News

Julia Botero / WRVO News

A group of anti-abortion protestors greeted Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) as she arrived at a meeting with business leaders in Watertown on Monday. The protestors asked Gillibrand to address the efforts in the Senate to defund Planned Parenthood.

The Republican-led senate voted on a bill Monday to stop federally funding the organization in response to undercover videos that appear to show executives of the organization discussing the sale of fetal tissue for medical research. The bill was blocked.

Senate Democrats / Flickr

A vote on a cyber security bill is expected soon in the U.S. Senate.

The proposal would overhaul the nation’s cyber security laws, and senate leaders are hoping to move on it before lawmakers leave town for an August recess later this week.

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) though has some concerns about the bill, especially how US companies would lose access to certain software that hackers use to break into networks. 

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

 

Democratic Assemblyman Sam Roberts was recently confirmed by the state Senate as the commissioner of the New York State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance. That means he has stepped down from the Assembly. Now, his district seat, which includes parts of Syracuse and the town of Onondaga, is up for grabs.

 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

After sitting unnoticed amidst weeds for two decades behind the Museum of Science and Technology in Syracuse’s Armory Square, a section of the Berlin Wall is now the centerpiece of new peace garden. The slab of concrete that was a sign of the end of the Cold War, thanks to  an anonymous donor 

Avoiding the dreaded traveler's diarrhea

Aug 2, 2015
maaco / flickr

Traveler’s diarrhea. It’s something not everybody can avoid, no matter how hard they try. But why do some contract this ailment even when taking all the necessary precautions not to?

This is the focus on this week’s “Take Care,” where we talk to Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky about how sometimes, no matter how cautious you might, be “Montezuma’s Revenge” can still strike.

Kozarsky is a professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Emory University School of Medicine, and medical director of TravelWell, a clinic that serves international travelers. She is also a co-founder of the International Society of Travel Medicine and an expert consultant on travelers’ health with the CDC.

jfingas / Flickr

Technology has always been the way of the future. The medical field, typically known for its advanced medical technology, has adopted a new form of service:  mobile.

This week on “Take Care,” health and technology reporter Jennifer Jolly discusses smartphone apps that can bring the doctor’s office to the patients. Jolly recently authored an article for The New York Times Well blog about the mobile doctor apps and how they are changing the medical field.

Missing from the Campbell Conversations recent series on poverty was a discussion focused on rural poverty.  In this edition of the program, host Grant Reeher fills that gap with a conservation with Lindy Glennon, director of the Cortland County Community Action Program.  They discuss the particular challenges and prejudices facing rural poor people, and how best to help them.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO News file photo

State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli says he has no interest in challenging Gov. Andrew Cuomo in a primary in three years, saying he prefers to seek re-election as comptroller.

DiNapoli, a favorite among many state Democrats (especially in the party’s left-leaning base), says he has no interest in running in a primary against Cuomo. The state comptroller says he intends to seek another term in his current post and says he’s set up a campaign committee for the comptroller’s slot for 2018.

“I happen to love this job,” DiNapoli says. “I think it’s the best job in state government.”

Doctor house calls go high-tech

Jul 31, 2015
CNBP / Flickr

The idea of the old-fashioned doctor house call has gone high-tech. Now, there are smart phone apps to schedule a home doctor visit or video conference call with a medical practitioner. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak to health and technology reporter Jennifer Jolly about what's driving this trend. Jolly writes the Wired Well column for the New York Times Well blog.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

An apartment building geared towards students is going up in the shadow of Syracuse University. The new complex reflects a real estate sector that developers say has been neglected.

A long-vacant medical building has been torn down, and in its place a six story 54-unit student apartment complex is being built on University Avenue. The $18 million project has been a dream of Syracuse University grad Jared Hutter, a lead developer on the project, ever since he and his college roommate lived together in a house on Madison street in Syracuse a decade ago.

Melinda Shelton / Flickr

Schools across the state are bracing for a potential zero percent growth in their tax levy next year. While the latest provisions of an ongoing tax cap won’t take effect until the 2016 school year, the state schools boards association says schools are starting to worry now.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

 

Dr. Robert Neulander was sentenced to 20 years to life in prison on Thursday for the murder of his wife Leslie Neulander in 2012. The trial of the prominent OB-GYN has shocked and fascinated the Syracuse community.

 

Onondaga County Court Judge Thomas Miller said he did not sentence Neulander to the maximum 25 years to life in prison because of the emotional toll taken on the Neulander family. They have maintained that Neulander is innocent. But Judge Miller also did not sentence the minimum 15 years in prison after scrutinizing the jurors' verdict.

 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

There was no cake, but Medicare’s 50th birthday was serenaded by a few dozen Central New Yorkers in downtown Syracuse Thursday. 

Medicare and Medicaid were signed into law in 1965, and have been providing medical care for the poor and elderly ever since.  Robert O’Connor of Onondaga County’s AARP, says the milestone is worth noting.

Senate Democrats / Flickr

As the Obama Administration continues its effort to convince Congress to approve its nuclear deal with Iran, both senators from New York have yet to say how they will vote on a September resolution to approve the deal.

Congress is in the midst of a 60-day review period. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand tells reporters she's still studying the agreement.

"I read the whole agreement. I studied it. I have talked to several experts. And I'm assessing the risks."

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The final piece in the Onondaga County's Lakeview Amphitheater project is in place. Country singer Miranda Lambert has been inked as the first artist to play the venue. It’s taken just a little over year to get the sometimes controversial project ready for prime time.

Governor Andrew Cuomo / Flickr

Two more lawmakers, a former Senate Leader and the Deputy Majority Leader of the Senate, were convicted of corruption in the past week. But Gov. Andrew Cuomo continues to say it would not be a good idea to call state lawmakers back to the Capitol to enact more ethics reform measures.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

The Onondaga County Industrial Development Agency is reviewing the process of taking over the Roth Steel scrapyard along Onondaga Lake by eminent domain.

 

Ryan McMahon, chairman of the Onondaga County Legislature, asked the Industrial Development Agency to look into the procedure and says the IDA will do an environmental review of the property with potential public hearings.

 

Roth Steel, which closed the scrapyard in 2014, was recently sold to the Canadian-based company, American Iron & Metal.

 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Country music superstar Miranda Lambert will be the inaugural act at Onondaga County’s newly constructed Lakeview Amphitheater.

Onondaga County Executive Joanie Mahoney announced Wednesday that Lambert will appear September 3. Even though that leaves promoters with five weeks to sell tickets, Mahoney is optimistic there will be a full house.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Attorney Greg Scicchitano will be running as a Republican for town supervisor in the town of DeWitt. Scicchitano is running against the incumbent Democrat Edward Michalenko, who has been the DeWitt town supervisor since 2008 and served on the town board before that.

 

“The position of an elected official should not be a career job," Scicchitano said. "It should be something that they do for a limited period of time and then move on. I don't think there are proper voices being heard I don't think there are perspectives being listened to.”

 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Dozens of Central New Yorkers gathered on the lawn in front of the East Genesee Street offices of Planned Parenthood in Syracuse Tuesday, saying they were spurred into action by undercover videos of the agency's executives apparently talking about the sale of body parts culled from aborted fetuses for medical research. 

"When somebody’s looking to find money to buy a Lamborghini, and is looking to sell body parts to do that, it’s a new low,” said one protester at Tuesday's rally.

Others at the rally shared the same sentiment.

Mitchell pleads guilty to helping prisoners escape

Jul 29, 2015
Clinton County Sheriff's Department

 

Joyce Mitchell, the former civilian employee at Clinton Correctional Facility, pleaded guilty Tuesday to helping convicted murdererers Richard Matt and David Sweat escape from the prison.

Karen Dewitt / WRVO News

Supporters of paid family leave in New York say they hope 2016 will be their year, but business groups are urging caution.

A measure to allow all workers in the state 12 weeks of paid leave to take care of a new baby or sick family member was approved in the New York State Assembly, and two measures gained support in the New York State Senate, but the issue fell by the wayside in the end of session rush to pass bills and adjourn for the summer.

Watertown Airport

A new building and hangar at the Watertown Airport has opened to serve the growing needs of the local business community.

There are two parts to the Watertown Airport just outside the city -- there’s the commercial side where passengers board the two American Airlines flights to Philadelphia each day, and there’s the side that caters to private businesses. Jim Nabywaniec is a Jefferson County legislator who helps oversee projects at the airport.

Andrew Malone / Flickr

As egg prices continue to rise across the country because of the avian flu outbreak, lawmakers are proposing cutting $500 million in research funding from the federal budget that would look into ways to deal with the devastating bird flu. 

Sen. Charles Schumer calls these proposed Agriculture Department cuts mindless.

Governor Andrew Cuomo's office

The Public Service Commission comes to Syracuse this summer to find out what internet and cable access is like for residents of the city.  And there won’t be many positives to take away, if they hear the same thing residents are telling Mayor Stephanie Miner.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

 

The Greater Syracuse Land Bank, which acquires tax-delinquent properties with the goal of getting them back on the tax roll, is renegotiating its contract with the city. 

 

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

 

A $110 million federal grant will be matched with half a billion dollars in public and private investments in order to create a Photonics Research and Manufacturing Hub in Rochester.

Vice President Joe Biden, Under Secretary of Defense Frank Kendall, and Gov. Andrew Cuomo came together with Rep. Louise Slaughter (D-Rochester), Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren to make the announcement in Rochester.

Stigma around seeking treatment for mental health problems is a bigger barrier in communities of color. That's according to MaJose Carrasco the director of the Multicultural Action Center at the National Alliance on Mental Illness -- or NAMI.

July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. Representatives from NAMI say they’re fighting isolation many people living with mental illness experience.

www.newlabor.org

Over two million American workers are exposed to silica dust in industries like construction, mining, road repair and sand blasting. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is now pushing for tougher limits on how much silica dust they can be exposed to in the workplace.

But the proposed rules will come too late for many workers who’ve already contracted the potentially fatal lung disease, silicosis. 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Don’t expect the decision last week by the New York State Wage Board to boost the minimum wage for New York’s fast food workers to $15 an hour to be the end of the story. At least one central New York lawmaker expects this to be the beginning of a bigger debate.

For Syracuse-area Assemblyman Bill Magnarelli, there’s no question that the state’s minimum wage should be upped to $15 an hour for everyone.

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