Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Onondaga Lake restoration plans announced

The state and federal governments want to make up for decades lost enjoying Onondaga Lake because of massive pollution. They have a plan that includes 20 restoration projects along the shore of a lake once called the most polluted in America.

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Trish Marki / North Country Wild Care

Two bald eagles died in the North Country this spring after being poisoned with lead. That’s according to a wildlife rehabilitation group in the Lake George area. This comes at a time when there’s a fierce debate over sportsmen’s use of lead ammunition and lead fishing tackle.

"She didn't even survive overnight."

Trish Marki has been a wildlife rehabilitator with North Country Wild Care for more than a decade. She’s federally licensed to handle bald eagles. Last month, she got the call about a bird that looked sick in Washington County.

According to the Boy Scout Law, "a Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent."

But does a Boy Scout have to be a boy?

Sydney Ireland has been involved with scouting since she was four years old, when she began tagging along with her older brother to Cub Scout meetings. Since then, she has been an unofficial, but enthusiastic, member of Troop 414 in Manhattan.

The latest recommendations for breast cancer screening

7 hours ago
Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

For many women, breast cancer screenings are an important consideration for their health and peace of mind. In recent years, however, screening recommendations have changed, and some may be left unsure of what to do. When is the right time for a baseline mammogram? And how often again after that?

To answer these questions and more, “Take Care” was joined by Dr. Jane Charlamb, director of the Division of Breast Health and Lactation Medicine in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at SUNY Upstate Medical University. Charlamb’s clinical practice focuses on benign breast disease, breast cancer screening, and prevention in high risk women.

Talk to voters across the country about President Trump's first 100 days in office and a few things become abundantly clear:

His supporters — those who turned out in force and voted for him — still overwhelmingly love him.

His detractors — and they are many, given that Trump failed to win the popular vote — are still shocked by his election and appalled by his behavior.

He has lost support, particularly among moderates and independent voters. That's a big reason that polls give him the lowest approval rating of any modern president this soon after taking office.

President Trump starts the second hundred days of his administration Sunday with a perhaps unwelcome benchmark: fewer appointees in place than any of his recent predecessors.

Only a fraction of the hundreds of key jobs the Trump administration needs to fill have been nominated and confirmed by the Senate.

The idea of measuring an American president by the accomplishments of his first 100 days in office goes back to 1933 and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's dash to staunch a banking crisis and pull America out of the Great Depression.

Getting protein on the go

7 hours ago
Alyson Hurt / Flickr

Getting protein during a sit-down meal may not be hard, but getting more protein in snacks can be more difficult. Many protein-rich foods like meat are hard to consume when you’re on the go.

This week on "Take Care," nutritionist Joan Rogus discusses protein’s role in our diet and the various snacks that are packed with it, including some surprising ones. Rogus is a registered dietician in central New York who has her own private practice in Syracuse.

As we head into the 100th day of the Trump presidency, NPR Ed has our regular weekly education roundup to keep you in the loop.

Attorneys General speak out on behalf of student borrowers

Twenty state attorneys general and the District of Columbia this week sent a letter criticizing Education Secretary Betsy DeVos for revoking federal protections for student borrowers.

Putting together a march on the National Mall is a demanding task, to put it mildly. And the organizers of the Women's March only had two months to put together an event that quickly grew from a Facebook post to a worldwide phenomenon.

"I think what's really interesting is we didn't necessarily have a lot of time to think about next steps," said activist Carmen Perez.

Updated at 5:05 p.m. ET.

With the clock ticking, Congress on Friday managed to fulfill its basic function — keeping the federal government running.

The House and Senate approved a short-term measure that funds the government for another week. Lawmakers voted hours ahead of a midnight deadline to avoid a partial shutdown of federal agencies.

Friday's extension gives members of Congress more time — until midnight on May 5 — to try to reach a deal on a spending bill that will last through the rest of fiscal year 2017, which ends Sept. 30.

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