News

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

While the town hall went on inside, protesters vented their frustrations about Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) outside the venue at Onondaga Community College. The rally organized by CNY Solidarity, objected to the rules and random selection of audience members at the town hall.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Monday night, 130 people were allowed in to what Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) labeled a town hall event, televised live by CNY Central’s NBC3/CBS5 television stations last night. 

Payne Horning / WRVO News File Photo

Town halls have become the political hot potato for members of Congress ever since Donald Trump became president. Activists have been dogging lawmakers since Trump’s inauguration, and one of their big complaints has been a lack of forums to air out their concern. 

Payne Horning / WRVO News

School districts across the state are holding votes on their budgets Tuesday. While almost all of them are keeping their spending requests within the mandatory tax cap, some districts wonder whether the cap is sustainable over the long term.

The property tax cap is now in its sixth year, and according to David Albert with the New York State School Boards Association, most of the state’s nearly 700 school districts are asking for increases that are within the limits of the cap.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Syracuse Common Councilor Joe Nicoletti has won the Democratic Party's designation in the race for the city’s next mayor. Nicoletti will likely have to face a primary in September.

Nicoletti has made several unsuccessful attempts at running for mayor before, but he has insisted that just shows his commitment to Syracuse. Nicoletti has previously said he will work to improve the city’s relationships with the county and state governments if he is elected.

Christoph Habel / Flickr

Whether you’re nine or 90, falls pose a risk to anyone on their feet. They can be unexpected, startling, and dangerous – especially as we get older – and as the leading cause of concussion and traumatic brain injury, it’s important to know what we can do to protect ourselves, should we take a tumble.

To find out about the right way to fall, “Take Care” spoke with physical therapist Jessica Schwartz, who works with athletes and individuals with prosthetic limbs on how to prevent falls and respective injuries.

Bakoko / Flickr

Of all the factors that influence our well-being, our environment itself is one often overlooked. We consider exercise and nutrition, sleep and stress -- but new research suggests that an optimal, “green” environment may be more influential than previously understood, increasing both productivity and overall health in the workplace and beyond.

To learn more about the latest in green environments, “Take Care” was joined by Piers MacNaughton, associate director of the Healthy Buildings Program at the Harvard Center for Health and Global Environment. MacNaughton recently managed a study on environmental influences in the hopes of determining what an “optimal built environment” looks like.

Seamus Kirst has written a raw and revealing new memoir about his struggles with addiction, sexual identity, and mental health.  The book, Sh*tfaced: Musings of a Former Drunk, also contains an equally unvarnished foreword by his father, the writer Sean Kirst.  

Green buildings, better workers?

May 12, 2017
Joh739 / Flickr

Companies are always looking for ways to make their employees more productive. Now, a new study shows that making buildings more environmentally friendly, or “green,” can make them healthier for the workers inside -- and improves those workers' cognitive functions. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Piers MacNaughton, an associate director of the Healthy Buildings Program at the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment. Dr. MacNaughton was the project manager for the study.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Alaska Purchase, which was negotiated by Secretary of State William Henry Seward, who lived in Auburn. The Seward House Museum is celebrating the anniversary with the unveiling of a new Seward statue on Saturday that will make its way to the Alaskan capitol of Juneau.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Trade is getting pushed to the top of the agenda for Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus). Katko says unfair trade practices are hurting businesses and taking away jobs in central New York.

The Republican says it’s happening on a couple of fronts -- from other nations dumping heavily subsidized products on the world market so American products can’t compete, to Canadian protectionist policies that have make it difficult for central New York dairy farms to sell their product.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

New medication-assisted treatment programs are opening across central New York to keep up with the opioid epidemic. The demand for the treatment is so high that a group of clinics are coming together in an effort to get the programs off the ground

A new online video ad featuring Gov. Andrew Cuomo and promoting tolerance has once again fueled talk that New York’s governor may be planning a presidential run. There are some questions, though, about the ad and its donors.

The ad, which for now is only running online, features Cuomo and several well-known actors, including Steve Buscemi and Whoopi Goldberg. All claim to be something other than they actually are to promote a message of unity and tolerance in a diverse state.

“As a New Yorker, I am black,” Cuomo says in the ad.

“I am white,” Goldberg says.

Luke H. Gordon / Flickr

Syracuse City Hall is fine tuning an open data policy, after a two-week public comment period.

The policy is expected to launch later this month, and offers residents an easy way to access to public information involving the work of city government. Mayor Stephanie Miner says so far, the city has gotten good feedback about the proposed policy.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

CNY Solidarity protesters are demanding Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) vote to release President Donald Trump’s tax returns. Protesters like Jonah Minkoff-Zern waited outside for Katko at a Wednesday event in Syracuse.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) said the firing of FBI Director James Comey by President Donald Trump will not interfere with the bureau’s investigation into Russian hacking of the 2016 presidential election.

Veronica Volk / Great Lakes Today

Flooding continues along the Lake Ontario shoreline and there’s no end in sight. Many residents and New York’s governor say the solution lies with a huge dam that straddles the U.S- Canada border. But the reality is not so simple.

Tom Piekunka stands in an inch of water in his backyard in Sodus Point. Water from Lake Ontario is still on the rise, and it's creeping closer and closer to the bright yellow two-story cottage where his family has lived for generations.

"If this was just a house I wouldn't care," he says. "But, it's a home."

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

One of the top issues remaining before the state legislature adjourns for the summer is fixing problems in the state’s economic development contracts. That’s after a scandal led to federal corruption charges against nine former associates of Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

A bill by state Comptroller Tom DiNapoli to reinstate the comptroller’s ability to oversee economic development contracts is gaining momentum in the legislature.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

A discussion about race has been sparked at Colgate University in Hamilton after the campus went into lockdown last week because a black student was carrying a glue gun. Some students say unfortunately, this conversation is nothing new for the private university.

A few fliers that say "Black Lives Matter" and "White Silence is Violence" now hang in the entranceway of Colgate university's campus center called the Coop. This is the building where a black student was seen carrying what appeared to be a gun. It led Colgate to issue an incorrect warning about an active shooter.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner says she is planning on vetoing the budget approved by the Syracuse Common Council this week. One of her big beefs with the budget is the elimination of funding for the Greater Syracuse Land Bank.

The city has subsidized the land bank for the last four years, at the rate of $1.5 million a year. The agency, which is not a city department, buys tax delinquent properties seized by the city and either demolishes them or puts them up for sale. It also is funded through state grants.

Dale Currier / Oswego County Emergency Management Office

The water level in Lake Ontario is now higher than is been in more than 60 years, before water levels started being regulated in the 1950s.

stgermh / Flickr

New York voters get a chance to decide in the fall whether the state should have a constitutional convention. Both state legislative leaders, however, say they are against it.

Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie and Senate Leader John Flanagan appeared together Tuesday at a forum sponsored by the Albany Times Union’s Hearst Media Center.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Some lawmakers are pressing the state’s comptroller to divest the state’s pension fund from the fossil fuel industry. But Comptroller Tom DiNapoli said he believes he can be more effective in changing the companies’ behavior by acting from the inside.

Tom Magnarelli

The Syracuse Common Council has passed a budget that includes some controversial changes to what Mayor Stephanie Miner had proposed. Miner said she will veto the changes.

The council has cut overtime from Syracuse’s fire and police departments by $1 million each. But Councilor Steven Thompson said the money cut for police overtime has been shifted to hire new officers.

Mountain Lake PBS live online

Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-Willsboro) took a number of questions regarding healthcare at a community forum hosted by Mountain Lake PBS Monday night. Stefanik recently voted for the GOP healthcare plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, which passed the House of Representatives. The North Country Republican defended the bill, but admits there are ways to improve it.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

The continued swelling of Lake Ontario is offering little relief to shoreline residents in central New York. Water levels on Lake Ontario have risen more than 9 inches since May 1, and are at the highest level since the 1950s, before water levels started being regulated.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Cayuga County officials want to prevent the spread an invasive species in Cayuga Lake, before it becomes impossible to contain.

Cayuga County Legislature Chair Keith Batman calls it a “devil weed.” He’s talking about hydrilla, one of the most invasive aquatic species in the world. It’s plagued Cayuga Lake for six years now, and measures to eradicate hydrilla in the Cayuga Inlet near Ithaca using herbicides have been successful. But last year, it was spotted further north in the lake.

Mark Lavonier

A piece of Oswego history is being showcased on stage that tells the story of a famous author's connection to Fort Ontario and his time there during World War I. Ludwig Bemelmans is more famously known for being the author of the Madeline children's books. His book "My War with the United States" has been adapted into a play by Oswego Players president Rick Sivers. WRVO's Mark Lavonier visited a rehearsal and spoke with Sivers about the author and production.

How the GOP health care bill could unfold in New York

May 8, 2017
www.bbb.org

Last week, the House of Representatives passed the American Health Care Act law, the Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act. This came after several changes to the AHCA, including to the policy on coverage for people with pre-existing conditions.

The update would allow insurance companies to charge sicker consumers more and healthier consumers less. The bill would offset the cost of sicker people with special funding -- $8 billion over five years. But what exactly this change would mean for individual consumers largely depends on which state they live in.

Provided photos.

Two Democratic mayoral candidates in Syracuse have different perspectives when it comes to tackling the city's problems. One comes from one of the poorest neighborhoods in the city, the other has built an organization that helps network more than 400 local, small businesses.

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