to stop and study the ferns. Ferns can be confusing and difficult to identify. Still, Weeks believes that their elegant form and unusual lifecycle make these plants worth your time and energy.

John Weeks talks about the importance of not interfering with wildlife. Weeks explains why it is best to leave young wild animals alone.

Originally aired on June 6th, 1987.

John Weeks discusses the many unusual ways birds construct makeshift nests in the spring. Weeks shares stories of birds using "wildlife ad-libbing" to survive in inhospitable weather.

John Weeks talks to listeners about baby wildlife that are left alone during the spring and how we should not worry about them. Weeks explains that departure of the young should not be taken as a sign of abandonment and what to do if you see a wildlife baby animal.

Originally aired on April 26th, 1985.