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8:00am

Sat February 25, 2012
Middle East

Israel-Iran Relations: A Native Poet's Perspective

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 5:18 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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8:00am

Sat February 25, 2012
Europe

A Silk Road To A Greek Town's Recovery

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 5:18 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The northeastern Greek town of Soufli flourished in the 19th century because of its vibrant silk trade. Silk farming declined in the 20th century with the invention of synthetic silk, but a few families have hung on. Despite the economic crisis, one of those families opened a silk museum in the hopes of drawing tourists and life back to a forgotten Greek town.

Joanna Kakissis sent us this postcard.

(SOUNDBITE OF A SONG)

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8:00am

Sat February 25, 2012
Simon Says

Other People's Atrocities: None Of Our Business?

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 5:18 pm

Protesters demonstrate against Foxconn, which manufactures Apple products in China, outside an Apple retail outlet in Hong Kong.
Antony Dickson AFP/Getty Images

Events as disparate as the cruel, escalating violence in Syria and the congested, unnerving conditions where Apple's iPads and iPhones are made at the Foxconn assembly plants in China raise a recurring question:

When do a country's internal affairs become the business of the world? And when do we make that our personal business?

You can take that question back through atrocities, crimes and outrages of recent history.

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8:00am

Sat February 25, 2012
From Our Listeners

Your Letters: Trekkers Unite To Correct Error

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 5:18 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Time now for your letters.

(SOUNDBITE OF TYPING AND MUSIC)

SIMON: Today a correction, so maybe some music that's a little more suitable.

(SOUNDBITE OF KLINGON BATTLE THEME)

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6:17am

Sat February 25, 2012
Author Interviews

'Watergate' Revisited: Inside The Criminal Minds

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 5:18 pm

Associated Press

During the summer of 1972, five men were arrested in the middle of the night for breaking into the Democratic Party headquarters at the Watergate office building in Washington, D.C.

The breach went to the very top. Watergate toppled the Nixon administration and became an iconic (and exhaustively studied) American political scandal. In his new novel, Watergate, Thomas Mallon gives the story a fresh twist, retelling it from the perspectives of the involved parties — from seven different points of view.

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6:13am

Sat February 25, 2012
Environment

Who's A Park For? Dog Owners Fight Park Service

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 5:18 pm

Rancho Corral de Tierra Park in Northern California recently became part of the National Parks System. Now dogs are required to be on leash, angering some community members.
Amy Standen KQED

Golden Gate National Recreation Area in California's Bay Area is expanding, quite literally, up next to some people's backyards. And while you might think neighbors would be thrilled to see this scenic landscape preserved, the relationship between the National Park Service and locals is off to a rocky start.

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6:12am

Sat February 25, 2012
Arts & Life

In Tombstone, The O.K. Corral Still Looms Large

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 5:18 pm

Tourists in Tombstone visit the O.K. Corral exhibits.
Gillian Ferris Kohl

In the late 1880s, a silver strike turned the dusty town of Tombstone, Ariz., into a cosmopolitan hot spot. There were casinos, oyster bars and shops filled with the latest Paris fashions.

But when the silver ran out, Tombstone almost died. Only one thing has kept it alive for the past century: the 1881 shootout at the O.K. Corral, re-enacted daily.

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6:11am

Sat February 25, 2012
Middle East

In Egypt, Christian-Muslim Tension Is On The Rise

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 5:18 pm

A Coptic Christian man holds a cross made of flowers during a clash between Christians and Muslims in Cairo in November. Relations are becoming more strained between the two communities, and there has been periodic violence.
Khalil Hamra AP

Blackened rubble is all that is left of Abskharon Suleiman's appliance store in the northern Egyptian village of Sharbat.

Suleiman is a Coptic Christian, and his upstairs apartment, as well as his children's homes and shops, were gutted and looted in an attack last month by young Muslim men.

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6:11am

Sat February 25, 2012
Middle East

Clinton Steps Up Calls For A Halt To Violence In Syria

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 5:18 pm

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during a press conference at a conference on Syria in Tunis, Tunisia, on Friday. The participants were united in their calls for a ceasefire and for Syrian President Bashar Assad to allow humanitarian aid into his country.
EPA /Landov

Syrians are looking to the world in their hour of need and "we cannot let them down," U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Friday at an international conference on Syria held in Tunisia.

The dozens of countries represented at the conference, Clinton said, are united in their demands: Syrian President Bashar Assad must allow much-needed aid to his people and silence his guns or face more isolation and pressure.

But debate continues over what other steps countries in the region could take.

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6:10am

Sat February 25, 2012
Arts & Life

Athena's Library, The Quirky Pillar Of Providence

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:02 am

Chilean artist Magaly Ponce looks out from the mezzanine at the Oscar Wilde party at the Providence Athenaeum.
NPR

With a bit of reverence, librarians carefully wind an antique library clock near the circulation desk in a temple of learning called the Providence Athenaeum.

This is one of the oldest libraries in the United States, a 19th-century library with the soul of a 21st-century rave party. In fact, the Rhode Island institution has been called a national model for civic engagement.

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6:10am

Sat February 25, 2012
Education

Saving Kansas City Schools Means Rescuing A City

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 5:18 pm

Kansas City public schools have lost accreditation. The city is struggling with how to move forward, especially since education impacts many aspects of the area's development.
Tom Bullock NPR

The entire public school system in Kansas City, Mo., has flunked.

The state board of education revoked its accreditation on Jan. 1. Public schools met just three of the 14 standards set by the board for basic proficiency. They received failing grades for attendance, graduation rates, plus math and reading and writing scores.

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6:09am

Sat February 25, 2012
Presidential Race

On Romney's Michigan Tour, A Change Of Pace

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 5:18 pm

Mitt Romney greets patrons at a restaurant called The Mitt in Mount Clemens, Mich., on Friday. The candidate hasn't done as much handshaking lately, given the size of the recent primary states.
Gerald Herbert AP

Mitt Romney is on a bus tour across Michigan, hoping to win the votes of the state where he grew up. With primary day on Tuesday, Romney seems to have closed the gap in polls with Rick Santorum.

This trip has the feel of those early days campaigning back in New Hampshire, before any votes were actually cast: the long bus rides, the snowy landscape, even the impromptu restaurant drop-ins.

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4:00am

Sat February 25, 2012
A Blog Supreme

Shannon Powell: New Orleans Rhythm, Straight From The Source

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 5:18 pm

Shannon Powell performs with the Palm Court Jazz Band at the 2010 New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival.
Clayton Call Redferns

It is said of Shannon Powell that he's part of New Orleans' musical DNA — that he knows things only local drummers know.

Powell, 49, is the A-list drummer in town. He's played with Dr. John, Harry Connick Jr., Nicholas Payton, R&B guitarist Earl King and Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra.

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7:46pm

Fri February 24, 2012
Music Interviews

Robert Glasper: A Unified Field Theory For Black Music

Originally published on Sat February 25, 2012 6:31 pm

Robert Glasper leads his band through experiments in jazz, hip-hop, R&B and rock on his new album, Black Radio.
Mike Schreiber

When some of the biggest names in R&B and hip-hop are clamoring to be on a jazz record, you know you're dealing with a special kind of jazz musician.

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6:46pm

Fri February 24, 2012
The Two-Way

Gadhafi's Compound, Slowly Being Erased From History

Libyans attend the Friday market the gardens inside the Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli, on Oct. 28, 2011.
Marco Longari AFP/Getty Images

"I don't know why the traffic is like this," he said. "It's Friday just before prayers; where are all these people going?"

My friend Emad and I had been driving around the perimeter of Bab al-Azizia, Gadhafi's notorious compound just outside downtown Tripoli. It was here that NATO concentrated many of its bombing runs, as did President Reagan in the 1980s. Now the outer walls are a crumbling mess, covered with anti-Gadhafi graffiti.

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6:01pm

Fri February 24, 2012
Around the Nation

N.J.: NYPD Crossed The Line In Monitoring Muslims

Originally published on Fri February 24, 2012 8:37 pm

Mohamed El filali, of the Islamic Center of Passaic County, gathers with Muslim students and community leaders in Newark on Friday to address the monitoring of New Jersey Muslims by the NYPD.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Ever since Sept. 11, the New York Police Department has been aggressively gathering intelligence to help prevent another terrorist attack.

Now, those tactics are provoking new controversy in New Jersey after The Associated Press published a confidential, 60-page NYPD report from 2007 containing detailed information on dozens of mosques and Muslim-owned businesses in nearby Newark.

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5:57pm

Fri February 24, 2012
The Message Machine

2012 Political TV: Ads, Lies And Videotape

Originally published on Fri February 24, 2012 6:37 pm

An image from a superPAC ad attacking Newt Gingrich, whose campaign called on TV stations to pull the ad off the air.
Restore Our Future

5:19pm

Fri February 24, 2012
All Tech Considered

Google's Goggles: Is The Future Right Before Our Eyes?

What would the world look like seen through Google's eyes?
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Like flying cars and time travel, eye glasses with computing power have long been sci-fi fantasy, relegated to Terminator movies and the like. Now it appears that Google may be a few months from selling a version of their own.

Google glasses — which may be released as a "beta" product — could put smartphone capabilities such as GPS maps, weather, time, Web streaming and more inches from your eyeball.

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5:13pm

Fri February 24, 2012
NPR Story

One Of Last Movie Theater Organs Pipes On

Seattle has one of the country's few working movie theater organs. Jim Riggs plays the theater's Wurlitzer organ while silent movies are screened. Recently he performed during a screening of 1927's Wings, the only silent film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture.

5:10pm

Fri February 24, 2012
The Two-Way

Syrian Official: Army Is Protecting Syrian People From Armed Groups

Zouheir Jabbour says many of the videos and images coming out of Syria are a fabrication. Here, a badly injured man lies in a bed at a makeshift clinic in the Syrian city of Idlib on Friday.
Bulent Kilic AFP/Getty Images

The charge d'affaires of the Syrian Embassy in Washington says all the reports coming out of Syria are "absolutely wrong."

Zouheir Jabbour told All Things Considered's Melissa Block that even the reports issued by the United Nations and the Arab League are wrong.

"In the time of computers, you can fabricate whatever you like and go to Al Jazeera and go to Al Arabiya and you can see all that fabrication," Jabbour said.

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4:53pm

Fri February 24, 2012
The Two-Way

Monsanto Agrees To Pay Up $93 Million In Agent Orange Settlement

We are getting more details about that preliminary agreement to settle an "Agent Orange" related class-action lawsuit filed against the Monsanto Company. We reported yesterday that Monsanto agreed to settle a case over pollution claims made on behalf of current and former residents of the small town of Nitro, West Virginia.

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4:42pm

Fri February 24, 2012
The Salt

Menu Math: When Counting Fast Food Calories Requires A Calculator

Calorie counts like the one on this McDonald's drive-thru in New York are intended to help people make healthier choices. But researchers say they're often too confusing.
Ed Ou AP

It's a simple enough idea: Know how many calories are in those fast food meals, and you'll make a better choice between them.

But when students at the Columbia University School of Nursing tried to nail down the calories on 70 menus at 12 eateries in New York's Harlem neighborhood, they found it pretty much impossible, even with a calculator.

One big problem: Many items are listed with a calorie range, but with no clues as to how those ranges are determined. For example:

  • A bucket of chicken was 2,200 to 5,860 calories.

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4:36pm

Fri February 24, 2012
It's All Politics

Fred Who? He's Republican, He's Gay, And He's Competing For Michigan Delegates

Originally published on Fri February 24, 2012 6:36 pm

GOP presidential candidate Fred Karger hopes Michigan's primary rules will allow him to pick up a few delegates to the national convention. He's focusing on just one congressional district in the center of the state.
Rick Pluta for NPR

4:25pm

Fri February 24, 2012
Middle East

Syrian Official Says Media Coverage Is Manipulated

Melissa Block talks to Zouheir Jabbour, Chief of Mission of the Syrian Embassy in Washington, DC, about the call for a ceasefire in Homs and the allegations of atrocities by the Syrian regime.

3:44pm

Fri February 24, 2012
The Two-Way

U.N. Report: Iran Has Ramped Up Production Of Enriched Uranium

A new report by the United Nations' nuclear agency claims that Iran has ramped up production of a purer form of enriched uranium over the past few months. The report by the International Atomic Energy Agency was obtained by The Associated Press and other news outlets and it's likely to further suspicions from Western countries that Iran might be working on a nuclear weapon.

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3:29pm

Fri February 24, 2012
National Security

Hezbollah Suspect May Face U.S. Military Commission

Originally published on Fri February 24, 2012 4:18 pm

U.S. Brig. Gen. Kevin Bergner speaks in Baghdad in July 2007 near a poster of Ali Musa Daqduq. Daqduq was captured in Iraq in March 2007, and is accused of orchestrating the killings of five U.S. soldiers. The U.S. left Daqduq in Iraqi custody when U.S. troops formally withdrew in December. But the Obama administration is seeking to try him before a military commission.
Wsthiq Khuzaie AP

The Obama administration is seeking to try a Lebanese man linked to Hezbollah in a military commission, expanding the reach of the military tribunal beyond al-Qaida and Taliban suspects for the first time.

The man at the center of the case is Ali Musa Daqduq. He was the last detainee held by American forces in Iraq and had been turned over to Iraqi custody when U.S. forces formally withdrew from Iraq in December.

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3:05pm

Fri February 24, 2012
The Two-Way

Syria: Red Cross Begins Evacuating Injured From Homs

The International Committee of the Red Cross said today that its crews had reached the restive city of Homs in Syria and they have begun evacuating some of those injured by the shelling.

The Telegraph reports that the Red Cross said two wounded Western journalists were were evacuated, as well as the body of two others. The Telegraph adds:

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3:00pm

Fri February 24, 2012
NPR Story

Why Woody Allen Is Always MIA At Oscars

Filmmaker Woody Allen is notorious for not attending the Oscars each year, despite his numerous nominations.

3:00pm

Fri February 24, 2012
NPR Story

'Friends Of Syria' Group Calls For Ceasefire

Representatives from some 70 countries met in Tunis on Friday and issued an ultimatum to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad, demanding an immediate ceasefire and humanitarian access to cities like Homs that have been under bombardment by the Syrian army. Audie Cornish talks to Michele Kelemen about the news.

3:00pm

Fri February 24, 2012
NPR Story

Correcting A National Record Literally Set In Stone

The Martin Luther King Jr. memorial isn't the only monument in Washington, DC, that has grappled with how to make a correction. At the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, there are more than 58,000 names inscribed on the wall. More than 100 of them have been misspelled, but 62 have been fixed. Memorial fund president Jan Scruggs explains how they've made the corrections.

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