winter

Erin Gardner

With New Yorkers dealing with an extremely cold start to the new year, Sen. Charles Schumer is calling for more federal heating aid to be made available.

Schools and businesses throughout northern New York were closed Tuesday and Wednesday, after storms dropped nearly three feet of snow in Watertown and the surrounding towns. The heavy snowfall was accompanied by wind chill temperatures that approached -30 degrees.

Jennifer Gaffney

Travelers got back on the road yesterday afternoon after Interstate 81 reopened following the massive snowfall. Many spent an unexpected night in the north country – some in hotels, some in fire halls, some in the homes of strangers. The experience might have been a lousy advertisement for the climate here, but natives seemed to be at their best as Good Samaritans during the storm.

School closings and delays for Wednesday

Jan 8, 2014
ecksunderscore / via Flickr

There are several closings and delays this morning, as schools report bitterly cold wind chill temperatures and lake effect snow. Check back for more cancelations.

Auburn City Schools: One Hour Delay

Beaver River Central: Closed

Belleville-Henderson Central: Closed

Canastota Central: Two Hour Delay

Carthage Central: Closed

Cazenovia Central: Two Hour Delay

Chittenango Central: Two Hour Delay

Cold weather grips central, northern New York

Jan 2, 2014
Loren Sztajer / Flickr

Much of central New York is under a winter storm warning until tomorrow morning. Snow will fall heavily at times around the region, with the heaviest of the snow falling from Syracuse south. Six to 12 inches of snow is possible around central New York by tomorrow with lesser amounts to the north.

In addition to the snow, the region will be facing bitterly cold temperatures. Wind chill advisories are posted for the region through tomorrow morning.

School closings and delays

Jan 2, 2014
ecksunderscore / via Flickr

A winter storm moving through central and northern New York, combined with brisk winds and bitterly cold temperatures, is causing some school delays and closings this morning.

John Weeks discusses deep winter weathers that arrive around times of the year like this one. Animals have to face severe conditions to survive in these cold harsh winters. The sub-freezing temperatures characterize the weather conditions upstate New York. Seasonal shedding is an annoyance to pet owners but it is an adaption to this weather. Wild animals find way to adapt to the weather too. Just like we have clothing that helps us adapt to weather, animals too have natural adaptions to weather that help them prepare for the seasons to come.

Some rights reserved by Tonu Mauring

Think of a large thermos, large enough to put a family in. That’s a passive house. Passive houses are buildings that rely on their construction, insulation, and the environment to heat them in winter and cool them in summer.

They’re popular in Europe, but there are only a handful of them in the U.S. and one of them belongs to a family in upstate New York, who are getting ready to take on their first winter in their passive home.

This is an archived broadcast from October 28, 1988. John Weeks talks about where insects go in the winter and he talks about how he use to teach a class in CNY and every year he would explain to the students where the insects go in the winter. He talks a lot about butterflies and some other insects hibernating.

In this, broadcast from 1988, John Weeks talks about how insects act during the winter. He mentions that some insects hibernate during the winter while other insects do not. He talks about the different bugs and then he tells a story about when he used to occasionally teach in Central New York and talked about some things that he asked his students. Weeks goes into detail about some of the insects especially the caterpillar.

Why so SAD?

Nov 17, 2013
Marcel / Flickr

Winter in central and northern New York isn’t always as picturesque as some may wish it to be. Daylight is usually gone before the work day is over, flurries have the potential to make any drive difficult, and gray skies often seem like they’re never going away. It’s normal to feel off when the days get shorter, but what happens when these feelings manifest into something much more serious on a yearly basis?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Kelly Rohan discusses the causes and treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Rohan is an expert in SAD and acting director of clinical training in the Department of Psychology at the University of Vermont.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Rohan.

Just One Move Road Trip

Nov 14, 2013

John Weeks discusses the change in a duck’s body from season to season. He recognizes the differentiations between female ducks and male ducks. He observes ducks playing in a pond before these ponds freeze due to the cold weather. He observes other animals that will be in hiding very soon as winter is approaching rapidly.

This episode of Nature of Things was originally aired November 21st, 1991.

Winter Bluebirds

Apr 2, 2013

John Weeks discusses bluebirds and other thrushes that may remain in the area during the winter months as long as a food source is available.

John Weeks describes his explorations following the Great Blizzard of '93. March of 2013 marks the 20 year anniversary of the Storm of the Century.

Snowbanks perform many functions, but it is a liberating event when they show signs of disappearing. John Weeks discusses everything that is coming to life within snowbanks and everything that is left behind after the final ones melt.

Much of nature is covered by snow each winter. John Weeks dispels the rumor that the winter landscape without snow is baron and uninteresting.

Snowshoeing

Jan 11, 2013

John Weeks discusses his limited experience with snowshoeing and recounts various encounters with wildlife while out on the winter trails.

When It Gets This Cold

Jan 8, 2013

John Weeks suggests that both man and wildlife need to know their limitations in order for maximum productivity in cold weather.

Last night's rainfall was not a welcome sound for Peter Harris, owner of Song Mountain in Tully.

John Weeks discusses all aspects of a pond in winter with the help of a reliable guide, the muskrat. While some creatures remain tethered beneath the ice to wait out the winter, there are fewer signs of life than in other seasons.

John Weeks discusses behaviors and preparations of animals and plants in nature during the winter months. He suggests that the wild world has no time for "cabin fever."

John Weeks discusses how the activities of both humans and wildlife are climate regulated. Wildlife, however, only change their clothes a couple of times per year.

While he has never been convinced of any steadfast signs that a particularly rough winter is ahead, John Weeks shares some speculative short and long-term weather prognostications.

Credit USACE Europe District / via Flickr

Someday your local weatherman may also be able predict the latest flu outbreak. That's according to a new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Researchers try to individualize light therapy

Nov 23, 2012

As upstate New York heads into some of the darkest days of the calendar year, researchers at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy are trying to shed some light on our individual cycle of sleeping and waking known as the circadian rhythm.

The First Snowfall

Nov 23, 2012

Weeks discusses exploring during the first snowfall in order to discover anything new. He shares stories of the puzzles in the snow he has encountered during past walks.

John Weeks suggests using the found hour brought on by "falling back" late in the year to do things you otherwise couldn't do. Take advantage before your body adjusts and the found hour is lost.

John Weeks discusses critters (good and bad) who may decide to take up residence in your home or garage during the cold, winter months. He offers tips on how you can control the flow of unwanted pests from making your home their home.

John Weeks talks about the sadness of the autumn leaf fall that is tempered by the wonderful colors and the knowledge of the beauty that lies ahead. He explains why leaves fall and the benefits of the yearly occurrence.

John Weeks discusses the first widespread freeze of the year, and the gorgeous day that proceeded it. He also explains the significance of microclimates and their undetected presence nearly everywhere we turn.

Paul Hudson / Flickr

A return to normal winter weather means New Yorkers can expect to see a rise in their heating bills. Those using natural gas to heat their homes will see higher bills despite a 12 percent drop in pricing.

Pages