4:54am

Mon July 2, 2012
Around the Nation

Fly Fishermen Benefit From Low Stream Levels

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 7:23 am

One of Colorado's recreational industries is experiencing an early season boon because of this year's low snowpack and ever-worsening drought. Fly fishing enthusiasts are loving the low stream levels, and fly shops are filled with customers. From Aspen Public Radio, Luke Runyon reports.

4:54am

Mon July 2, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 7:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The chairman of the big British bank Barclays stepped down this morning. This comes just days after the bank agreed to pay British and U.S. regulators a total of $450 million, a fine to settle charges that Barclays' traders and executives had manipulated a key interest rate for profit.

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4:51am

Mon July 2, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 7:07 am

More than 70 years ago, Samsung started as a company which sold dried fish and fruit. Now Samsung sells everything from life insurance, to hotels and chemicals. It's one of South Korea's biggest companies. And, it's still run by the same family: the Lees.

4:51am

Mon July 2, 2012
Sports

100 Meters Runoff To Decide 3rd Place Finisher

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 7:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The 100 meters is the fastest running event in Olympic track and field. But for the last nine days, the women's 100 at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field trials in Eugene, Oregon has been stalled by a much talked about tie. Today, finally, a resolution. Sprinters Alyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh will race in a run-off to break their tie for third place in the 100 they first ran two Saturday's ago. First one to cross the finish line today makes the U.S. women's 100 team. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins us to talk about this.

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3:35am

Mon July 2, 2012
Science

Is The Hunt For The 'God Particle' Finally Over?

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 9:17 am

This image, from a sensor at the particle accelerator at CERN, is an example of the data signature a Higgs particle might generate.
CERN

Before we get to the fireworks on the Fourth of July, we might see some pyrotechnics from a giant physics experiment near Geneva, Switzerland.

Scientists there are planning to gather that morning to hear the latest about the decades-long search for a subatomic particle that could help explain why objects in our universe actually weigh anything.

The buzz is that they're closing in on the elusive Higgs particle. That would be a major milestone in the quest to understand the most basic nature of the universe.

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3:33am

Mon July 2, 2012
Crime In The City

Philly Author's 'Confession': I Lived These Stories

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 4:49 pm

Author Solomon Jones bases his work on his own experiences on the streets of Philadelphia.
Milton Perry

Philadelphia may be called the City of Brotherly Love, but author Solomon Jones sees the sadder, more complex side of the city.

Jones' books feature Philly police detective Mike Coletti. When we meet him in The Last Confession, he's on the verge of retirement, but before he can head off into the sunset, he's got to confront some demons from his past and catch a serial killer calling himself the Angel of Death.

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3:31am

Mon July 2, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Organ Donation Has Consequences Some Donors Aren't Prepared For

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 11:44 am

Most living kidney donors return to their daily lives in a matter of weeks, but for some, unforeseen physical and financial complications arise.
iStockphoto.com

Nearly a year and a half ago, Jeff Moyer donated a kidney. It's something he says changed his life forever. "Transplant surgery is a miracle," marvels Moyer. "I mean, to think that my kidney saved someone else's life — that's staggeringly wonderful."

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3:29am

Mon July 2, 2012
The Salt

Pie-Making 101: How I Overcame My Fear Of Crumbling Crust

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 11:27 am

CIA Instructor George Higgins checks the slices of pie made by students.
Allison Aubrey NPR

If you listen to my story on Morning Edition, you'll understand the generational divide that has led to my fear of making a pie crust.

So when I decided to overcome my fear, I did it the right way. I hopped on a train to the Culinary Institute of America, the nation's premier cooking school, in Hyde Park, N.Y. There I learned the foolproof pie crust formula that chef George Higgins teaches his students. "It starts with 3, 2, 1," he explains.

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11:20pm

Sun July 1, 2012
Regional Coverage

Why does Jefferson County receive a "failing grade" for air pollution?

Earlier this year, the American Lung Association unveiled an unpleasant surprise for Jefferson County residents. In a report on air quality across the country, the association gave the rural north country county a grade of "F" for ozone pollution, commonly known as smog. 

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5:05pm

Sun July 1, 2012
Why Music Matters

Breaking Records To A Velvet Underground Beat

Christian Niccum and Dan Joye at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Whistler, Canada.
Shaun Botterill Getty Images

Weekends on All Things Considered continues its "Why Music Matters" series with Olympic luger Christian Niccum. Niccum says music was the key to one of his first accomplishments in the sport.

"I was 15 years old, in Berchtesgaden in Germany," he says. "It's the oldest artificial luge track in the world, and it's also the most difficult."

Daunted by the course's many sharp turns, Niccum turned to something borrowed for inspiration.

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