News

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Water levels continue to rise on Lake Ontario, and the National Weather Service has issued a Lakeshore Flood Warning for Oswego and Jefferson counties from 4 p.m. Tuesday until 4 p.m. Wednesday. 

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Several recent violent crimes in downtown Ithaca have prompted a reaction from the Ithaca Police Department. The crimes are uncommon for the city.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Central New Yorkers rang in President Donald Trump’s 100th day in office in starkly different rallies in Syracuse this weekend. The two events Saturday were only a few miles away, but the political distance between the two groups seemed much farther.

At one event, hundreds marched to Syracuse’s Inner Harbor in coordination with climate change demonstrations across the country. They carried signs blasting the Trump administration for rolling back environmental regulations. Jacqueline King’s sign called for his impeachment.

Trish Marki / North Country Wild Care

Two bald eagles died in the North Country this spring after being poisoned with lead. That’s according to a wildlife rehabilitation group in the Lake George area. This comes at a time when there’s a fierce debate over sportsmen’s use of lead ammunition and lead fishing tackle.

"She didn't even survive overnight."

Trish Marki has been a wildlife rehabilitator with North Country Wild Care for more than a decade. She’s federally licensed to handle bald eagles. Last month, she got the call about a bird that looked sick in Washington County.

The latest recommendations for breast cancer screening

Apr 29, 2017
Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

For many women, breast cancer screenings are an important consideration for their health and peace of mind. In recent years, however, screening recommendations have changed, and some may be left unsure of what to do. When is the right time for a baseline mammogram? And how often again after that?

To answer these questions and more, “Take Care” was joined by Dr. Jane Charlamb, director of the Division of Breast Health and Lactation Medicine in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at SUNY Upstate Medical University. Charlamb’s clinical practice focuses on benign breast disease, breast cancer screening, and prevention in high risk women.

Getting protein on the go

Apr 29, 2017
Alyson Hurt / Flickr

Getting protein during a sit-down meal may not be hard, but getting more protein in snacks can be more difficult. Many protein-rich foods like meat are hard to consume when you’re on the go.

This week on "Take Care," nutritionist Joan Rogus discusses protein’s role in our diet and the various snacks that are packed with it, including some surprising ones. Rogus is a registered dietician in central New York who has her own private practice in Syracuse.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The guidelines for screening for breast cancer have changed over the years. This has led to a lot of confusion among women about who needs to be screened and when. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Jayne Charlamb, Director of the Division of Breast Health and Lactation Medicine in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, about why the guidelines have changed and what the current recommendations are.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO News File Photo

A bill that could address corruption in Albany is progressing in the state Legislature, but it might not be the measure that Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to become law.

Several former Cuomo associates, including a former top aide, face federal corruption trials on charges of bribery and bid-rigging in connection with the contracts for some of the governor’s signature economic development projects, including the Buffalo Billion.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

The Say Yes to Education program provides college tuition to students from the city of Syracuse. But now that New York state has its own free state college tuition program, there are questions as to what role Say Yes will play in the future. Officials that manage the Say Yes endowment say they are waiting on more details about the state’s plan.

President and CEO of the Central New York Community Foundation Peter Dunn said it is too soon to tell how the Say Yes scholarship might change because of the state’s new program.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The state and federal governments want to make up for decades lost enjoying Onondaga Lake because of massive pollution. They have a plan that includes 20 restoration projects along the shore of a lake once called the most polluted in America.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Dozens of alleged members of one of Syracuse’s most notorious gangs are off the street following Operation Bricktown, the first series of arrests in an initiative from the New York state attorney general’s office to get drugs off the streets.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman came to Syracuse Thursday to announce the arrest of more than 50 individuals with 370 crimes, ranging from drug dealing to murder conspiracy charges. Many of the individuals are allegedly members of the Bricktown Gang.

Gage Skidmore / via Flickr

Several New York state lawmakers are sponsoring a bill that they say would force President Donald Trump to make his state tax returns public.

Trump broke with a more than 40-year tradition of presidential candidates and presidents voluntarily releasing their tax returns. Trump has said he can’t release his returns because he is under audit.

In the 1970s, President Richard Nixon began the practice of releasing the tax filings, even though Nixon himself was under federal audit at the time. Since then, every president has voluntarily released his tax returns.

Jason Smith / WRVO News File Photo

More communities along the shoreline of Lake Ontario are being threatened as water levels continue to rise. As of April 24, water levels are more than 20 inches above the average for this time of year.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed the $2.5 billion Clean Water Infrastructure Act into law in Auburn this week, and a big chunk is going to help officials along Owasco Lake clean drinking water threatened by algae blooms.

Auburn Mayor Michael Quill is pleased that the state will pony up about $2 million to help pay for filtration systems meant eliminate toxins produced by the blue-green algae blooms that plague Owasco Lake.

“It’s like having Christmas come early this year," Quill said. 

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

A deficit of more than $18 million currently exists in the proposed budget of the city of Syracuse. About $13 million dollars is being allocated in overtime to the police and fire departments. Some councilors say the way to reduce overtime is to hire more staff.

Syracuse Fire Chief Paul Linnertz said the department has 28 firefighters in training.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

It’s become traditional to measure a president’s first 100 days in office. For President Donald Trump, that milestone occurs on Saturday. Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) says he isn’t ready to grade the president, but he does have some thoughts about how Trump has been doing.

Catherine Loper / WRVO News

State lawmakers and lobby groups say Gov. Andrew Cuomo was in error when he said that there was no political will to enact reforms in 2017.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Democrats in upstate New York say they may be down from the losses they suffered in the 2016 election, but not out. Party officials hope the pushback to the Republican administration in Washington, D.C., will sweep local Democrats to victory later this year. 

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

The Onondaga Creekwalk is a 2.5 mile pedestrian and bike trial along Onondaga Creek that runs from Onondaga Lake to downtown Syracuse. A new phase of the Creekwalk will extend the trail another two miles from downtown Syracuse to the city's south side.

Catherine Loper / WRVO News

A fiscal watchdog group is questioning the state’s century-old prevailing wage law for construction workers, saying it unnecessarily costs taxpayers billions of dollars a year in added expenses for big road, bridge and other projects.

The Empire Center, a fiscally conservative budget watchdog group, looked at the state’s constitutionally protected prevailing wage law. It requires contractors on public projects to pay their workers the amounts set in unions’ collective bargaining agreements.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

To the unknowing observer, charcoal may seem like an unlikely solution to toxic algae blooms in Owasco Lake. But that’s what Auburn city officials are hoping to use to prevent those toxins from getting into the city’s drinking water, which is sourced from the lake.

Toxins from algae are known to make humans and animals sick, and there are possible long-term health implications.

Auburn Mayor Michael Quill says active charcoal, as it’s called, is well-suited to blocking those toxins.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Developers are asking the Syracuse Industrial Development Agency for tax breaks to build a new Hampton Inn in Syracuse’s trendy Armory Square neighborhood. But it comes at a time when new hotels are sprouting up all over central New York.

SUNY / Twitter

The SUNY Board of Trustees appointed Kristina Johnson as the system's 13th chancellor Monday.

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

With Lake Ontario's waters continuing to rise. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has directed state agencies to assist communities for possible flooding. 

More than 130,000 sandbags have been deployed to the region, as residents prepare for flooding in low-elevation areas.

In some areas, sandbags have been positioned in locations that experienced flooding in the past few days and weeks. Other state assets have been staged at the regional stockpile in Monroe County.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) is voicing her objection to President Donald Trump’s proposal to eliminate funding of the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities. The cuts would have a direct effect on organizations in central New York.

At the Erie Canal Museum in Syracuse, Executive Director Natalie Stetson said federal funding allows them to do special projects. Funding helped them produce a documentary called, “Boom and Bust."

Catherine Loper / WRVO News

State legislators are due back at the Capitol Monday, following a break for Easter and Passover after they passed the new state budget. It contained numerous non-spending items -- like free public college tuition for some middle class students and an expansion of ride-hailing services. So what, if anything, do lawmakers still need to do before adjourning in June?

The Senate and Assembly are scheduled to meet for around two more months this year, but Gov. Andrew Cuomo, speaking a week after the budget was approved, told reporters that there isn’t much left to do.

Rep. John Katko / Facebook

Water levels continue rising along the southern shore of Lake Ontario. And while it’s unclear if Plan 2014 -- an initiative that changed the way water levels on the lake are controlled -- is responsible for the flooding, it’s put the controversial plan under the microscope.

The principal recommendation of the final report of the Consensus Commission on Local Government Modernization is to establish a new municipal form of government for Onondaga County, with a single executive and a 33-seat legislature. While public forums and town hall meetings have been held to discuss the report, and the proposal has been both criticized and defended in the media, missing is a direct exchange between opposing views, with opportunities for challenge and rebuttal.

Small NY cities wonder whether to fund stadiums

Apr 22, 2017
Gabe Altieri / WSKG News

Public money is often used to fund stadium upgrades. Elected officials say it builds up a local economy by attracting businesses, who want to set up nearby, and people, who spend their dollars in the city.

That claim is debated in major league cities around the country. But what about smaller cities, like Elmira and Binghamton? Could stadiums benefit those economies?

Nola Agha, a researcher at the University of San Francisco, set out to find the impact of minor league baseball stadiums on local economies.

Eelke / Flickr

With so many health products and practices promising to provide quick fixes to all that ails us, it can be difficult to discern which ones actually work. But for doctors and medical researchers, the question of effectiveness becomes an opportunity for clinical studies.

To find out more about some of these studies, “Take Care” spoke with Dr. Joann Manson, a professor of medicine at Harvard University, and chief of the Division of Preventive Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

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