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Cuomo, legislative leaders predict even after budget is done, more work will remain

Several proposals in Washington could mean multi-billion-dollar budget gaps for New York state. With the budget due in one week, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders think that at the very least, they may have to come back later in the year to revise the spending plan.

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A shooting in a Cincinnati nightclub left 15 people wounded, one of them fatally, early on Sunday morning.

The number of victims could rise, however, because people were traveling to hospitals on their own, Cincinnati police Capt. Kim Williams said.

NBC affiliate WLWT reported that police officers outside the club heard gunshots around 1 a.m., as the Cameo Night Club was closing.

Assistant Police Chief Paul Neudigate has tweeted that there was "only one reported shooter," and that police are "still investigating if others [are] involved."

After yesterday's pulled health care vote, many on the left and the right are seeing it as a failure for Republicans — but former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay says it's actually a blessing in disguise.

Republican Senator Lindsey Graham faced a tough, boisterous crowd at a town hall in Columbia, South Carolina today.

The public meeting came the day after Republicans failed to repeal the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare. "The process was not what I wanted it to be," he said, adding that he thinks Obamacare is a disaster and is going to collapse. And he doesn't think one party is going to be able to fix it alone.

Vice President Mike Pence traveled to West Virginia Saturday where he met with small business owners before delivering public remarks, which included some lines about repealing Barack Obama's health care law, a day after Republicans efforts to gut the Affordable Care Act went down in flames.

"West Virginia and President Trump, we all know the truth about this failed law, that every day Obamacare survives is another day that America suffers," Pence told a crowd gathered at a Charleston construction supply company.

Some basketball viewers on Friday night were subjected to television commercials that were guilty of peddling some alternative facts.

That's because in some markets with conservative-leaning districts, commercials aired praising some Republican House members for their efforts in repealing the Affordable Care Act, commonly called Obamacare.

Political predictions are a dangerous business, especially this year. But it does look as though one way or another, the U.S. Senate will vote to confirm the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. The open question is how much damage Democrats will do to their own long game in the process.

Even as they lick their wounds from a failed Affordable Care Act repeal effort, Republican leaders in Washington are looking ahead to the next battle — over taxes.

"I would say that we will probably start going very, very strongly for the big tax cuts and tax reform," President Trump told reporters Friday. "That will be next."

Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan agreed, though he conceded that the defeat on health care was a setback.

"This does make tax reform more difficult," Ryan said. "But it does not in any way make it impossible."

Editor's Note: This story includes videos and descriptions of violent encounters between police and civilians, as well as language that may not be appropriate for all readers.

Debunking asthma diagnoses

Mar 25, 2017
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You've heard it before in a wheezy cough or the puff of an inhaler. Asthma is a common inflammatory disease. It is estimated that one in every thirteen adults is affected by asthma, which comes out to roughly 17 million people, according to the Centers for Disease Control. But in a new study published by the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers found that 33 percent of diagnosed patients did not, in fact, have the disease.

To understand more about these findings, “Take Care” was joined by the author of this study, Dr. Sean Aaron. Aaron is a professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Ottawa, and a senior scientist at Ottawa Hospital Research Institute in Ontario, Canada.  

Who's who in the exam room

Mar 25, 2017
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Have you ever gone into a doctor’s appointment and been left wondering who took your blood pressure? Who asked about that prescription? Chances are you’re not alone.

Sometimes it’s difficult to know who’s who in the exam room. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Robert Schmerling, associate physician and clinical chief of rheumatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and associate professor in medicine at Harvard Medical School, talks about this exam room dilemma.

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