News

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

This year's state legislative session has produced no agreements on ethics reform, even though Albany is in the midst of a what some call a corruption crime wave. Capitol correspondent Karen DeWitt (who is recovering from a cold) spoke to longtime League of Women Voters lobbyist Barbara Bartoletti about the lack of action.

Karen Dewitt / WRVO News

The state Assembly and Senate adjourned for the year last night, without any deals on extending control of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s authority over the public school system, or the continuation of sales taxes in upstate and Long Island counties. Assembly Democrats have tied the two issues together in one bill, and Assembly Majority Leader Joe Morelle called it a basic concept.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

A vote this week to give the Syracuse Police Department $1.6 million for new vehicles became a lightning rod for a bigger issue. Some Syracuse Common Councilors say various spending items should be delayed because of the financial health of the city.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

Syracuse’s Hancock International Airport is preparing for the era of ride-hailing services that’s about to descend on upstate New York.

Starting June 29, travelers will be able to use ride hailing apps to get around town. One of the major requests is expected to include rides back and forth to the Syracuse airport. To that end, airport commissioner Christina Callahan says the airport is working with the two big players in the ride-hailing world, Lyft and Uber.

Catherine Loper / WRVO News

The state Senate is likely to confirm Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s nomination to fill the latest vacancy on the state’s highest court.

Judge Paul Feinman would be the first openly gay judge on the Court of Appeals. During a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, the Long Island native was generally praised by committee members.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

All nine Syracuse mayoral candidates participated in a forum this week. It was a crowded stage that produced a wide range of different answers.

David Stone / Flickr

Residents in some eastside Syracuse neighborhoods and the town of DeWitt agree that something should be done about a burgeoning deer population. Those are the findings of a survey conducted by Assemblywoman Pam Hunter.

The next step is finding out just how many deer are out there, and what can be done to put a dent in the herd. Research wildlife biologist Brian Underwood says it starts by counting deer in some neighborhoods in the eastside of Syracuse, and going on from there.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The Greater Syracuse Land Bank celebrated its fifth birthday this week with a bus trip to show off some of it’s success stories.  

Land bank officials and others visited demolition sights, a community garden and renovated rental housing, like Sam Reppi’s conversion of a dilapidated building on Burnet Avenue into apartments and a storefront business.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

State lawmakers have passed legislation that could provide financial relief for those affected by Lake Ontario flooding. The new bill was approved after weeks of debate between the state Senate and Assembly over how much to spend and whom should be be eligible

-JvL- / Flickr

There was a flurry of activity — along with threats and ultimatums — on Monday at the state Capitol, but there were no agreements on major issues as the session draws to a scheduled close on Wednesday.

Victims of childhood sexual abuse remain hopeful that there could be a vote in the state Senate on a measure to extend the statute of limitations to age 28 for criminal proceedings and age 50 for civil proceedings.

Senate Democratic Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins urged the majority coalition of Republicans and breakaway Democrats to allow the bill on the floor for a vote.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) has introduced a bill in the House of Representatives that he hopes makes it easier to stop the importation and distribution of synthetic drugs.

One of the nagging problems facing law enforcement as it fights the synthetic drug epidemic is the time it takes to make a particular drug illegal. It takes years to get on the federal Drug Enforcement Agency’s Schedule A list of banned substances, and by then, dealers have tweaked the chemical compound enough to avoid arrest and prosecution.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Ride-hailing companies like Uber and Lyft will be allowed to operate in upstate New York starting June 29th. But some in Syracuse want the city to opt out. 

Oswego County Health Department / File Photo

This spring's wet weather could make the blue-green algae problem worse later this summer.

It’s no secret that this has been a tremendously rainy spring, according to SUNY ESF biochemistry professor Greg Boyer. And that could set the stage for big algae blooms later this summer. Blooms rely on nitrogen and phosphorus that run into the lake, combined with hot and calm sunny days.

Marco Varisco / Flickr

The New York State Legislature is approaching its final week of the 2017 session, and agreements on outstanding issues, including mayoral control over the state’s largest school system, remain elusive. 

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

A new exhibition at the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute in Utica looks at how New York state led America into a new artistic and decorative era in the early 20th century. Many of the pieces on display  were manufactured in upstate New York.

From flapper hats made in Buffalo to Eastman Kodak cameras in Rochester and Steuben Glass in Corning, more than 100 objects from across the state, defining the modern era, are featured. Guest curator Lori Zabar notes modernism is a difficult term to describe.

Shinichi Sugiyama / Flickr

The Auburn Enlarged City School District is cutting 13.5 staff positions to cover a more than $3.5 million-dollar deficit.

The reductions will result in job losses for about eight employees, according to Superintendent Jeff Pirozzolo, who says the numbers would have been far worse had the community not approved an increase in taxes this spring.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The residential growth in downtown Syracuse shows no sign of slowing down, with the newest property almost filled.

When Blue Cross/Blue Shield moved it’s offices to the suburbs in 2008, it left a gaping hole in downtown Syracuse. The Warren Street complex actually is made up of four buildings, and that’s what Graziano Zazzara has repurposed into dozens of luxury apartments.

"We opened up four months ago, started renting apartments, and we have one left out of 89," Zazzara said. 

Tick-borne diseases on the move

Jun 17, 2017
Macroscopic Solutions / Flickr

Residents of the Northeastern U.S. have become increasingly familiar with Lyme disease, which is transmitted by ticks. But the tick population in this country is spreading and growing, and along with it, so are the diseases they carry.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Richard Ostfeld, senior scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, a not-for-profit research institution in Millbrook, New York, discusses the latest information on ticks and tick-borne diseases. The Cary Institute examines the science behind environmental solutions. Ostfeld also teaches at Rutgers University and the University of Connecticut, and has authored the book, "Lyme Disease: The Ecology of a Complex System."

Going nuts for butters

Jun 17, 2017
Susan Rubin / Flickr

While many American kids grow up eating peanut butter, in recent years, a wide variety of different kinds of nut and seed butters have hit the grocery store shelves. But what kind of nutritional value to they all provide?

This week on “Take Care,” sports nutritionist Nancy Clark gives us a primer on nut and seed butters. Clark is the author of “Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guidebook.” She writes the monthly nutrition column “The Athlete's Kitchen,” which appears in over 100 sports and fitness publications and websites.

WRVO News

Can a Republican candidate still be competitive in the heavily Democratic city of Syracuse? This week on the Campbell Conversations, Grant Reeher talks with Laura Lavine, the Republican candidate for mayor. Lavine has never run for political office, and most recently served superintendent of the LaFayette School District. They discuss her approach to leadership, and some of her more specific policy ideas  for the city, as well as the politics of running from the minority party.

Fairfax County / Flickr

Many residents of the Northeast are familiar with Lyme disease. But the tick population in this country is increasing -- and so are the number of tick-borne diseases and the number of people contracting them. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Richard Ostfeld, a disease ecologist with the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Progress is mixed on some redevelopment projects in downtown Syracuse. The Redhouse Arts Center is moving forward with construction in the old Sibley’s department store as part of a larger restoration of the building.

Workers are closing off a wall with cinder block tiles in what will be the Redhouse’s new 350-seat main stage theater in what used to be the Sibley’s warehouse. A concrete ceiling was cut out to raise the room’s height to 25 feet so rigging equipment can drop in set pieces.

Catherine Loper / WRVO News

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has named the first openly gay judge to New York’s highest court.

Cuomo has nominated Paul Feinman, an appellate court judge and LGBT rights advocate, to fill a vacancy on the New York State Court of Appeals. During an interview on the cable news station NY1, Cuomo praised Feinman’s abilities.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The impact of the more than a billion dollars the state has invested for economic development in central New York should be kicking in soon, according to state officials.

A faction of breakaway Democrats known as the Independent Democratic Conference has been in the news lately for receiving stipend payments for chairing committees that the Senators in fact did not chair. Here’s a look at the history of this power-brokering group of senators and what may be in store for its future.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Symphoria, the professional symphony orchestra of central New York, will play 13 free shows around the region this summer. And the organization has renewed Music Director Lawrence Loh’s contract for four more years.

In addition to traveling around the country as a guest conductor, Loh was also selected as the music director of the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra. Which begs the question, how is he able to wave so many batons at once?

Vernon Downs Racing Casino and Hotel

The owner of Vernon Downs Jeff Gural says without intervention from state lawmakers, his business will close.

Syracuse University photo by Stephen Sartori

A study of the central New York labor market finds a disconnect between people looking for jobs and organizations trying to hire.

The non-profit Onondaga Citizens League conducted a year-long study of the employment picture in the region, called ““How CNY Works.” The report includes some positive statistics – like the fastest-growing occupation (computer and information research scientists), and the industries with the most growth (management of companies and enterprises).

Alex Crichton / WXXI News

Gov. Andrew Cuomo visited the communities of Greece and Sodus Point, along the southern shore of Lake Ontario to assess damage to homes and businesses from high water levels on Lake Ontario.

Damage he says is due in part to a late response from the board that regulates water levels on Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River, the International Joint Commission.

The Democrat blasted the IJC, saying the agency bears much of the blame for flooding in New York's lakeside communities.

Karen Dewitt / WRVO News

Legislative leaders are dug in on remaining issues in the 2017 session and are accusing each other of unfairly linking unrelated items to renewal of mayoral control over New York City schools. Time is running out for scheduled meetings.

The renewal of mayoral control of New York City schools faces a hard deadline. It expires at the end of the month.

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