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5:27pm

Sun January 22, 2012
Middle East

Should The West Intervene In Syria?

Originally published on Sun January 22, 2012 5:43 pm

An anti-Syrian regime protester holds up his fingers painted in revolutionary flag colors during a protest outside the Arab League headquarters in Cairo, Egypt Sunday.
Nasser Nasser AP

The Arab League sent observers to Syria about a month ago. Their mission: to bear witness to the escalating violence between soldiers loyal to President Bashar Assad and armed opposition fighters.

The presence of the orange-vested observers was supposed to discourage the violent crackdown on protesters, but since they arrived in December, almost 1,000 Syrians have died. Overall, it is estimated that more than 5,400 people have been killed since the protests began last March.

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4:58pm

Sun January 22, 2012
Sports

Legendary Football Coach Joe Paterno Mourned

Outside Penn State's football stadium, mourners paid respects to legendary football coach Joe Paterno who died Sunday from lung cancer.

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3:47pm

Sun January 22, 2012
Animals

Dog-Gone Genetics: A Few Genes Control Fido's Looks

The difference between these two dogs is not as great as you think. New research shows almost all physical traits in dogs are controlled by just a few genes.
istockphoto.com

Humans are complicated genetic jigsaw puzzles. Hundreds of genes are involved in determining something as basic as height.

But man's best friend is a different story. New research shows that almost every physical trait in dogs — from a dachshund's stumpy legs to a shar-pei's wrinkles — is controlled by just a few genes.

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3:28pm

Sun January 22, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney, Gingrich Appeals To GOP Right Raises General Election Hurdles

With Newt Gingrich beating Mitt Romney in South Carolina as soundly as the Johnny Rebels in 1861 thrashed the Billy Yanks at Bull Run (or the First Battle of Manassas, depending on your view), the Republican presidential nomination contest marches southward to Florida.

There in the Sunshine State, the campaign promises to be an even more hard- fought affair than in South Carolina, with both candidates battling for their party's conservative soul by out-righting each other.

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3:00pm

Sun January 22, 2012
Presidential Race

Gingrich's Win, Romney's Taxes And What They Mean

Originally published on Sun January 22, 2012 5:43 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Let's turn now to the other big story we're following today, and that is, of course, the fallout from last night's primary triumph for former House Speaker Newt Gingrich. As you know by now, he crushed his opponents, taking 40 percent of the vote, 12 points above his closest rival, the man hitherto known as the front-runner, Mitt Romney.

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2:59pm

Sun January 22, 2012
Television

'The Bark Side' Tells Of Super Bowl Ads To Come

The dogs starring in "The Bark Side" were shot individually, then pasted together, says Mark Hunter, Chief Creative Officer at Deutsch LA.
Deutsch LA

2:48pm

Sun January 22, 2012
Movie Interviews

Actor Ralph Fiennes On Taking Risks With "Coriolanus"

Caius In Charge: Ralph Fiennes directs co-star Vanessa Redgrave in his big-screen adaptation of Shakespeare's Coriolanus.
Larry D. Horricks The Weinstein Co.

For his directorial debut, actor Ralph Fiennes brings William Shakespeare's work to the big screen with a modern adaptation of Coriolanus. Fiennes also stars as the eponymous Roman general, a role he played on the stage 11 years ago.

The original play, Fiennes tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz, is complex.

"I had this feeling that if you were to clear away a lot of the denser passages, and shorten it and edit it, you are left actually with a very visceral, sinewy political thriller," Fiennes says.

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2:14pm

Sun January 22, 2012
The Two-Way

Gabrielle Giffords Steps Down: 'I Am Getting Better'

Rep. Gabrielle Giffords announced on Sunday that she will be stepping down from Congress.
YouTube

Rep. Gabrielle Giffords is stepping down from Congress in order to focus on her health. She made the announcement on a YouTube video posted to her Facebook page Sunday.

"I have more work to do on my recovery, so to do what is best for Arizona I will step down this week," she says.

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12:11pm

Sun January 22, 2012
Remembrances

Penn State Football Legend Joe Paterno Dies At 85

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:05 am

Penn State head coach Joe Paterno stands with his team before they take the field during an NCAA college football game against the University of Wisconsin in State College, Pa., on Oct. 13, 2007.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Joe Paterno, the man synonymous with Penn State football, died Sunday after developing complications from lung cancer. He was 85.

Paterno was an iconic figure on the sports landscape. He coached at Penn State for 61 years, though his long tenure ended amid a child sexual abuse scandal.

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11:45am

Sun January 22, 2012
It's All Politics

Gingrich Applauds Romney's Tax Decision; Santorum Declares Three-Man Race

The morning after a stinging defeat in South Carolina, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney said he would release his most recent tax returns this week, ahead of the Florida primary.

Romney said he would release his 2010 tax returns and an estimate of what he'll pay for 2011 on Tuesday. "We made a mistake in holding off as long as we did," he told Fox News Sunday.

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9:44am

Sun January 22, 2012
Election 2012

Mexican Cousins Keep Romney's Family Tree Rooted

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 9:24 am

Miles and Kent Romney, (left to right), distant cousins of former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, in Colonia Juarez, Mexico. Miles believes his cousin's candidacy is nothing less than prophetic.
Peter Breslow NPR

Hispanic voters are a key group in the presidential race, and Republican hopeful Mitt Romney has been reaching out to them. Should he tell them that he himself is the son of an immigrant from Mexico?

Romney's father, George, was born in the state of Chihuahua, in a colony of polygamous Mormons.

Romney rarely speaks about the Mexican branch of his family, and he's never visited his numerous cousins south of the border — but the Romneys of Mexico are all rooting for him.

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8:00am

Sun January 22, 2012
Europe

EU Reacts To Hungary's Media Crackdown

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 9:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now to Hungary, where the only independent radio news station in the country may soon go silent. Klubradio lost its license in what its owners charge was a government move to muzzle critics. NPR's Eric Westervelt reports from Budapest.

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO TALK SHOW)

GEORGE BOLGAR: (Foreign language spoken)

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8:00am

Sun January 22, 2012
Europe

Greek Village's Muslim Culture Clashes With Athens

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 9:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Reporter Joanna Kakissis traveled to the province of Thrace, in northern Greece, to look into a religious controversy. What she found, like so much in Greece these days, was a story about the sad state of the economy.

(SOUNDBITE OF PEOPLE TALKING)

JOANNA KAKISSIS, BYLINE: Recep Pacaman greets friends at his family home in the village of Komotini. The male visitor is wearing a prayer cap; the woman, a dark headscarf.

(SOUNDBITE OF PEOPLE TALKING)

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8:00am

Sun January 22, 2012
Presidential Race

Gingrich Wins Big In South Carolina

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 9:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

The Republican presidential nominating contest is now in full swing - emphasis on swing. Three states have voted, each anointing a different winner. Yesterday, South Carolinians had their say, and they picked Newt Gingrich. Mitt Romney was a distant second, with Rick Santorum and Ron Paul third and fourth.

We have reports from all four campaigns, starting with NPR's Tamara Keith at Gingrich headquarters last night.

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8:00am

Sun January 22, 2012
Presidential Race

Romney Finishes Second To Gingrich In S.C.

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 9:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It wasn't too long ago Mitt Romney looked like he was on a winning streak; that maybe if things kept going his way, he could sweep all the early primary and caucus states. Now, his record is one for three.

NPR's Ari Shapiro reports from Romney's South Carolina election-night headquarters on how things turn so dramatically, so quickly.

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8:00am

Sun January 22, 2012
Presidential Race

How Ron Paul And Rick Santorum Performed In SC

NPR's Don Gonyea reports on the also-rans in Saturday's South Carolina primary.

8:00am

Sun January 22, 2012
Middle East

Arab League Weighs Monitoring Mission In Syria

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 9:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We go now to Egypt, where a group of foreign ministers from the Arab League is meeting today. There are news reports that the group has decided to extend a month-long observer mission in Syria.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro has been tracking events there, and she joins us now from Cairo. Welcome to the program, Lulu.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, BYLINE: Thank you.

MARTIN: First off, can you give us a little more about the decision to extend? What do you know?

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8:00am

Sun January 22, 2012
Presidential Race

South Carolina Voters Reflect On Saturday's Primary

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 9:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. After a turbulent week of dropouts, reversals and impassioned pleas, in the end, it wasn't even close. Newt Gingrich beat Mitt Romney in the South Carolina GOP primary by 12 percentage points - a decisive win for the former speaker of the House, and a surprise for his rivals. The win scrambles the Republican race for the presidency. Voters have chosen three winners in the first three contests of the primary season.

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8:00am

Sun January 22, 2012
Technology

Technological Innovations Help Dictators See All

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 9:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

That brings us to our next story: the potential for governments - from dictatorships to democracies - to exploit technology to spy on their own citizens. John Villasenor is a fellow at the Brookings Institution, and he's written a paper on how governments may soon be able to record much of what is said or done within their borders - every phone conversation, electronic message, Facebook post, tweet and video from every street corner - and then store that information indefinitely.

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6:33am

Sun January 22, 2012
Latin America

Church Broadcasts Hope; Haitians Flock Post-Quake

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 9:24 am

Pastor Junior Antoine on stage at Shalom Tabernacle of Glory evangelical church, in front of a congregation that grew rapidly after the earthquake two years ago.
Jason Beaubien NPR

On Jan. 12, for the second anniversary of the devastating earthquake, thousands of people flocked to the Shalom Church in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The "church" is just a plywood stage under a patchwork of tattered tarps.

The crowd was so large that it spilled down a muddy hill toward a tent camp for earthquake victims. Most of the singing, swaying congregation were so far away they couldn't even see the podium.

The evangelical mission now claims to have more than 50,000 members and one of the most popular radio stations in Haiti.

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6:31am

Sun January 22, 2012
Africa

In Morocco, Islamists Learn To Work With A King

Morocco's Islamist Justice and Development Party heads the country's new government, the result of snap elections called by the king. Here, Abdelilah Benkirane, the party's secretary general and now prime minister, arrives for an election rally in Sale on Nov. 1. The party now faces political as well as economic challenges.
Paul Schemm AP

An Islamist party heads Morocco's newly elected government, part of a wave of Islamist election victories following uprisings across North Africa.

But Morocco's case is a bit different. King Mohammed VI responded quickly to a pro-democracy movement last year with a new constitution and snap elections. The Justice and Development Party, known as the PJD, won the most votes in November. Now, Moroccans ask: How will this popular Islamist party govern?

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6:29am

Sun January 22, 2012
National Security

CIA Tracks Public Information For The Private Eye

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 9:24 am

A student paints the Facebook logo on a mural commemorating Egypt's revolution last spring. The team from the CIA's Open Source Center monitors social media activity overseas.
Manoocher Deghati AP

Secrets: the currency of spies around the world.

The rise of social media, hash-tags, forums, blogs and online news sites has revealed a new kind of secret — those hiding in plain sight. The CIA calls all this information "open source" material, and it's changing the way America's top spy agency does business.

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12:49am

Sun January 22, 2012
It's All Politics

This Time, South Carolina GOP Bets Its Winning Streak On A Long Shot

Newt Gingrich along with his wife, Callista, addresses supporters at the Hilton Hotel in Columbia, S.C. following his primary victory. South Carolina voters have chosen the GOP nominee since 1980.
JEFF SINER MCT /Landov

By embracing Newt Gingrich in its primary, the South Carolina GOP has risked its remarkable record of success at picking the party's eventual nominee for president.

It's been quite a run. Beginning with its primary in 1980, when it chose Ronald Reagan, South Carolina has voted first among Southern states. And the Palmetto State's choice has gone on to dominate the other Southern states and lock up the nomination in short order. That happened eight times in a row, counting incumbent renominations.

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6:23pm

Sat January 21, 2012
It's All Politics

On Primary Day In South Carolina, Even Weddings Get Political

Originally published on Sat January 21, 2012 6:50 pm

A wedding party stops by GOP Presidential candidate Rick Santorum's headquarters in Charleston, South Carolina on the state's primary day, January 21.
Don Gonyea NPR

There are water fountains, park benches, churches and expensive restaurants and then there are presidential candidates' headquarters, now making the list of places to take wedding photos.

Especially if you're a part of this wedding party getting hitched on primary day in South Carolina.

NPR's Don Gonyea tweeted this photo of the bride and her bridesmaids while preparing to cover the results of Saturday's first-in-the-South vote.

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5:47pm

Sat January 21, 2012
Presidential Race

Gingrich Has Chance For 'Pretty Big Win' In S.C.

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:05 am

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich and his wife, Callista, celebrate after Gingrich was declared the winner of South Carolina's primary Saturday.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Newt Gingrich has beaten Mitt Romney in South Carolina. The question now becomes whether he can pull off that trick enough times in enough states to deny Romney the Republican presidential nomination.

It was a big win for Gingrich, the former House speaker, who took 40 percent of the vote, compared to 28 percent for Romney, a former Massachusetts governor.

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5:27pm

Sat January 21, 2012
It's All Politics

'Dirty' Politics As Usual In South?

  • 1988: The Willie Horton Ad
  • 2008: McCain's 'Bill Ayers' Anti-Obama Ad
  • Robo-Call: Newt's Baggage
  • Robo-Call: Santorum Supports Romney

South Carolinians are voting today in the GOP primary, which some pundits see as the candidates' last stand for getting the GOP nomination to run in the general election.

On weekends on All Things Considered today, host Guy Raz talked with Danielle Vinson, the chair of the political science department at Furman University in Greenville, S.C., about what is often considered "dirty" South Carolina primary politics.

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5:23pm

Sat January 21, 2012
Presidential Race

South Carolina Primary: Live Blog And Results

The third major contest of the 2012 Republican presidential campaign — South Carolina's primary — is being held today and we're live blogging as the news comes in. As we post, you'll get a message alerting you that there are new updates. Just click on that message and the news should flow right into the box below.

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4:00pm

Sat January 21, 2012
The Two-Way

South Carolina Primary: Join Us For Live Updates

A polling station in Columbia, S.C., earlier today (Jan. 21, 2012).
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

The third major contest of the 2012 Republican presidential campaign is being held today in South Carolina and as we did during the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary, we'll be helping out the NPR elections team by live blogging as the news comes in.

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3:00pm

Sat January 21, 2012
NPR Story

Week In News: The Salvo Against SOPA

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

JAY CARNEY: We need to do something about online piracy by foreign websites.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: Stop SOPA. Pass on PIPA.

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN BOEHNER: It's pretty clear to many of us that there's a lack of consensus at this point.

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3:00pm

Sat January 21, 2012
NPR Story

Risking The Danger Of Defection In North Korea

North and South Korea are still officially at war, even though a truce was declared more than 50 years ago. As a result, there are upwards of 22,000 North Korean defectors now living in South Korea. The journey across the heavily guarded border is treacherous and often deadly. It's been just over a month since Kim Jong Un rose to power after his father Kim Jong Il's sudden death and there are some reports of would-be defectors being shot down while trying to flee the impoverished nation.

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