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7:30am

Tue February 7, 2012
The Two-Way

As Gunfire Echoes Inside Syria, A Cry For Help From A City Under Attack

With heavy machine gun fire in the background as he spoke from the Baba Amr section of Homs, Syrian citizen journalist and blogger Omar Shakir told Morning Edition co-host Renee Montagne earlier today that "we are asking for [an] SOS" and help from the International Red Cross to stop what he said has been the deadly shelling of his city by forces loyal to President Bashar Assad.

"There is no one with us," Shakir said.

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6:03am

Tue February 7, 2012
Author Interviews

Mumbai Slum Exists 'Behind The Beautiful Forevers'

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 10:29 am

Katherine Boo won a Pulitzer Prize for her reporting on abuse and neglect in group homes. A staff writer for The New Yorker, she is also the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship.
Heleen Welvaart

Next to Mumbai's bustling international airport, a boy picks through refuse, looking for pieces he can recycle and sell to support his family of 11. He is a resident of Annawadi, a slum built on a patch of reclaimed swampland — now fringed by luxury hotels.

As economists and activists fret over increasing income inequality in America, scenes like this one from journalist Katherine Boo's new book, Behind the Beautiful Forevers, are a forceful reminder of the extreme disparity of wealth that exist all over the world — and what people must do to survive.

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4:00am

Tue February 7, 2012
Business

Greek Debt Talks Continue

Reporter Joanna Kakissis in Athens has the latest on the nail-biting negotiations over the Greek debt.

4:00am

Tue February 7, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 6:50 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And let's move now, from paper promises, now, to plastic. That's our last word in business.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Citigroup says it has become the first Western bank with permission to issue credit cards under its own brand in China. Until now, China required western banks to co-brand with Chinese operators.

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4:00am

Tue February 7, 2012
Middle East

Syrian Violence Continues In Homs

Activists say dozens of people were killed yesterday in the Syrian town of Homs when government troops opened fire with tanks and machine guns. More than a dozen others were killed elsewhere. Renee Montagne talks to Omar Shakir, a human rights activist, who is in Homs.

4:00am

Tue February 7, 2012
Sports

Sports News The Super Bowl May Have Overshadowed

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 7:19 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It is estimated that more than 111 million people watched Sunday's Super Bowl. That is the biggest TV audience ever for the championship game. And with all the hype before and even after the match-up between the Giants and the Patriots, other sports were drowned out. NPR's Tom Goldman is going to help correct that. He's here to bring us up to date on some other sports news.

Hi, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Good morning.

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4:00am

Tue February 7, 2012
Health

States Propose Taxing Sugar To Aid In Nutrition Warning

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 9:16 am

New research indicates excessive consumption of sugar leads to an increase in all kinds of chronic diseases. But how much sugar is too much? Would making sugary foods more expensive help to get consumers to cut back?

4:00am

Tue February 7, 2012
Election 2012

GOP Rivals Campaign In Minnesota Ahead Of Caucuses

Minnesota holds non-binding GOP caucuses Tuesday. Newt Gingrich, Rick Santorum and Ron Paul all campaigned in the state Monday. Each of front-runner Mitt Romney's rivals is looking at the state as a place where they can regain their footing.

3:56am

Tue February 7, 2012
Books

Amid Debt Crisis, A Trail Of Broken 'Promises'

Philip Coggan
Nephi Niven Public Affairs Books

Financial writer Philip Coggan traces the current global financial crisis to the 1970s, when the U.S. went off the gold standard.

"Up till then, every form of money had some link to precious metal: gold or silver," Coggan, author of a new book, Paper Promises: Debt, Money and the New World Order, tells Morning Edition co-host Renee Montagne.

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3:47am

Tue February 7, 2012
Around the Nation

China's Heir Apparent Rekindles Early Ties To Iowa

During his pending trip to the United States, Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping hopes to reunite with Iowans he met back in 1985, during an agricultural mission to America. Here, Xi attends a meeting with Vice President Joe Biden last August.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

China's Vice President Xi Jinping is coming to America. Next week, he'll meet with President Obama at the White House. He'll lead a trade delegation to California. And he also plans to make a stop in Muscatine, Iowa.

Why Muscatine? It turns out that Xi wants to catch up with old acquaintances — he first visited the town (population 22,886) in the 1980s, as part of an agricultural mission.

Back then, the man who is likely to soon become China's president had dinner with Sarah Lande and her husband.

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12:01am

Tue February 7, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney Brings Up Religion To Attract Social Conservatives

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 8:52 am

GOP presidential front-runner Mitt Romney is reaching out to social conservatives in a new way. At a rally in the gym at Arapahoe High School in Centennial, Colo., Monday night, Romney rolled out some new material: the rights given to people by God.

"I am just distressed as I watch, as I watch our president try and infringe upon those rights," Romney said to the capacity crowd. "The first amendment of the Constitution provides the right to worship in the way of our own choice."

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12:01am

Tue February 7, 2012
Latin America

Drought Ravages Farms Across Wide Swath Of Mexico

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 4:51 am

A vulture picks at a dead steer. Ranchers say many cattle have died because of the drought that has ravaged much of Mexico.
Jason Beaubien NPR

In the central Mexican state of Zacatecas, 76-year-old Genaro Rodarte Huizar rides his donkey along a dry riverbed. On his left is a dried out pasture; on his right is what used to be a cornfield; now it's just long furrows of gray, dusty dirt.

Rodarte says that for the past two years, the crops that he's planted here have failed. Normally, he plants beans and corn to feed his family, and oats to sell. He says he hasn't harvested anything because the land is too dry and there's no water.

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12:01am

Tue February 7, 2012
Latin America

United Opposition A Challenge To Venezuela's Chavez

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 4:51 am

Venezuelan opposition leader Henrique Capriles (center) waves to supporters on Oct. 12, 2011. Capriles is the front-runner in the opposition primary election to pick a candidate to run against President Hugo Chavez. The primary is scheduled for Feb. 12.
Ariana Cubillos AP

The opposition to Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has tried everything to end his long rule: huge protests, a coup and an oil strike. Nothing has worked, but now opposition leaders have coalesced into a united and focused movement that is preparing to choose one candidate to run against the president, posing the strongest electoral challenge to Chavez's populist rule.

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12:01am

Tue February 7, 2012
Middle East

Jews With Ties To Iran And Israel Feel Conflicted

Iranian-born Menashe Amir (shown here in 2006) hosts a call-in show on Israel Radio's Farsi service, one of the few forums for direct discourse between Iranians and Israelis.
Gali Tibbon Getty Images

As tensions between Israel and Iran ratchet up, one community is caught in the middle: Iranian Jews living in Israel. There are some 250,000 people of Persian descent living in Israel, and they maintain strong ties with their homeland.

As a result, they are uniquely conflicted over the possibility of war between the two countries.

In a small cluttered apartment in Jerusalem, Naheet Yacoubi cooks a traditional Persian meal for her Shabbat dinner. Originally from Tehran, she came to Israel when she was a child.

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12:01am

Tue February 7, 2012
Education

UC Students Propose Alternative To Tuition Increases

A student prepares to speak in opposition to proposed tuition increases at a University of California Board of Regents meeting in July 2011.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Chris LoCascio, a junior at UC Riverside, feared that there was no end in sight for tuition increases at the University of California. The state kept cutting subsidies, students kept protesting, but no one had any answers. So he and other students decided to turn the discussion on its head.

What if, he says, "instead of charging students upfront for their education, students would attend the UC with no upfront costs whatsoever"?

Under the Fix UC proposal, the bill would not come due until students graduate and start making money.

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12:01am

Tue February 7, 2012
Around the Nation

Alabama's Immigration Law May Get A Second Look

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 1:00 pm

Protesters march outside Alabama's Capitol in Montgomery on Nov. 15 during a demonstration against the state's immigration law.
Dave Martin AP

Whoever said "all P.R. is good P.R." probably never had dozens of protesters gathered in front of the office calling them "Hitler."

That's what happened during a recent lunchtime in the Birmingham, Ala., business district, as students from several local colleges held a mock funeral in front of a bank. They accuse the company of funding private detention centers where they claim illegal immigrants have died.

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6:44pm

Mon February 6, 2012
The Two-Way

Remembering Roger Boisjoly: He Tried To Stop Shuttle Challenger Launch

Engineer Roger Boisjoly examines a model of the O-Rings, used to bring the Space Shuttle into orbit, at a meeting of senior executives and academic representatives in Rye, New York in Sept. 1991.
AP

Roger Boisjoly was a booster rocket engineer at NASA contractor Morton Thiokol in Utah in January, 1986, when he and four colleagues became embroiled in the fatal decision to launch the Space Shuttle Challenger.

Boisjoly was also one of two confidential sources quoted by NPR three weeks later in the first detailed report about the Challenger launch decision, and the stiff resistance by Boisjoly and other Thiokol engineers.

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6:13pm

Mon February 6, 2012
The Two-Way

Heartbreak And Victory, Kyle Stanley's Week In The PGA

Professional golfer Kyle Stanley will forever remember Super Bowl Sunday 2012. And not because he's an over-the-top New York Giants — or Madonna — fan.

But because he won the unglamorously-named Waste Management Phoenix Open on Sunday. And for Stanley, there was nothing trashy about his final round 65 that secured a one-shot victory and his first on the PGA tour.

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5:31pm

Mon February 6, 2012
The Two-Way

Greece Delays Decision On Terms Of Bailout

IMF representative Bob Traa is seen inside an elevator as he arrives a government office building before meeting Greek Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos in Athens on Monday.
Petros Giannakouris AP

Much to the dismay of the economic world, Greece said it was delaying negotiations on the terms of its bailout package today. Basically, Greece's political leaders could not agree on accepting tough, new austerity measures that are tied to receiving the 130 billion euro bailout.

The Guardian reports:

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5:25pm

Mon February 6, 2012
Election 2012

In Battleground Colorado, Independents On The Rise

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 7:33 pm

An attendee holds American flags during a rally Saturday in Colorado Springs, Colo. The rally was for Republican Mitt Romney, but a new study says the number of newly declared independents is outpacing new registration for either Republicans or Democrats in the state.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

At the upscale Cherry Creek Mall in Denver, Scott Kardos, 24, said he's not interested in being either a Democrat or a Republican.

"I don't really identify with either party," said Kardos, a recent college graduate with an electrical engineering degree, who was shopping with his girlfriend and her parents. "A lot of the things I agree with the Republican side, and a lot of things I agree on the Democrat side. So, can't really decide on either one, and I flip-flop pretty much every other election on who I'd rather vote for."

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5:23pm

Mon February 6, 2012
It's All Politics

Fight For GOP Soul, SuperPACs Spur Negative Political Ad Explosion

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 7:08 pm

Anyone already fatigued from the high rate of negative political ads on TV and radio may want to turn off all their electronics until after Election Day.

Because there's room for it to get significantly worse, Vanderbilt University political scientist John Geer told All Things Considered co-host Audie Cornish Monday.

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4:46pm

Mon February 6, 2012
The Picture Show

'Boxing Is The Love Of My Life': A Woman Fights For A Shot At Gold

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:02 am

"When I get in the ring, what am I telling myself? 'Stay calm. Stay calm! This is my ticket,' " says boxer Tyrieshia Douglas.
Sue Jaye Johnson
  • Hear Marianne McCune's Report On 'All Things Considered'

When she was 16, Tyrieshia Douglas was arrested for street fighting. As she remembers it, her juvenile court judge recommended she take up boxing. Now she's a 23-year-old living in Baltimore with her heart set on winning one of the first gold medals in women's boxing, a sport that will make its Olympic debut this summer.

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4:40pm

Mon February 6, 2012
Middle East

U.S. Aid At Risk As Egypt Targets Democracy Groups

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 7:33 pm

Egyptian police raid a nongovernmental organization office in Cairo last December. Egyptian investigating judges on Sunday referred 43 NGO workers, including 19 Americans, to trial before a criminal court for allegedly being involved in banned activities and illegally receiving foreign funds, security officials said.
Mohammed Asad AP

In a rapidly escalating dispute between allies, 43 people, including 19 Americans, are to face trial in Egypt for their work in promoting democracy. They include the son of U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood.

Sam LaHood was running the Cairo office of the International Republican Institute. The case against him and others has caused a furious reaction in Washington — with lawmakers threatening to hold up U.S. aid to Egypt.

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4:33pm

Mon February 6, 2012
Author Interviews

Is White, Working Class America 'Coming Apart'?

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 7:33 pm

According to the libertarian social scientist Charles Murray, America is "coming apart at the seams." Class strain has cleaved society into two groups, he argues in his new book Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010: an upper class, defined by educational attainment, and a new lower class, characterized by the lack of it. Murray also posits that the new "lower class" is less industrious, less likely to marry and raise children in a two-parent household, and more politically and socially disengaged

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4:19pm

Mon February 6, 2012
All Tech Considered

Where Eye Care Is A Luxury, Technology Offers Access

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 7:33 pm

A man from Liberia uses a pump to adjust his liquid silicon lens. Liquid-lens glasses are part of an effort to make eyewear more accessible in the developing world.
Courtesy of Centre for Vision in the Developing World

For millions of people in the developing world, one thing stands between them and a job or an education: a good pair of glasses. Quality eye care is often a luxury in areas where health services are scarce. So researchers and entrepreneurs are looking for breakthrough technologies to bring the cost of glasses and eye exams way down.

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4:13pm

Mon February 6, 2012
Latin America

U.S. Travel To Cuba Grows As Restrictions Are Eased

The U.S. government has restricted travel to Cuba for a half-century. However, the Obama administration has gone back to a Clinton-era policy that eased some limitations, and some 400,000 Americans visited Cuba last year.
Grand Circle Foundation PRNewsFoto

Cuba is the only country in the world the U.S. government restricts its own citizens from visiting. Americans can go to Burma, Iran, even North Korea if those places give them a visa.

The Obama administration has now relaxed travel rules for Cuba, leading to a surge in U.S.-government approved tours to the island. But in the U.S., some lawmakers staunchly opposed to the Castro government say the travel programs are filled with heavy doses of propaganda.

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4:10pm

Mon February 6, 2012
Around the Nation

Helicopter Parents Hover In The Workplace

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 7:33 pm

As the millennial generation enters the workforce, employers report that parents are taking an increasingly active role advocating on behalf of their children.
Images Bazaar Getty Images

So-called helicopter parents first made headlines on college campuses a few years ago, when they began trying to direct everything from their children's course schedules to which roommate they were assigned.

With millennial children now in their 20s, more helicopter parents are showing up in the workplace, sometimes even phoning human resources managers to advocate on their child's behalf.

Megan Huffnagle, a former human resources manager at a Denver theme park, recalls being shocked several years ago when she received a call from a young job applicant's mother.

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4:00pm

Mon February 6, 2012
The Salt

In Indianapolis, Super Bowl Leftovers Are All Gone (To The Hungry)

A platter of wraps for a Super Bowl party.
JOHN BERRY The Post-Standard /Landov

The Super Bowl party is over, and that means refrigerators around the country today are jammed with uneaten Frito pies, fried chicken, and seven-layer dips – remnants of one of the most gluttonous days of the year.

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3:59pm

Mon February 6, 2012
The Two-Way

In New Book, Former White House Intern Details Her Alleged Affair With JFK

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 4:04 pm

Mimi Alford in an interview with Rock Center.
Screenshot NBC News

The New York Post has gotten their hands on a new memoir from a woman called Mimi Alford in which the now 68-year-old grandmother details an 18-month affair with President John F. Kennedy.

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3:34pm

Mon February 6, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

Violinist Anne Akiko Meyers: From Playing In Knee Socks To Owning Two Strads

Violinist Anne Akiko Meyers.
Lisa-Marie Mazzucco courtesy of the artist

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