4:06pm

Mon July 16, 2012
Law

Even Scalia's Dissenting Opinions Get Major Scrutiny

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 10:01 pm

Justice Antonin Scalia testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Oct. 5, 2011.
Alex Wong Getty Images

As legal observers have sifted through the ashes and the tea leaves of the recent Supreme Court term, one justice has stood out for his dissents.

Justice Antonin Scalia was the first name on the joint dissent filed by four justices in the health care case. But it was Scalia's dissent in the Arizona immigration case, written for himself alone, that drew particular attention, and especially harsh criticism.

Read more

4:03pm

Mon July 16, 2012
Regional Coverage

Wegmans replacement on north side of Syracuse likely

The road is clear for another grocery store to move into the empty Wegmans Pond Street location on Syracuse's north side.

Wegmans, which closed its store there last month, has agreed to sell the property to Morgan Acquisitions.  

Mayor Stephanie Miner says the deal doesn't stop another grocer from moving in.

Read more

3:43pm

Mon July 16, 2012
The Two-Way

For Some British Creatures, Wet Conditions 'Almost Apocalyptic'

Puffins on Farne Islands where many puffin burrows have drowned.
National Trust

Record rainfall in England has battered some wildlife. The country's National Trust says the conditions — record rain in April and June and a very wet July — has been "almost apocalyptic."

Here's how the BBC describes the situation:

"The breeding season has been particularly catastrophic, with sea birds being blown off cliffs by gales and garden birds unable to find food for their young.

Read more

3:39pm

Mon July 16, 2012
Politics and Government

Wendy Long challenges Sen. Gillibrand's fiscal record

Wendy Long, the republican candidate for U.S. Senate, stands next to State Senator John DeFrancisco (R-Syracuse) during a press conference Monday.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Republican Senate candidate Wendy Long is challenging Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand's (D-NY) fiscal record.

Long stopped in Syracuse this afternoon on an upstate New York campaign swing.

Taxpayers in New York are sending too much money to Washington, Long contends.

Read more

3:17pm

Mon July 16, 2012
The Salt

Coney: The Hot Dog That Fed Detroit's American Dream

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 12:18 pm

Patrons pack in at American Coney in this undated photo. 1942
Courtesy Grace Keros

Take a hot dog from New York's famed Coney Island, throw in plenty of Greek immigrants and a booming auto industry, add some chili sauce, a steamed bun, chopped onions, mustard and an epic sibling rivalry and you've got the makings of a classic American melting pot story.

Read more

2:46pm

Mon July 16, 2012
Health

Plugging In For A Better Night's Sleep

High-tech gadgets, like smartphones, keep us connected at all hours and are making it more difficult to get a good night's sleep. But several new smartphone apps claim to help users sleep better. New York Times health and fitness reporter Anahad O'Connor explains the science behind apps.

2:27pm

Mon July 16, 2012
Africa

Kenya's Free Schools Bring A Torrent Of Students

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 6:22 pm

Kenya's attempt at universal education faces multiple challenges. In many rural areas, families want their kids to work during the day. At this school in central Kenya, Samburu kids who herd the family livestock are now taking classes in the evening.
Tony Karumba AFP/Getty Images

Parents of U.S. students often complain about things like too many standardized tests or unhealthful school lunches. Kenya wishes it had such problems.

Kenya dropped or greatly reduced fees at public schools nearly a decade ago in an effort to make education available to all children. On one level, it's been a success — school attendance has soared. Yet this has also exacerbated chronic problems that include shortages of qualified teachers, books, desks and just about every other basic need.

Read more

2:12pm

Mon July 16, 2012
Opinion

Op-Ed: 'Ban Penn State Football'

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 2:58 pm

Transcript

JENNIFER LUDDEN, HOST:

And now, The Opinion Page. A damning report last week found that four of the most powerful people at Penn State helped cover up the child sex-abuse allegations against former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky. The report charges the college with total disregard for the safety of the victims in an attempt to avoid bad press for the university. The university also faces civil suits over the abuses. So is that the end? Sports columnist Buzz Bissinger says it should only be the beginning.

Read more

2:07pm

Mon July 16, 2012
Law

Should Former Felons Have The Right To Vote?

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 3:15 pm

Transcript

JENNIFER LUDDEN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Jennifer Ludden in Washington. In a year where a tight presidential race could be determined by a few swing states, the issue of who is allowed to vote could turn the election, which is why recent moves in Florida and Iowa are getting so much attention.

Bucking a larger trend, these two states are making it harder for former felons to vote. This comes as a number of other states in recent years have made the process easier.

Read more

1:58pm

Mon July 16, 2012
NPR Story

Piecing Together Stories Of Families 'Lost In Slavery'

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 11:26 am

While many families were ripped apart, some were preserved. Charlie Crump, a former slave from North Carolina, kept ties with his granddaughter.
Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

For decades, slavery tore apart African-American families. Children were sold off from their mothers, and husbands were taken from their wives. Many desperately tried to keep track of each other, even running away to find loved ones. After the Civil War and emancipation, these efforts intensified. Freed slaves posted ads in newspapers and wrote letters — seeking any clue to a family member's whereabouts.

Read more

Pages