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4:27pm

Mon October 27, 2014
Shots - Health News

New York's Disease Detectives Hit The Street In Search Of Ebola

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 6:25 pm

A woman on the L train in New York City last week covers her face, fearful because a doctor with Ebola rode the train days earlier. Epidemiologists say people on the subway were not at risk.
Stephen Nessen WNYC

A little-seen force has fanned out across New York City intent on stopping the spread of Ebola virus – disease detectives go looking for contacts who might be infected.

"They're just really good at finding people," says Denis Nash. He worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the New York City Health Department, tracing the spread of HIV and West Nile virus. He says these trained applied epidemiologists are experts at finding almost anybody, with only a vague description.

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3:46pm

Mon October 27, 2014
The Two-Way

Reports: Boko Haram May Have Kidnapped Dozens More Girls In Nigeria

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 4:47 pm

A man poses with a sign in front of police officers in riot gear during a demonstration calling on the government to rescue the kidnapped girls of a government secondary school in Chibok, in Abuja, Nigeria, on Tuesday.
Olamikan Gbemiga AP

According to reports this morning, armed militants with the extremist group Boko Haram have continued to abduct young girls in Nigeria.

Remember, earlier this month there was hope that the abductions would stop when the government announced a truce with the group. The deal was supposed to culminate in the release of the 276 school girls the group kidnapped in April.

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3:39pm

Mon October 27, 2014
The Salt

Sandwich (Replacement) Monday: Soylent

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 4:24 pm

Step 1: Start getting disappointed.
NPR

My sister Natalie recently had a birthday, and a friend who hates her sent her a packet of Soylent, the powdered meal of the future containing all the boring nutrients we need to live.

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3:22pm

Mon October 27, 2014
Goats and Soda

A Congolese Mother Of Six Is Honored For Her Death-Defying Journalism

Congolese editor Solange Lusiku Nsimire says journalism is a powerful way of building and preserving her troubled country's "collective memory."
Sylvain Muyali Courtesy of IWMF

"Journalism is my calling, the print media is my struggle and independence is my motto," says 42-year-old Solange Lusiku Nsimire, a Congolese editor and mother of six.

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2:28pm

Mon October 27, 2014
The Two-Way

CVS Pulls Apple Pay, And Many See A Fight Over Mobile Wallets

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 3:25 pm

One week after Apple's new mobile payment system, Apple Pay, debuted in CVS stores, CVS has backtracked and barred its use. Rite Aid took the same step, leading many observers to note that the two companies are part of a group of retailers that's developing its own payment system, called CurrentC. Partners include Wal-Mart, Best Buy and 7-Eleven.

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1:27pm

Mon October 27, 2014
The Salt

Gladiator Gatorade? Ancient Athletes Had A Recovery Drink, Too

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 12:03 pm

This gladiator tombstone was excavated in a cemetery for these ancient power athletes in what was once Ephesus, in modern-day Turkey.
Courtesy of PLOS ONE

So it's A.D. 150, and you've just had a long day at the gym (or ludus), thrusting and parrying with your fellow Roman gladiators. What do you reach for to replenish your sapped strength? A post-workout recovery drink, of course.

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12:58pm

Mon October 27, 2014
Shots - Health News

Disabled Vermont Woman Who Led Class-Action Suit Sues Medicare Again

iStockphoto

A 78-year-old Vermont mother of four who helped change Medicare coverage for millions of other seniors is still fighting to persuade the government to pay for her own care.

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12:35pm

Mon October 27, 2014
The Two-Way

U.N. Ambassador Goes To Sierra Leone For Closer Look At Ebola Crisis

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 12:23 pm

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power has her temperature taken as she arrives in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on Monday. Power is on a visit to West Africa to get a first-hand look at the global response to the epidemic.
Reuters/Landov

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

The U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations has arrived in Sierra Leone on her multi-nation swing through Ebola-stricken West Africa

Samantha Power, who arrived in the capital Freetown after visiting neighboring Guinea, has said Washington wants to help the region fight the deadly virus.

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11:29am

Mon October 27, 2014
The Two-Way

Chiquita Fruit Company Is Bought By Two Brazilian Firms

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 2:47 pm

Chiquita, whose bananas are found in markets around the U.S., has agreed to sell itself to a coalition of two Brazilian companies.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Chiquita Brands International, the banana and produce firm whose trademark blue stickers have been ubiquitous in American kitchens for decades, is being sold to two Brazilian companies in a deal valued at around $1.3 billion. The Charlotte-based company traces its roots to the 1870s, when American entrepreneurs brought bananas to U.S. consumers from the Caribbean.

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10:51am

Mon October 27, 2014
The Two-Way

Ronnie Milsap Joins Country Music's Hall Of Fame

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 8:39 pm

Singer and songwriter Ronnie Milsap is a new inductee into the Country Music Hall Of Fame in Nashville, Tenn.
Rick Diamond Getty Images

A new class of musicians was inducted to the Country Music Hall of Fame Sunday night, with blind singer and pianist Ronnie Milsap leading the group. Milsap's career ranged from playing both early R&B and on the Elvis hit "Kentucky Rain" in the 1960s to the heights of solo success in the '70s and '80s. One of his biggest hits was 1980's "Smoky Mountain Rain."

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10:48am

Mon October 27, 2014
The Two-Way

Death Penalty Reportedly Sought For Captain In Korean Ferry Disaster

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 3:21 pm

The captain of the sunken ferry Sewol, Lee Joon-Seok (left) arrives on the second day of his trial at the Gwangju District Court in Gwanju, southwestern South Korea, in June.
Kim Hee-chul EPA/Landov

Prosecutors in South Korea are reportedly demanding the death penalty for the captain of a ferry that capsized and sank in April, killing more than 300 people. Lee Joon-seok is accused of homicide for leaving passengers, including many teenagers on a school outing, to fend for themselves.

Prosecutors say Lee failed to perform his duty as captain of the Sewol, according to Yonhap news agency.

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9:58am

Mon October 27, 2014
The Two-Way

N.J. Says Quarantined Nurse Will Be Discharged, Allowed To Leave

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 2:33 pm

Kaci Hickox, the nurse who spent the weekend in mandatory quarantine after arriving in New Jersey from West Africa, will be discharged from the hospital and allowed to leave the state, officials said today, citing tests that have shown she's been free of any Ebola symptoms for the past 24 hours.

The move could allow Hickox, a Texas native, to travel to Maine, where she currently lives.

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9:55am

Mon October 27, 2014
Goats and Soda

The Red Cross Is Using Text Messaging To Take Down Ebola

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 12:44 pm

After the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the Red Cross sent text messages across the country with health tips, locations of aid and safety reminders. A similar system is being used in Sierra Leone to combat Ebola.
International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

"If someone you know is sick with sudden fever, diarrhea or vomiting, you should call 117 for advice."

"Healthcare workers who take care of Ebola patients have to wear protective clothes do not be afraid of them."

"People with Ebola who go to the health centre early have a better chance of survival."

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8:57am

Mon October 27, 2014
The Two-Way

'Welcome Back, Kotter' Actress Marcia Strassman Dies At 66

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 2:54 pm

This photo provided by Julie Strassman shows her sister, actress Marcia Strassman. The actress, who played Gabe Kaplan's wife, Julie, on the 1970's sitcom Welcome Back, Kotter, has died at age 66.
Randi St. Nicholas AP

Actress Marcia Strassman, best known for her role in the 1970s TV sitcom Welcome Back, Kotter, has died at age 66, her sister says.

She died Friday at her home in the Sherman Oaks neighborhood of Los Angeles after a years-long struggle with breast cancer.

The Hollywood Reporter says:

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7:53am

Mon October 27, 2014
The Two-Way

Town In Hawaii Prepares For Possible Evacuation Ahead Of Lava Flow

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 12:05 pm

A lava flow advances across the pasture between the Pahoa cemetery and Apaa Street, engulfing a barbed wire fence, near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii on Sunday.
U.S. Geological Survey AP

Updated at 12:05 p.m. ET

Creeping lava from Mount Kilauea on Hawaii's Big Island is burning a path ever-closer to an area where residents have been warned that they might have to quickly leave their homes.

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7:01am

Mon October 27, 2014
The Two-Way

Pro-Western Parties Sweep Ukraine's Parliamentary Elections

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 11:34 am

People cast their ballots at a polling station during Ukrainian parliamentary elections in Kiev on Sunday.
Ivan Vakolenko UPI/Landov

Elections in Ukraine are pointing to a new parliament that will be dominated by pro-Western parties, a result that President Petro Poroshenko is hailing as a "course toward Europe" but one that is likely to further anger Russia.

NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from Kiev that exit polls show the bloc supporting Porsohenko is projected to win about 23 percent of the vote, followed closely by an allied party, the People's Front, with around 21 percent.

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6:30am

Mon October 27, 2014
World

Ukrainian Parliament Candidate 'Darth Vader' Blocked From Voting

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 7:32 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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6:23am

Mon October 27, 2014
The Two-Way

Attacker Made Video Of Himself Before Shooting, Canadian Police Say

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 2:40 pm

The man named as the shooter in the attack near the Canadian Parliament made a video of himself before the Oct. 22 incident, Royal Canadian Mounted Police say.

A statement from Police Commissioner Bob Paulson on Sunday said the ongoing investigation "has revealed a great deal about [Michael] Zehaf-Bibeau's movements and actions" prior to the shooting.

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5:08am

Mon October 27, 2014
World

On Anniversary Of N.Y. Subway, A Look At Who's Taking New Steps

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 7:32 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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4:36am

Mon October 27, 2014
Research News

Fear Of Blowing Big Calls May Affect How Umpires Do Their Jobs

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 7:32 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:36am

Mon October 27, 2014
Politics

After Sunday Service, Georgia Churches Get Souls To The Polls

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 2:06 pm

Martha Frazier rides a bus to vote in Miami in 2012. This year, Georgia churches are running similar "Souls to the Polls" programs, busing worshipers to early voting locations after Sunday service.
J Pat Carter AP

At The Greater Piney Grove Baptist Church in Atlanta, about 700 congregants jam the pews every Sunday morning at 10:30. The church is near the edge of DeKalb County, and it's helping lead a "Souls to the Polls" drive.

Georgia Democrat Michelle Nunn is running an extremely tight race for Senate against Republican David Perdue, and the difference between victory and defeat could ride on the African-American vote. The push is on to get voters to turn out early — especially at black churches.

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4:36am

Mon October 27, 2014
World

Closed McDonald's In Moscow Taken As A Political Message

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 7:32 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:36am

Mon October 27, 2014
Shots - Health News

In The Hospital, A Bad Translation Can Destroy A Life

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 8:58 am

Dr. Angela Alday talks with Isidro Hernandes, via a Spanish-speaking interpreter, Armando Jimenez. Both patient and doctor say they much prefer an in-person interpreter to one on the phone.
Jeff Schilling Courtesy of Tuality Healthcare

Translating from one language to another is a tricky business, and when it comes to interpreting between a doctor and patient, the stakes are even higher.

Consider the story of 18-year-old baseball player Willie Ramirez.

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4:36am

Mon October 27, 2014
Shots - Health News

Corneal Implants Might Make Reading Glasses Obsolete

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 9:03 am

A corneal inlay next to a contact lens.
Courtesy of John Vukich

For Lori Bandt, who works as a medical technician and an EMT in a suburb of Madison, Wis., the print on vials of medication has become so difficult to read that if she forgets her reading glasses she has to resort to having a younger EMT worker read the directions. The 45-year-old says: "I'm just stuck."

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4:36am

Mon October 27, 2014
Parallels

In Crimea, Many Signs Of Russia, Few Of Resistance

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 9:08 am

Russia established the Crimean port of Sevastopol in the 18th century. After the Soviet breakup in 1991, Russia and Ukraine shared the naval base. But Russia has now taken the entire base, including Ukrainian ships.
Max Avdeev for NPR

Morning Edition host David Greene and producer Lauren Migaki traveled to Crimea to see what's changed since Russia sent troops in this spring and shortly afterward annexed the territory despite widespread international criticism. Their stories will be on air and online this week.

We're traveling through flat farmland on a two-lane road in the far north of Crimea, when suddenly it's interrupted by a checkpoint. Actually, Russia now considers it the border, a physical reminder of the new divide between Russia and Ukraine — and the West.

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2:08am

Mon October 27, 2014
The Two-Way

Student Who Was Hospitalized After School Shooting In Washington Dies

A visitor leaves flowers on Saturday, the day after a shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in Marysville, Wash.
Jason Redmond Reuters/Landov

A student has died after being injured in Friday's shooting at a high school in Marysville, Wash. She died at Providence Regional Medical Center Everett, health officials said at a news conference Sunday night.

Dr. Joanne Roberts read a statement from the teenager's family, which said in part, "We are devastated by this senseless tragedy."

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7:04pm

Sun October 26, 2014
Music

Did Led Zeppelin Plagiarize 'Stairway'? A Pa. Judge Will Decide

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 10:29 am

This week, a judge in Pennsylvania moved forward with a lawsuit against the members of Led Zeppelin and their music publishers. The band is accused of plagiarism.
Dario Cantatore AP

Everyone who knows rock 'n' roll knows the opening riff to Led Zeppelin's 1971 hit "Stairway to Heaven." Play it side-by-side with the 1968 song "Taurus" by the band Spirit, and they sound almost the same.

The songs were released more than four decades ago, but just this week, a judge in Pennsylvania allowed a lawsuit about the issue to move forward.

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6:23pm

Sun October 26, 2014
Research News

From Brain To Computer: Helping 'Locked-In' Patient Get His Thoughts Out

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 10:08 am

Patients with certain kinds of brain damage can wind up with locked-in syndrome: they may be able to think just fine, but are unable to communicate their thoughts to others. A recently published case study shows that a non-invasive brain-computer interface can help.
iStockphoto

In 2009, a man named Barry Beck suffered a series of strokes, which caused extensive damage to his right occipital lobe and to the brain stem. The geologist and author of several books was left completely unable to communicate, in a state known as locked-in syndrome.

The condition was famously described by Jean-Dominique Bauby in his memoir The Diving Bell And The Butterfly, which he dictated by blinking.

But thanks to a team of researchers and some technological advances, Beck had another option.

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6:07pm

Sun October 26, 2014
Around the Nation

As Downtown LA Grows, So Does Urgency To Fix Skid Row

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 10:03 am

Los Angeles' Skid Row contains one of the largest concentrations of homeless people in the United States.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

In Los Angeles, more than a thousand people sleep on the street in cardboard boxes and tents — just a mile away from City Hall.

This is Skid Row, and compared to the affluent downtown areas that practically surround it, the area is like a different planet. Fifty blocks of sidewalk are jammed with people who live on the street, with all of their worldly possessions crammed into shopping carts and crates.

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5:30pm

Sun October 26, 2014
The Two-Way

LeVar Burton Reads 'Go The [Expletive] To Sleep'

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 8:42 am

Former Reading Rainbow host LeVar Burton reads from the 2011 best-seller Go the [bleep] to Sleep.
YouTube

In case any over-exhausted parents might wonder if they're hallucinating, we can assure you: Former Reading Rainbow host LeVar Burton did actually give a reading of the 2011 best-seller Go the [bleep] to Sleep this weekend.

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