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6:20pm

Wed January 25, 2012
The Salt

Alice Waters: Picture Perfect As The Constant Gardener

Chefs Jose Andres and Alice Waters pose along side her newly installed portrait, by photographer Dave Woody, at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, on Jan. 20, 2012.
John Rose NPR

Alice Waters has moved from the kitchen to the garden to the soap box in her 40 years as a pioneer of the sustainable and locally grown food movement. But on one recent night, The Salt found her "hanging" in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington.

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6:01pm

Wed January 25, 2012
Business

Shoe Company Practices Insourcing For The Sole

Keen's Portland, Ore., factory is equipped to build up to 1.5 million pairs of shoes a year.
Courtesy of Keen

The American economy lost more than 5,000 jobs to offshore outsourcing in 2010, and in Tuesday's State of the Union address President Obama made it clear that he wants them back.

"We can't bring every job back that's left our shores," he said. "But right now, it's getting more expensive to do business in places like China. Meanwhile, America is more productive."

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5:51pm

Wed January 25, 2012
Presidential Race

Rep. Ron Paul: The Interview Transcript

Robert Siegel interviewed Rep. Ron Paul on All Things Considered on Jan. 25. This is an edited transcript of their conversation.

ROBERT SIEGEL: Representative Paul, welcome to the program once again.

REPRESENTATIVE RON PAUL (R-TX): Thank you. Good to be with you.

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5:35pm

Wed January 25, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Start Early To Curb Heart Risks For A Lifetime

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 7:03 pm

Yvan Dub iStockphoto.com

Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the U.S. But who's at the most risk?

A study in the lastest New England Journal of Medicine offers a simple way to predict the risk of a fatal or debilitating heart attack or stroke for a middle-aged person over the rest of his or her life.

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5:13pm

Wed January 25, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

With Age, Men May Lose Thinking Ability Faster Than Women

Physical health problems may help drive men's mental decline.
iStockphoto.com

Men are more apt than women to lose thinking ability as they age, according to new research. And that mild cognitive impairment often leads to dementia.

But people can reduce their risk of mild cognitive impairment by staying healthy and educated, according to Rosebud Roberts, a professor of epidemiology at the Mayo Clinic who led the study. "There is a lot that people can do," she told Shots.

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5:04pm

Wed January 25, 2012
It's All Politics

Taking His Economic Message On The Road, Obama Touts Factory Jobs In Iowa

President Obama tours Conveyor Engineering and Manufacturing in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Wednesday.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

A day after delivering his State of the Union address to Congress, President Obama took his message on the road. Obama hoped that stops at manufacturing sites in Iowa and Arizona would drive home his point that the government should do more to encourage factory jobs.

The three-day trip also includes stops in Colorado, Nevada and Michigan. Those are all states likely to be important in the November election.

Obama kicked off his road trip at Conveyor Engineering and Manufacturing, a factory in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

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4:55pm

Wed January 25, 2012
The Two-Way

Treasury Secretary Geithner Doesn't Expect To Be Part Of A Second Term

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 5:26 pm

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner told Bloomberg Television today that he's "pretty confident" he won't be asked to stay in his job if President Obama is re-elected for a second term.

"He's not going to ask me to stay on, I'm pretty confident," Geithner said. "I'm confident he'll be president. But I'm also confident he's going to have the privilege of having another secretary of the treasury."

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4:38pm

Wed January 25, 2012
The Salt

Antitrust Official Gets Stampeded By Big Beef

Originally published on Thu January 26, 2012 10:34 am

At sale barns, like this one in Kingsville, Mo., cattlemen still bid openly for breeding stock. Meatpackers once bought on the open market, too.
Frank Morris for NPR

Dudley Butler is quitting his job tomorrow. Never heard of him? He's President Obama's appointee to run the division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture that governs antitrust issues in the meat industry. He was part of a cadre of high-level bureaucrats charged to expose and fight agribusiness monopolies. In fact, he was the last of that group.

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4:06pm

Wed January 25, 2012
Europe

At The Louvre, A Rare Showcase For American Art

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 7:03 pm

An exhibit at the Louvre Museum in Paris explores American landscape painting. Here, the museum's director, Henri Loyrette, looks at the oil paintings of Thomas Cole (1801-1848), known for his realistic and detailed works.
Francois Mori AP

The Louvre had a record 9 million visitors last year, and about 10 percent of them were American. Yet the iconic Paris art museum only has four American paintings in its huge permanent collection.

But the Louvre's curators want to change that and heighten the public's knowledge and awareness of early American art with a new exhibit.

Nationwide, French museums own some 2,000 American paintings, but those Whistlers, Homers and Cassatts are exhibited in more modern museums such as the Musee d'Orsay.

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4:05pm

Wed January 25, 2012
The Two-Way

Alaska Airlines To Stop Handing Out Prayer Cards

An Alaska Airlines jet. On that airline, prayer cards are no longer going to be part of the flying experience.
Gabriel Bouys AFP/Getty Images

"After more than 30 years of handing prayer cards to customers aboard its planes, Alaska Airlines has decided the practice is outdated and will stop doing it on Feb. 1," The Seattle Times reports.

A few things struck us about this news.

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3:59pm

Wed January 25, 2012
The Two-Way

Homeless Science Whiz Kid Is Not Named Science Prize Finalist

Samantha Garvey, 17.
John Dunn AP

Samantha Garvey, the homeless teen who came into the national spotlight after she became a semifinalist in the prestigious Intel Science Talent Search competition, has had a bittersweet 24 hours.

First the bitter part: When the science prize competition finalists were announced today, she was not on the list.

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3:00pm

Wed January 25, 2012
Politics

Giffords Makes A Tearful Farewell

Arizona Rep. Gabby Giffords took to the House floor Wednesday one last time to say good-bye, for now, to her colleagues. It was an emotional scene as she handed in her resignation, a little more than a year after being gravely injured in an assassination attempt.

3:00pm

Wed January 25, 2012
World

Egypt Marks Anniversary Of Revolution

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 7:03 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Cairo's Tahrir Square overflowed with Egyptians today. Traffic was snarled for miles as people jammed bridges and streets. The crowd marked the first anniversary of the popular uprising that drove Hosni Mubarak from power.

And as NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Cairo, many people did not come to celebrate.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

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3:00pm

Wed January 25, 2012
Movies

What's Hot At The Sundance Film Festival?

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 7:03 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The economic downturn is providing lots of fodder for filmmakers. That's become abundantly clear at this year's Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

Steven Zeitchik covers entertainment for the Los Angeles Times and he joins me from Park City.

And, Stephen, you're seeing this theme both in feature films and documentaries. Why don't we start with the documentaries. What have you seen?

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2:36pm

Wed January 25, 2012
It's All Politics

Ron Paul: Steadily, 'Our Numbers Are Growing'

U.S. Rep. Ron Paul, shown at a campaign stop in South Carolina, spoke with NPR's All Things Considered today about the upcoming primaries, the possibility of a third-party run, taxes and other issues.
John W. Adkisson Getty Images

In a wide-ranging discussion with All Things Considered's Robert Siegel, Ron Paul, the Republican congressman from Texas, said of all the GOP hopefuls, he's been the steady one.

"All I know is that the message is powerful," he said in response to a question about the viability of his campaign. "The message is well-received. Our numbers are growing, and we don't go up and down like a yo-yo."

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2:12pm

Wed January 25, 2012
The Two-Way

Keystone Pipeline's Connection To Payroll Taxes? It's Up For Debate

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 3:36 pm

The Keystone XL pipeline is supposed to connect Canada to Texas. But does it also have to connect to a payroll tax holiday?

White House Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett, speaking today on NPR's Tell Me More, said no link should be made because the oil pipeline is not "germane" to legislation involving a tax holiday.

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1:54pm

Wed January 25, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

L.A. Mayor Makes Condom Use The Law In Porn Films

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 2:15 pm

Condoms are about to get a bigger role in adult films shot in Los Angeles.
iStockphoto.com

In Los Angeles, the center of the U.S. adult film industry, condom use during the making of porn films will soon be required.

Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa signed the controversial ordinance into law this Monday.

Now it's up to the L.A. city clerk to post the new rule, which could happen this week, the Associated Press reports. After the posting, the rule would take effect in 41 days.

Filmmakers would have to agree to comply with the requirement to get a permit to make a movie.

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1:20pm

Wed January 25, 2012
The Two-Way

'Blue Marble 2012': NASA's 'Most Amazing' High Def Image Of Earth So Far

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 5:41 pm

Click here." href="/post/blue-marble-2012-nasas-most-amazing-high-def-image-earth-so-far" class="noexit lightbox">
"Blue Marble 2012." Want to see a really big version of this photo? Click here.
NASA

The "Blue Marble" image of Earth snapped by the crew of Apollo 17 in 1972 is one of the most famous photos ever taken. When it appeared, we all suddenly saw the world in a much different way.

In the years since, NASA has added other "Blue Marble" photos to its collection, and has used technology to enhance and sharpen the images.

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1:00pm

Wed January 25, 2012
NPR Story

GOP Candidates Gear Up Sunshine State Campaigns

Florida's GOP primary has become a battleground for the four remaining Republican hopefuls in the 2012 presidential race. The state's size and population are much larger than other primary states', and TV advertising is expected to play its largest role yet in the campaign.

1:00pm

Wed January 25, 2012
NPR Story

The Next Frontier For Florida's 'Space Coast'

NASA ended the U.S. shuttle program in 2011, leaving roughly 9,000 workers at the Kennedy Space Center without jobs. Many in Cape Canaveral hope the private space industry will blossom, and lead the way back into space, and back to work.

1:00pm

Wed January 25, 2012
NPR Story

Florida's Fight Against Prescription Drug Abuse

Seven people die every day in Florida from prescription drug overdoses, by one estimate. Many of those deaths have been linked to pill mills — medical facilities that illegally prescribe or dispense strong narcotics. Local authorities are taking steps to combat the crisis.

12:45pm

Wed January 25, 2012
The Two-Way

Fed: Economy Is 'Expanding Moderately,' But No Change In Rates

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 3:24 pm

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke during his news conference this afternoon.
Win McNamee Getty Images

The economy "has been expanding moderately, notwithstanding some slowing in global growth" in recent weeks, the Federal Reserve just reported.

In a statement timed for release at the end of their most recent meetings, Fed policymakers also said they expect economic growth in coming quarters "to be modest," that the jobless rate will "decline only gradually" and that inflation will run "at ... or below" levels the central bank wants to see.

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12:15pm

Wed January 25, 2012
It's All Politics

Will Backing Of Anti-Immigration Movement's 'Dark Lord' Haunt Romney?

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has endorsed Mitt Romney — an endorsement that some say could be toxic to the Republican presidential candidate.
John Milburn AP

Maybe you've never heard of Kris Kobach. To hear some immigration advocacy groups tell it, however, Kobach is going to cost Mitt Romney the Hispanic vote and — should Romney become the Republican nominee — the election.

Kobach is serving as the Kansas secretary of state. He remains better known in some quarters for his work as an adviser to legislators around the country drafting immigration laws — including the 2010 Arizona law that is being reviewed by the Supreme Court this spring.

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12:13pm

Wed January 25, 2012
Television

David Milch: Trying His 'Luck' With Horse Racing

Luck, the new HBO drama created by David Milch, is about the inside world of horse racing.
Gusmano Cesaretti HBO

Veteran TV writer and producer David Milch grew up in Buffalo, N.Y. But a few times each year, Milch would accompany his father across the state to Saratoga Springs, where the two would bet on horse races.

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12:04pm

Wed January 25, 2012
The Salt

USDA To Require Healthier Meals In Schools With Updated Nutrition Standards

Originally published on Mon January 30, 2012 5:46 pm

The new nutrition standards will replace school lunch dishes like pizza sticks with salad.
iStockphoto.com

Less salt and fat. More whole grains, fruit, veggies and low-fat dairy. This is what kids can expect in the school lunchroom soon, according to new nutrition standards for school meals announced today by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and first lady Michelle Obama.

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12:03pm

Wed January 25, 2012
The Two-Way

Europe Lacks Structures To Make Euro Work Properly, Merkel Says

Europe does not now have the "political structures" to make the euro work properly, German Chancellor Angela Merkel told world leaders today.

At the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, The Associated Press reports, "she said the weaknesses 'arose over years — so they can't be overcome at one fell swoop.' "

But, Merkel added, "we are determined to do this."

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12:00pm

Wed January 25, 2012
Politics

Republican, Democrat SOTU Seatmates React To Obama

On Tuesday, President Obama delivered his final State of the Union address of his four-year term. It largely focused on growing the nation's economy. Host Michel Martin talks with two members of Congress who sat next to each other during the address: Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., and Rep. Loretta Sanchez, D-Calif.

12:00pm

Wed January 25, 2012
Politics

Valerie Jarrett: Obama's SOTU A Call To Action

Host Michel Martin speaks with White House Senior Adviser Valerie Jarrett about President Obama's State of the Union speech. Jarrett discusses job loss and growth, and says America is moving in the right direction when it comes to combating unemployment.

12:00pm

Wed January 25, 2012
U.S.

Valerie Jarrett Explains Obama On Economy, Energy

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 12:01 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, NPR's senior business editor, Marilyn Geewax, will be with us once again. She'll be fact-checking the economic portions of the president's speech.

But we have more now with White House senior adviser Valerie Jarrett. She's one of the president's closest advisers. She's a key member of the team. She was with the president at the State of the Union address last night, and she's with us from the White House.

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12:00pm

Wed January 25, 2012
Economy

Fact-Checking The State Of The U.S. Economy

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The economy was such a focus of the president's speech last night that we thought it was appropriate to check in with NPR's senior business editor, Marilyn Geewax. Marilyn, thanks for coming in once again.

MARILYN GEEWAX, BYLINE: Hi.

MARTIN: Now, you just heard from Senior White House Advisor Valerie Jarrett. And the president said that, quote, "the state of the union is getting stronger," but I think you heard Ms. Jarrett say that a lot more is yet to do. So where are we, really?

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