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4:00am

Mon December 12, 2011
Europe

Russia Protest Update

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 8:59 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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4:00am

Mon December 12, 2011
Politics

Gingrich Lacks Extensive Iowa Ground Organization

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 8:59 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And as the president does that, the race for the Republican presidential nomination continues. Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney are the leaders in the race for that nomination. They faced each other in a debate in Des Moines, Iowa Saturday night.

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4:00am

Mon December 12, 2011
Around the Nation

Florida's Infamous Voting Machines Sold By Collector

On the tenth anniversary of the Supreme Court Bush v. Gore decision, Steve Inskeep reports that collectors have bought up those punch-card voting machines that caused the hanging chad confusion of the 2000 election. Jim Dobyns bought 4,500 machines in Palm Beach County and has sold nearly all of them.

4:00am

Mon December 12, 2011
Business

Occupy Protesters To Try To Shut Down Ports

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 8:59 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Occupy Wall Street and West Coast ports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Occupy protesters in cities up and down the West Coast are attempting to paralyze some of the nation's busiest ports today. Organizers say they expect thousands of demonstrators to turn out for what they're calling Wall Street on the Waterfront.

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4:00am

Mon December 12, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

3:02am

Mon December 12, 2011
It's All Politics

U.S. Troops Leaving Iraq This Year; Obama Could Benefit Next Year

Originally published on Tue December 13, 2011 10:25 am

On this April 7, 2009, visit to Iraq, President Obama greets U.S. troops at Camp Victory in Baghdad. On Dec. 2, 2011, the base was handed over to the Iraqi government. All U.S. soldiers are to be gone from Iraq by year's end.
Charles Dharapak Associated Press

The last American troops are coming home from Iraq this month, and President Obama is marking the occasion with a series of events to commemorate the conclusion of the war.

On Wednesday at Fort Bragg, N.C., he and the first lady will thank troops for their service.

This event is a decade in the making, with far-reaching implications including domestic political consequences.

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12:01am

Mon December 12, 2011
Asia

Despite Growth, China Too Faces Debt Problems

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 8:32 pm

Cui Jinmin oversees an abandoned strip of unfinished highway in western China's Shaanxi province. Cui says the government stopped paying his workers in April and they went home in July.
Frank Langfitt/NPR

As the U.S. and Europe have struggled with debt, China has seemed to be largely immune. This fall, the European Union even asked China for financial help, but China has a debt problem of its own.

Over the past several years, local governments have run up at least $1.5 trillion in bank loans for infrastructure projects intended to prop up the nation's economic growth. Analysts think much of that money will never be repaid.

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12:01am

Mon December 12, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Road Rage: A Symptom Of Much More Than Bad Traffic?

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 5:20 pm

Los Angeles is no stranger to traffic jams and road rage.
iStockphoto.com

It's not unusual for awful traffic conditions or incompetent driving to make some people really angry behind the wheel. But when enraged drivers actually lash out at others on the road, that's road rage — and experts say it can be a sign of deeper emotional problems.

The term road rage was coined in Los Angeles – a city long known for its epic freeway jams. Mike Shen got a taste of how bad it can get shortly after moving to L,A., when a woman viciously tailgated him on the freeway.

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12:01am

Mon December 12, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

French Lessons: Why Letting Kids Drink At Home Isn't Tres Bien

Many European parents, and some American ones, too, have long figured if they let their kids drink alcohol at home, they'd be less likely to go hog wild with their friends. But recent studies of teen drinking behavior don't bear that out.

That's unwelcome news in places like France, where these scientific developments are running head long into a culture that loves its wine.

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12:01am

Mon December 12, 2011
Business

Unpaid Bills Land Some Debtors Behind Bars

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan thinks more can be done to keep debtors out of jail. She says the state is investigating creditors that it thinks are abusing laws by incarcerating debtors.
Joshua Lott Getty Images

Although debtors' prisons are illegal across the country, it's becoming increasingly common for people to serve jail time as a result of their debt.

Collection agencies are resorting to some unusually harsh tactics to force people to pay their unpaid debt, some of whom aren't aware that lawsuits have been filed against them by creditors.

Take, for example, what happened to Robin Sanders in Illinois.

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12:01am

Mon December 12, 2011
Asia

Absent President Ignites Rumors In Pakistan

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 8:59 am

Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari speaks in Sri Lanka on Nov. 29. The president has been treated at a hospital in Dubai since Dec. 6. Aides say he is recovering.
Ishara S. Kodikara AFP/Getty Images

Pakistan is a country where rumors are always flowing. So when President Asif Ali Zardari was rushed to a hospital in the United Arab Emirates on Dec. 6, it set off all sorts of speculation.

His aides are doing their best to quell talk that he might step down. They say Zardari has been undergoing treatment and tests for a pre-existing heart ailment, and is recovering well in Dubai.

But that hasn't stopped politicians from considering what Pakistan's political landscape might look like without him.

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12:01am

Mon December 12, 2011
Still No Job: Over A Year Without Enough Work

The State Of The Long-Term Unemployed

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 12:02 pm

People wait to see a career adviser at a training center operated by the New York Department of Labor in New York City. NPR and the Kaiser Family Foundation conducted a survey on the emotional, physical and financial effects of being without work for a year or more. Nearly 70 percent of respondents would like the government to offer more job training opportunities.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Millions of Americans wake up each morning without a job, even though they desperately want to work. It's one of the depressing legacies of the financial crisis and Great Recession.

NPR and the Kaiser Family Foundation conducted a poll of people who had been unemployed or with an insufficient level of work for more than a year. The results document the financial, emotional and physical effects of long-term unemployment and underemployment.

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12:01am

Mon December 12, 2011
Still No Job: Over A Year Without Enough Work

The Impacts Of Long-Term Unemployment

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 2:55 pm

  • Hear Marilyn Geewax On 'Tell Me More'

The country has been trying to recover from the Great Recession for three years. But the U.S. job market remains weak, leaving roughly 5 million workers unemployed for a year or more.

The Kaiser Family Foundation teamed with NPR to conduct a survey, seeking to describe the experiences of those long-term unemployed workers. Here are some highlights of the survey findings.

The long-term unemployed tended to be low-wage workers.

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5:42pm

Sun December 11, 2011
Politics

Reforming Congress: Taking It Back To Formula

Fareed Zakaria is the host of CNN's international affairs program GPS, and editor at large for Time magazine and a columnist for The Washington Post.
W. W. Norton

One late January night in 1966, President Johnson went to the Capitol to deliver the annual State of the Union address.

Johnson was at the peak of his power that night, and during the hourlong speech, he talked about his agenda for the year: Vietnam, social programs and expanding the war on poverty. But right in the middle, he offered up an idea that seemed to come out of nowhere when he proposed to change the term for a congressman from two years to four, concurrent with presidential terms.

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5:36pm

Sun December 11, 2011
NPR Story

Baylor's Griffin Wins Heisman

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 10:57 am

Transcript

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: And now, the moment we've been waiting for. It is my pleasure to announce that the 2011 winner of the Heisman Trophy is Robert Griffin III, RG3.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

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5:36pm

Sun December 11, 2011
NPR Story

Remembering Jerry Robinson, Creator Of The Joker

Originally published on Mon December 12, 2011 10:57 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: I do believe it's that arch-criminal the Joker.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Flags are flying at half-staff in Gotham City right now. Jerry Robinson, widely considered to be the creator of Batman's iconic enemy the Joker died this past week.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "BATMAN BEYOND")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: (as the Joker) That's not funny.

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3:00pm

Sun December 11, 2011
Environment

In Pa., Drilling Comes Into Focus

The vast, untapped natural gas reserves in Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale are the subject of much debate. Scientists who are trying to shed light on the safety of drilling are facing a host of obstacles, including lack of funding and data. Susan Phillips Scientists who are trying to shed light on the safety of drilling are facing a host of obstacles.

2:57pm

Sun December 11, 2011
Author Interviews

Shimon Peres' Book Honors Israel's Founding Father

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 12:07 pm

Shimon Peres, the Nobel Peace laureate and President of Israel, was just 23 years old when he became a trusted aid to his country's founding prime minister, David Ben-Gurion.

He's not sure why Ben-Gurion put so much faith in someone so young. "Maybe he was wrong, maybe it was a mistake," Peres tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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1:40pm

Sun December 11, 2011
Deceptive Cadence

Clouds, Concertos And A Trip To Fiji: New Classical Albums

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 3:07 pm

Cloud and Light, by Tshio Hosokawa, was written for the ancient Japanes instrument called the sho.
ECM

With all the chatter about the death of the compact disc, anxiety in the recording industry and the domination of downloads, the flood of CDs overflowing my mailbox never seems to recede. Need a new Bruckner 4th, an Adès anthology or piano music by Pärt? How about Azerbaijani concertos, Schubert sonatas or a new Midsummer Night's Dream?

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12:20pm

Sun December 11, 2011
Presidential Race

Former Spokesman: 'Newt, If I Let You Down, I'm Sorry'

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich speaks while former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and U.S. Rep. Ron Paul look on during the ABC News GOP presidential debate on Saturday in Des Moines, Iowa.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Judging by the attacks on Newt Gingrich at Saturday's GOP debate in Des Moines, Iowa, the former House speaker is the man to beat in the Republican presidential field.

The past few weeks have seen a remarkable turnaround for Gingrich's campaign. It wasn't long ago when his bid was all but left for dead. This summer, nearly his entire campaign staff resigned on a single day. One of those staffers was Gingrich's longtime communications aide Rick Tyler.

Tyler explains that he left because he lost perspective, but is now open to rejoining Gingrich's campaign.

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8:00am

Sun December 11, 2011
NPR Story

Iraq PM, Obama Get Together To Break Apart

Originally published on Sun December 11, 2011 9:58 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

Nearly nine years after the Iraq War began, the U.S. is winding down its involvement there. U.S. troops will be out of Iraq by December 31st. The Obama administration says what comes next will be a new phase in the relationship with Iraq. What that involves will most likely be part of the discussion when Iraq's prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, heads to Washington to meet with President Obama tomorrow.

NPR's Kelly McEvers reports from Baghdad.

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8:00am

Sun December 11, 2011
NPR Story

Congress May Be Tied To The Hill For Holidays

Originally published on Sun December 11, 2011 9:58 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Whoever winds up winning the Republican nomination will get a chance to be president, and one of the most trying parts of that job is dealing with Congress. Joining us now is NPR congressional correspondent David Welna to walk us through the issues still on the table as Congress approaches its Christmas recess. Hi there, David.

DAVID WELNA, BYLINE: Hi, Audie.

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8:00am

Sun December 11, 2011
World

At Last, Nations Agree To Landmark Climate Deal

Tired delegates work into the early hours of Sunday morning on the final day of the climate talks in Durban, South Africa.
Rajesh Jantilal AFP/Getty Images

After a third sleepless night, climate negotiators in Durban South Africa finally found a way to reach a compromise early Sunday morning. The deal doesn't set hoped-for new targets to limit global warming, but delegates ultimately decided to embrace it rather than risk a major collapse of this international process.

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8:00am

Sun December 11, 2011
Europe

German Influence Looms Over Eurozone Deal

Originally published on Sun December 11, 2011 9:58 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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8:00am

Sun December 11, 2011
NPR Story

Waves Of Russians Fill The Streets To Protest Putin

Originally published on Sun December 11, 2011 9:58 am

Tens of thousands of Russians took to the streets of Moscow Saturday, shouting "We exist!" against Vladimir Putin's inevitable return to the presidency. Host Audie Cornish speaks with Julia Ioffe, Foreign Policy's Moscow correspondent, about post-election protests in Russia.

8:00am

Sun December 11, 2011
World

Canada Escapes Recession's Grip

Originally published on Sun December 11, 2011 9:58 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

As Europe works to solve its financial problems, closer to home - and with a little less fanfare - America's biggest trading partner is thriving. Canada has built an impressive track record throughout the recession. It's got low unemployment, little government debt, and some of the healthiest economic growth in the industrialized world. Brian Mann traveled to Toronto for WBEZ's Chicago's Front and Center project, and has this story.

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8:00am

Sun December 11, 2011
NPR Story

Youngest South-Pole Skier In Family Of Firsts

Originally published on Sun December 11, 2011 9:58 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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8:00am

Sun December 11, 2011
NPR Story

What's Major League Soccer Without Beckham?

Originally published on Sun December 11, 2011 9:58 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

David Beckham - when you hear that name, you probably think of one of today's greatest soccer players.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Can he bend it? Beckham. It's in the net. Beckham is going to slide over the half-point line and he is going to (unintelligible) the net. What a goal for David Beckham.

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8:00am

Sun December 11, 2011
Around the Nation

In N.Y.C., Front-Row Seats To Spanish Soccer

Barcelona and Real Madrid are two of the best soccer teams in the world. They're also bitter rivals, and when they met Saturday in the showcase El Clasico match-up, fans around the world turned out to watch the game. Reporter Jesse Hardman joined soccer enthusiasts at New York's Spanish Benevolent Society.

8:00am

Sun December 11, 2011
NPR Story

Big Cash Prize For Untangling Shredded Paper

California software developer Octavio Good and his team won $50,000 for reassembling shredded documents. Host Audie Cornish talks to Good about the Pentagon-sponsored contest.

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