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6:00am

Sat November 26, 2011
Space

New Roving Science Lab Charts A Course For Mars

Originally published on Sun November 27, 2011 5:40 am

The compact car-sized Mars Science Laboratory is due to land on the red planet on Aug. 6, 2012. It is equipped with a suite of instruments to study rocks and soils, and take other measurements.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

It's time to go back to Mars. Once every two years, the orbits of Earth and Mars are aligned just right, so it's possible to send a spacecraft from here to there. That special time is now.

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6:00am

Sat November 26, 2011
The Salt

With Paula Deen, It's Not Really About The Pie

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 10:18 am

For fans of TV chef Paula Deen (seen here in a photo from 2006), her appeal lies not in the recipes, but in that feeling that she's talking just to you.
Courtesy of Food Network AP

When I heard Paula Deen was coming to town, the image that leaped to mind was a fried cheesecake, deep-fried. She actually makes this!

At a time when it's trendy to take things out of food (think: gluten-free, sodium-free, fat-free), Paula Deen unapologetically puts it all back in. She loves all that stuff we're told to eat less of: butter, mayonnaise, sour cream. Did I say butter?

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6:00am

Sat November 26, 2011
Election 2012

In Iowa, Obama Backers Seek To Rekindle Enthusiasm

President Obama's campaign is gearing up in the early states ahead of the 2012 election. In Iowa, Obama supporters are hoping to recapture at least some of the enthusiasm that catapulted a young senator from Illinois to victory in the state's leadoff caucuses four years ago.

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6:00am

Sat November 26, 2011
Around the Nation

At LAPD, Predicting Crimes Before They Happen

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 5:17 pm

A resident talks with a Los Angeles police officer after another officer was wounded during a shooting in the city in August. Under a program the LAPD is rolling out this month, computer statistics will be used to predict where a crime will occur. Officials hope that the technique will help reduce crime.
Nick Ut AP

Capt. Sean Malinowski of the Los Angeles Police Department does his crime-fighting in front of a computer screen.

He's in the LAPD's Real Time Analysis and Critical Response Division, located in a new crime data and analysis center in downtown Los Angeles. Malinowski is tracking two crimes that just occurred in south Los Angeles. Patrol cars are already on the scene. He says this facility is state of the art in real-time policing. He wants the force to be the best in predicting where criminals will strike.

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3:51am

Sat November 26, 2011
Sports

NBA Owners, Players Reach Tentative Deal

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 6:23 am

NBA Commissioner David Stern (right) and union executive director Billy Hunter speak to the media Saturday in New York City to announce a tentative labor agreement that would end the 149-day lockout.
Patrick McDermott Getty Images

After nearly two years of bickering, NBA players and owners are back on the same side.

"We want to play basketball," Commissioner David Stern said.

Come Christmas Day, they should be.

The sides reached a tentative agreement early Saturday to end the 149-day lockout and hope to begin the delayed season with a marquee triple-header Dec. 25. Most of a season that seemed in jeopardy of being lost entirely will be salvaged if both sides approve the handshake deal.

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6:13pm

Fri November 25, 2011
The Two-Way

Black Friday Frenzy Sparks Violence At Some Stores

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 6:20 am

Shoppers wait to get inside of a Best Buy store on Nov. 25 in Naples, Fla.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Shoppers flooded stores across the country today as the holiday shopping season officially got under way and people rushed to grab Black Friday deals on electronics, toys and other merchandise.

More than 9,000 people waited outside Macy's Herald Square in New York City on Thursday night ahead of the midnight opening, according to The Associated Press. A Best Buy in St. Petersburg, Fla., had a line nearly 2,000 shoppers deep.

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5:30pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Music

For Pesky Relatives, A CD-Buying Gift Guide

Shabazz Palaces.
David Belisle and Leif Podhajsky

When Rachel Martin was given a slot guest-hosting weekends at All Things Considered, she took the opportunity to get a little holiday shopping out of the way. Needing musical stocking-stuffers for a few pesky relatives — her fiance's mom, for example, or her dad, who likes "Tchaikovsky and Johnny Cash" — she consulted NPR Music's Stephen Thompson, and asked him for some tips.

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4:21pm

Fri November 25, 2011
NPR Story

Awaiting Political Change In Egypt

Guy Raz speaks with Samer Shehata, professor of Arab politics at Georgetown University, for an update on why Egypt is experiencing more protests and on elections planned for next week.

4:21pm

Fri November 25, 2011
NPR Story

Court Ruling Could Alter Marine Parks Permanently

Last year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited SeaWorld following the death of a killer whale trainer. If a Florida court rules in favor of OSHA, employees of SeaWorld and other parks like it will no longer be able to come into direct contact with whales unless there is a barrier between them. Guy Raz speaks to Tim Zimmermann, a correspondent for Outside Magazine, about the ongoing legal dispute.

4:21pm

Fri November 25, 2011
NPR Story

Letters: A Thanksgiving Tale

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 4:55 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz. And now it's time for your letters - all about our annual Thanksgiving Day story by writer Bailey White. This year, Bailey told us about a Florida painter who moved to Vermont, where he has trouble fitting in. At a neighbor's suggestion, he turns to raising turkeys.

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4:21pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Middle East

Political Protests In Egypt Intensify, Expand

Egypt's military rulers named a former prime minister under Hosni Mubarak to head the new government. The move is likely to further incite the tens of thousands of protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square, demanding the resignation of the ruling military council. And for the first time, pro-military protesters gathered in another of Cairo's squares.

4:16pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Middle East

Palestinian Unity Would Pose New Headaches

Rival Palestinian leaders met in Cairo this week to discuss prospects for a reconciled government. For more than four years, the Palestinian Authority has governed the West Bank, while the militant Islamist group, Hamas, has ruled the Gaza Strip. But any government that included Hamas would face serious obstacles.

4:09pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Politics

Even Lawmakers Ask: Does Anyone Like Congress?

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 4:55 pm

A dark cloud passes over the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. Many lawmakers fear that Congress' already low approval rating will sink even further after the failure of the supercommittee.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

3:42pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Around the Nation

Black Friday Madness Sweeps Across The Country

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 7:08 am

Customers shop for electronics items during Black Friday at a Best Buy in San Diego.
Sandy Huffaker Getty Images

By the time it opened at 9 p.m. Thursday night for Black Friday, the Toys R Us in New York City's Times Square had a line snaking around the corner from its entrance on 44th Street. It went on for two blocks.

Angela Jenkins was there with two of her girlfriends and no kids. "I left my boyfriend with all of our kids ... by himself," she says with a laugh.

"You gotta do what you gotta do," Jenkins says.

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3:36pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Music News

New Liturgy Reanimates Catholic Music

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 5:17 pm

Members of the St. Agnes Catholic Church choir sing during Sunday Mass. From left to right: Donald Hukle, Ray Valido, Richard Samp, Jack Grace and Ben Robles.
Peter Maher Courtesy of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians

When Catholics arrive at church for the beginning of Advent this weekend, they may find themselves stumbling over not only the words, but also the music. The Vatican has changed the English-speaking Mass to make it more faithful to the Latin — and as a result, the sung portions of the Mass often don't work.

It's the most dramatic change in more than 40 years, and it has Mike McMahon working overtime with his choir.

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3:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Around the Nation

'Flash Robs' Worry Retailers

A new kind of shoplifting has hit stores in Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia. "Flash robs" occur when a group of people organized over social media steal by mobbing a store. Police are advising store employees not to try and stop the robbers, and to take steps to make the quick removal of items difficult.

3:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Research News

Why We Give, Not Why You Think

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 5:16 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

This time of year, pleas for donations are as plentiful as eggnog and door-buster sales. Americans give around $300 billion a year to charity. And as NPR's Alix Spiegel reports, psychologists have started to look more closely at when and why we're motivated to give.

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3:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Europe

Germany's Identity Cemented In The Euro

When the euro was rolled out nearly a decade ago, it was touted as a unifying force across European cultures. Uwe Boek, a 48-year-old Berliner, has seen and embraced these changes: "It's us being Europeans in the European Union. Because the euro is money but the European Union is about identity."

3:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Europe

For Greeks, A Sad Shift In Self Image

There was a time when Greeks were proud of being Greek, of being a people known for dancing, being happy without material wealth, enjoying life. Now, Greeks are known for being deeply in debt, accused by some of living the high life on other people's money, of dragging Europe's economy to the brink of disaster.

1:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Science

IgNobel Prizes Salute The Silly In Science

This year's 21st First Annual IgNobel Prize Ceremony featured the science of sighs, inquiries into the yawning habits of the red-footed tortoise, and songs about the chemistry of coffee. Ira Flatow and Ig master of ceremonies Marc Abrahams present some of the highlights from this year's festivities.

1:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
NPR Story

Building 'The Big Roads'

In his new book The Big Roads: The Untold Story of the Engineers, Visionaries, and Trailblazers Who Created the American Superhighways writer Earl Swift looks at the history and people behind the world's largest public works project — the U.S. interstate superhighway system.

1:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
NPR Story

Giant Pumpkin, But Forget About Pie

Some pumpkins just aren't meant for the pie pan. Robert Sabin has been growing "Atlantic giant" pumpkins for ten years and says they are more like children than fruit to him. He raises his pumpkins for competition--the heavier, the better.

1:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Science

Science Diction: The Origin Of 'Stethoscope'

The first stethoscope, invented by the French physician René Laennec, was simply a hollow wooden or ebony tube. Laennec named the device using the Greek roots stethos, or chest, and skopein, to look at or to observe. Medical historian Howard Markel discusses how Laennec came up with the invention. Unlike the stethoscope familiar to patients today, the original device was a simple tube.

1:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Health

A Tale Of Two Addicts: Freud, Halsted And Cocaine

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 6:20 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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12:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Around the Nation

Treatment, Not Jail, For Low Level Drug Crimes

A pilot program in Seattle, Wash., and surrounding King County allows some low-level drug offenders to go to rehabilitation programs instead of prison. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with King County's sheriff, a public defender and a member of the Seattle police department about the bi-partisan plan.

12:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
History

Collecting Oral Histories Of Jim Crow

Decades ago, Duke University students and professors did more than 1,000 interviews with African-Americans who lived through the Jim Crow era. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with two professors involved with the project. (Advisory: This segment contains language that may not be suitable for all audiences.)

12:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
StoryCorps' National Day Of Listening

English Prof. Helps Rewrite Student's Self Image

Friday is National Day of Listening, and this year, Story Corps is focusing on the impact teachers have made. Regular Tell Me More contributor Lester Spence speaks with his University of Michigan professor, Ralph Story, whose guidance helped him believe in his potential.

12:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Media

Racist History Of American News Media?

The new book News for All the People traces how mainstream publishers and broadcasters perpetuated racism through their coverage, but also how journalists of color fought to develop a more democratic, alternative press. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with the authors about their work and where the internet stands in diversifying news.

12:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Music

Reviving The 'Motown Of Cleveland'

The Boddie Record Company, founded by Louise Boddie and her husband was one of the first African-American owned record companies in Cleveland, Ohio. It had been relatively obscure until record collector Dante Carfagna and the Numero Group assembled a box set of the Boddie recordings. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with Carfagna and Louise Boddie.

11:37am

Fri November 25, 2011
News

Have The Crackdowns On Immigration Gone Too Far?

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 4:29 pm

Protesters march outside the Alabama Capitol during a demonstration against the state's immigration law in Montgomery, Ala., on Nov. 15.
Dave Martin AP

The architect of Arizona's controversial immigration law has been voted out of office. That law and similar statutes are undergoing difficult court challenges. And the strictest law, in Alabama, has ignited a withering backlash expected to force major changes.

Have the crackdowns on illegal immigration finally gone too far?

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