2:30pm

Fri December 16, 2011
The Record

Music In Holiday Concerts Thorny Subject For Public Schools

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 12:59 pm

A choir in Little Rock, Ark., performs.
dlewis33 istockphoto.com

1:34pm

Fri December 16, 2011
Regional Coverage

Snow Scarcity at Nearby Ski Areas

Song Mountain Ski Resort owner Peter Harris predicts people will be skiing by Christmas.

"Everybody’s chomping at the bit, this time of year people are sick of golfing, they want to go skiing."

Peter says even without the natural snow, they just need a few days of sustained cold to cover the trails with man-made flakes.  He says they can definitely catch up on business.

"I’m certainly optimistic, it’s my 26th year in the business. Some winters start really early and end with a whimper, and other years start late and end with a bang."

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1:27pm

Fri December 16, 2011
The Two-Way

Citing Eurozone Crisis, Fitch Threatens Downgrade Of 6 EU Countries

Originally published on Fri December 16, 2011 1:29 pm

Fitch ratings agency, one of the big three, said today that it was considering downgrading the credit ratings of six Euro-zone countries. Italy, Spain, Ireland, Belgium, Slovenia and Cyprus could see their their rating cut by one or two notches.

The AP reports:

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1:00pm

Fri December 16, 2011
History

Science Diction: The Origin Of The Petri Dish

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

It's time for our monthly episode of Science Diction, where we explore the origins of scientific words with my guest Howard Markel, professor of history of medicine at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, also director of the Center for the History of Medicine there. He joins us WUOM. Welcome back, Howard.

HOWARD MARKEL: Good afternoon, Ira.

FLATOW: We have a very interesting word, or actually lab equipment today.

MARKEL: That we do. It's my favorite plate. It's the Petri dish.

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1:00pm

Fri December 16, 2011
Medical Treatments

Treating Stress, Speech Disorders With Music

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. You know that nice feeling you get when you listen to your favorite tune? What about music that can actually be medical therapy? It does exist. It's prescribed for illnesses from speech disorders to autism, Alzheimer's, even cancer.

Take the case of Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords. After she was shot in the head earlier this year, one way she learned to talk again was by singing her favorite songs, like this Cyndi Lauper tune.

(SOUNDBITE OF ABC BROADCAST )

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1:00pm

Fri December 16, 2011
NPR Story

What Makes Wings Work?

Researchers at New York University are studying flight with a speaker, a soup pot, straws and a box full of paper aircraft. Emeritus professor Stephen Childress describes the experiment and what he and his colleagues have learned about flight from their homemade flying objects.

1:00pm

Fri December 16, 2011
NPR Story

Exploring The Science Of Flying, From Your Window Seat

Originally published on Fri December 16, 2011 1:57 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This holiday season I'm sure is finding many of us on airplanes, flying around the country. It could take tedious hours of body scans, the crummy back-of-the-seat TV and scary airplane bumps and noises. But if you marvel at nature and technology, though, you can turn this torturous event into a more enjoyable learning experience.

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1:00pm

Fri December 16, 2011
NPR Story

Physicists Find 'Hints' of Elusive Higgs Boson

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Scientists have been searching for decades for a subatomic particle called the Higgs Boson. You've heard about it. It's been in the news, and you know, in theory, it explains why and how objects have mass.

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12:39pm

Fri December 16, 2011
The Two-Way

Family Of Agent Killed By 'Fast And Furious' Rifle Demands Accountability

Originally published on Fri December 16, 2011 3:19 pm

A year after Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry was killed by a weapon lost in a failed gunwalking operation, his family is calling on the U.S. government to hold those responsible accountable.

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12:32pm

Fri December 16, 2011
Remembrances

For Hitchens, In Life And Death, An Unaware Cosmos

Originally published on Fri December 16, 2011 10:29 pm

Christopher Hitchens, shown here in 2010, began a lifelong battle with a God he didn't believe in when he was just 9 years old.
David Levenson Getty Images

Writer Christopher Hitchens, who died on Thursday from complications of cancer at the age of 62, leaves behind some 18 books and countless essays on politics and public figures. But his most lasting legacy may be his atheism and his long-running duel with what he considered the world's most dangerous threat: religion.

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