1:48pm

Mon October 17, 2011
Middle East

Israel-Palestinian Prisoner Swap Stirs Strong Debate

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 12:05 pm

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Faizeh al-Maslamani (left) with her sister and a portrait of her husband, Ali, due to be released with more than 470 Palestinian prisoners Tuesday. Ali spent most of the past three decades in an Israeli jail. Faizeh says he has 10 grandchildren he's never seen. She hopes he'll accept "a life sentence in the house."

Peter Kenyon NPR

By a strong majority, Israelis support the decision to swap more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners for one Israeli soldier. Still, it has provoked a painful debate, one that played out Monday, as it has several times before when Israel made similar lopsided trades in the past.

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1:45pm

Mon October 17, 2011
The Two-Way

Head Of Walmart In China Resigns Amid Controversy

Walmart announced today that its chief executive in China was resigning for personal reasons. Ed Chan's resignation, however, comes about a week after China arrested Walmart employees and forced the retail giant to close 13 stores over allegations it was selling regular pork but labeling it as organic.

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1:08pm

Mon October 17, 2011
The Two-Way

Arab League Tells Syria To Reach A Cease-fire Deal Within 15 Days

On Sunday, the Arab League called a meeting to discuss whether to suspend Syria from the organization. When the meeting wrapped, reports the AP, the league — made up of 22 nations — made no mention of a suspension but asked the government of Bashar Assad to talk with his opposition and come to a cease-fire agreement within 15 days.

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1:00pm

Mon October 17, 2011
NPR Story

'West Side Story,' Still Pretty And Witty At 50

The film version of the acclaimed Broadway musical, West Side Story, premiered 50 years ago. The production, which set Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet against the backdrop of 1950s New York City, wasn't always a smash hit. Still, for many, the story holds up as well today as it did five decades ago.

1:00pm

Mon October 17, 2011
Opinion

Op-Ed: Occupy Wall Street Protesters' Goals

The Occupy Wall Street protests reached the one-month mark, and spread to cities around the world. Demonstrators march against greedy bankers, politicians, government cuts and the growing gap between rich and poor, among other issues. They have raised nearly $300,000, but many wonder: To what end?

1:00pm

Mon October 17, 2011
Business

Mid-Sized — Not Small — Business Drives Economy

So-called "middle market" companies added 2 million workers in recent years. The middle market includes businesses with annual sales between $10 million and $1 billion. Despite their growth, they tend to lack the lobbyists, government supporters and associations that small and big businesses enjoy.

12:00pm

Mon October 17, 2011
Music

In Your Ear: Jay Holcey

As part of Tell Me More's occasional series "In Your Ear," NPR member station WVAS Music Director Jay Holcey shares his favorite tunes. That includes "Grandma's Hands" by Bill Withers and "Falling in Love with Jesus" by Kirk Whalum.

12:00pm

Mon October 17, 2011
The Two-Way

BlackBerry Customers Offered Free Apps As Apology

Damien Meyer AFP/Getty Images

Last week, Research in Motion apologized for the service outages that swept around the world last week, leaving millions of its BlackBerry users unable to send or receive messages.

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12:00pm

Mon October 17, 2011
World

'The Learning': Social Costs Of Teaching Abroad

In the new film The Learning, four teachers leave their close families in the Philippines to work in Baltimore, where wages are up to 25 times higher than what's offered at home. They persist to overcome cultural differences, bring order to classrooms and form meaningful bonds with American students. The film reflects a shift in education — a century ago, Americans set up schools in the Philippines, but U.S. has now been recruiting Filipinos to teach in the states. Michel Martin hears from director Ramona Diaz.

12:00pm

Mon October 17, 2011
On Aging

At End Of Life ... Soaring Prices, Sinking Resources

Tell Me More begins its week-long series on the end of life. Monday's focus: money. About 25 percent of all Medicare spending is on end-of-life care, and a private room in a nursing home averages more than $80,000 a year. Michel Martin talks with NPR Health Policy Correspondent Julie Rovner, National Alliance for Hispanic Health President Jane Delgado, and National Caucus and Center on Black Aged, Inc. President Karyne Jones.

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