Kathy Lohr

Whether covering the manhunt and eventual capture of Eric Robert Rudolph in the mountains of North Carolina, the remnants of the Oklahoma City federal building with its twisted metal frame and shattered glass, flood-ravaged Midwestern communities, or the terrorist bombings across the country, including the blast that exploded in Centennial Olympic Park in downtown Atlanta, correspondent Kathy Lohr has been at the heart of stories all across the nation.

Lohr was NPR's first reporter based in the Midwest. She opened NPR's St. Louis office in 1990 and the Atlanta bureau in 1996. Lohr covers the abortion issue on an ongoing basis for NPR, including political and legal aspects. She has often been sent into disasters as they are happening, to provide listeners with the intimate details about how these incidents affect people and their lives.

Lohr filed her first report for NPR while working for member station KCUR in Kansas City, Missouri. She graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia, and began her journalism career in commercial television and radio as a reporter/anchor. Lohr also became involved in video production for national corporations and taught courses in television reporting and radio production at universities in Kansas and Missouri. She has filed reports for the NPR documentary program Horizons, the BBC, the CBC, Marketplace, and she was published in the Saturday Evening Post.

Lohr won the prestigious Missouri Medal of Honor for Excellence in Journalism in 2002. She received a fellowship from Vanderbilt University for work on the issue of domestic violence. Lohr has filed reports from 27 states and the District of Columbia. She has received other national awards for her coverage of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games, the Oklahoma City bombing, the Midwestern floods of 1993, and for her reporting on ice storms in the Mississippi Delta. She has also received numerous awards for radio pieces on the local level prior to joining NPR's national team. Lohr was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska. She now lives in her adopted hometown of Atlanta, covering stories across the southeastern part of the country.

Pages

5:06pm

Wed September 19, 2012
Around the Nation

FAMU Adjusts To Games Without Marching Band

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 7:56 am

Don Juan Moore AP

Florida A&M University played its first home game of the season Saturday — without its famous Marching 100 band for the first time in decades. The band was suspended for the year after drum major Robert Champion died as a result of a band hazing incident. The incident took place after the last football game of the 2011 season.

This year's suspension has left a void at Rattler football games. Just about everyone in Bragg Memorial Stadium for the first home game was talking about it.

Read more

3:31am

Tue September 11, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

Atlanta Symphony Locked Out

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 3:49 pm

The Atlanta Symphony performs at New York City's Carnegie Hall in 2011.
Jennifer Taylor

The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and its musicians are at an impasse. The players' contract expired at the end of last month. The symphony is facing a $20 million budget deficit, and it's seeking millions in concessions from the musicians. Both sides say they want to reach an agreement, but they've left the bargaining table, putting the orchestra's 68th season in jeopardy.

Read more

5:06pm

Fri August 24, 2012
Election 2012

In Akin's Wake, Ryan Defends Anti-Abortion Record

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 8:27 pm

Republican vice presidential candidate Rep. Paul Ryan speaks at a campaign event in Fayetteville, N.C., on Thursday.
Sara D. Davis AP

Since Republican Rep. Todd Akin first said the words "legitimate rape" Sunday, just about everyone in the Republican Party has condemned those comments.

The Missouri Senate candidate later apologized, but his remarks continue to drive the political debate. They've also raised questions about the anti-abortion record of the Republican vice presidential candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin.

Read more

5:14pm

Thu August 23, 2012
Around the Nation

A City Leveled By Hurricane Andrew Rebuilds — Again

Originally published on Thu August 23, 2012 6:43 pm

An aerial view of Homestead, Fla., taken on Sept. 7, 1992, two weeks after Hurricane Andrew's 165-mile-per-hour winds took out nearly every building in the city.
AP

Twenty years ago, Homestead, Fla., was in the eye of what was then the worst storm to hit the United States.

Fifteen people died directly from Hurricane Andrew and a few dozen more died from injuries later. Tens of thousands of homes were destroyed. Andrew's 165-mile-per-hour winds took out nearly every building in Homestead, leaving tens of thousands homeless. Families spent hours in lines to get water and ice.

National Guard troops handed out bags of ice but limited how much each family could get.

Read more

4:58am

Mon July 30, 2012
Crime In The City

Writer Has A Down-Home Feel For Atlanta's Dark Side

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 8:24 am

Writer Karin Slaughter has seen the fallout of some of Atlanta's most gruesome crimes and most dramatic transitions.
David Goldman AP

Best-selling crime novelist Karin Slaughter (yes, that's her real name) grew up just south of Atlanta in the 1970s and '80s, when the city saw some of its most gruesome crimes: A rash of child murders in which dozens of African-American children disappeared, their bodies turning up in nearby woods and rivers. The realization that horrid crimes can happen even to children changed Slaughter's life.

Read more

6:53am

Thu July 19, 2012
Around the Nation

Civil Rights Group, SCLC, Tries To Remain Relevant

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 8:00 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

The civil rights organization co-founded by Martin Luther King Junior meets in Sanford, Florida today for its annual convention. The Southern Christian Leadership Conference has struggled in recent years with leadership battles and declining membership. Now members want to rebrand the SCLC. Here's NPR's Kathy Lohr.

Read more

3:03am

Fri June 22, 2012
Politics

Some Immigrant Students Still Dreaming Of Clarity

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 7:17 am

Jovanna Hernandez carries a sign in support of young illegal immigrants during a protest march, which concluded in front of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Philadelphia in March.
Alex Brandon AP

One question left unanswered by President Obama's announcement last week that he would stop deportations of some young illegal immigrants was what the policy change will mean for students.

Read more

5:00am

Thu June 14, 2012
American Dreams: Then And Now

Immigration Law Slows A Family's March Forward

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 10:33 am

U.S.-born Angel Luis Cruz, the son of Dominican immigrants, owns an insurance company in South Carolina. He says anti-illegal immigration laws have hurt his business.
Kathy Lohr NPR

Immigrant success stories are closely woven into the concept of the American dream. In South Carolina, two generations of an immigrant family have worked hard to live out their dreams, but anti-illegal immigration laws have put even legal immigrants like them on edge.

Working Upon Arrival

Read more

6:00am

Sun June 10, 2012
Around the Nation

Southern Farmers See Midwestern Bias In Farm Bill

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 4:58 pm

Georgia farmer Donald Chase says the Senate's proposed farm bill favors farmers in the Midwest and leaves Southern farmers without a safety net.
Kathy Lohr NPR

Southeast of Macon, Ga., near Oglethorpe, rows of peanuts planted six weeks ago have sprouted. Tiny yellow flowers dot the rich-green plants. Donald Chase, his father and grandfather have owned this farm since the 1950s.

Like many southern farmers, Chase objects to the version of the farm bill kicking around in the Senate this week. The bill aims to do away with direct payments to farmers by expanding crop insurance programs.

Read more

5:23am

Wed May 16, 2012
Around the Nation

International Travelers Welcome Atlanta's New Air Terminal

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 6:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A new international terminal opens today at the Atlanta Airport. Hartsfield-Jackson International is already the busiest airport in the world. And the new terminal reflects a big by the business capital of the South to become a bigger global player. Georgia wants to attract more international business. NPR's Kathy Lohr has the story.

Read more

3:02am

Tue May 15, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Should Parents Be Able To Sue For 'Wrongful Birth'?

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 9:51 am

Arizona state Sen. Nancy Barto, R-Phoenix, listens during a special budget briefing at the state Capitol in October 2008. Barto sponsored a new law that prohibits wrongful birth lawsuits. She says the bill "sends the message that all life is worth protecting."
Ross D. Franklin AP

Several states, including Kansas and New Jersey, are debating so-called "wrongful birth" laws that would prevent parents from suing a doctor who fails to warn them about fetal problems.

Abortion rights activists say the laws give doctors the right to withhold information so women don't have abortions.

In Suffern, N.Y., Sharon and Steven Hoffman's son, Jake, was born with Tay-Sachs, a genetic disease that mainly affects Jewish families and is usually fatal by age 4 or 5.

"There's no treatment. There's no cure. There's nothing," Sharon says.

Read more

4:39pm

Wed April 25, 2012
It's All Politics

Gingrich's Unconventional White House Bid: A Retrospective

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 8:28 pm

Newt Gingrich speaks at Marquette University in Milwaukee on March 29.
Rick Wood MCT/Landov

Newt Gingrich has experienced a long slide since March 6, when he won Georgia's Republican primary. It was his second and final victory of the campaign season, but Gingrich fought to stay in the race through a Southern strategy that never caught on.

On Wednesday, a source close to the Gingrich campaign told NPR that he would officially suspend his campaign next week, and was likely to formally endorse Mitt Romney.

Read more

8:00am

Sun April 8, 2012
Around the Nation

The Story Goes On For Trayvon Martin's Hometown

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 12:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

From Tulsa, we move our focus back to the city of Sanford, Florida, where Trayvon Martin, an unarmed African-American teen, was shot and killed six weeks ago by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. The constant spotlight has brought the issue of race to the forefront, and with it some tense moments in that Florida community. NPR's Kathy Lohr spent the last week in Sanford and has this story.

Read more

12:46pm

Thu April 5, 2012
U.S.

How Lawyer Got Nation Talking About Trayvon Martin

Benjamin Crump (right), the attorney for Trayvon Martin's family, is joined by the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jessie Jackson at a protest in Sanford, Fla., last week. Crump has enlisted the help of prominent civil rights activists to draw attention to the case.
Roberto Gonzalez Getty Images

The prosecutor investigating the shooting of Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla., has not yet decided if she will bring charges against the shooter, George Zimmerman.

It took several weeks for the Feb. 26 shooting to draw the nation's attention — after Benjamin Crump, the attorney for Trayvon Martin's family, launched a campaign to get the case before media and civil rights activists nationwide.

Two days after the shooting, the high-profile civil rights attorney started getting calls about the case. "My phone was buzzing," Crump says.

Read more

12:01am

Wed March 28, 2012
Law

In Southern States, Immigration Law Battle Rages On

Originally published on Wed March 28, 2012 8:21 pm

A protester blocks an Atlanta street during a rally protesting Georgia's new immigration law in June 2011. Now, the state's lawmakers are considering a bill that would also ban students here illegally from attending all public colleges.
John Bazemore AP

Last year, several states passed strict laws aimed at cracking down on illegal immigration. Those laws are now being challenged in federal court, and next month the Supreme Court is set to hear arguments on Arizona's immigration law — but that hasn't stopped some Southern states from moving forward with more restrictions.

Read more

4:00am

Fri March 23, 2012
U.S.

Outcry Grows As Fla. Shooter Remains Unprosecuted

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's go now to Florida, where late yesterday Governor Rick Scott announced that a new state attorney has been assigned to investigate the shooting death of Trayvon Martin. The announcement came as thousands rallied in Sanford demanding justice for Martin. The teen was shot as he walked unarmed in Sanford, a suburb of Orlando. The shooter, George Zimmerman, is a volunteer neighborhood watch captain and he claims self-defense. He's also not been arrested. As NPR's Kathy Lohr reports, the cry is growing louder for an arrest to be made.

Read more

3:00pm

Thu March 22, 2012
NPR Story

Sanford, Fla. Police Chief To 'Step Aside'

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

In Sanford, Florida, the police chief at the center of a controversial killing says he is temporarily stepping down. Chief Bill Lee says he has become a distraction in the case.

Read more

8:42am

Mon March 12, 2012
It's All Politics

Heading Into Tuesday's Vote, GOP Candidates Seek Southern Comfort

Originally published on Mon March 12, 2012 5:02 pm

Rick Santorum greets supporters during a rally at Lookout Steakhouse in Gulfport, Miss., on Sunday.
John Fitzhugh MCT/Landov
  • Listen to the Story on Morning Edition

With three wins on Super Tuesday, and a victory in the Kansas caucuses over the weekend, GOP hopeful Rick Santorum is on a high — and campaigning hard in the South.

"This is going to be a very close race here in Mississippi, and I know the same thing is true in Alabama. We've got lots of folks down here working hard," Santorum told a crowd at Weidmann's historic restaurant in Meridian, Miss., on Sunday.

Read more

4:00am

Mon March 12, 2012
Around the Nation

Santorum, Gingrich Eye Southern Primary Victories

Originally published on Mon March 12, 2012 11:03 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Read more

3:44am

Tue February 21, 2012
Newt Gingrich

Georgia On His Mind, Gingrich Faces Key Primary

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich waves during a campaign stop Friday in Peachtree City, Ga. Doing well in the state's primary is important for Gingrich because he represented a congressional district there for 20 years.
Evan Vucci AP

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is facing his most important challenge yet — winning Georgia on Super Tuesday. Georgia is considered Gingrich's home because he represented parts of the state in Congress for 20 years, but he hasn't lived there for more than a decade.

Over the weekend, Gingrich held several rallies, including one in Peachtree City, south of Atlanta, where he stressed that this area has long supported him.

"It is great to be home," Gingrich told the crowd. "I believe that I carried Fayette County in every single election, including the two that I lost."

Read more

4:05pm

Fri January 20, 2012
Election 2012

In Backing Romney, Haley Seen As Political Enigma

Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney and his wife Ann wish a happy birthday to South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley (left) at Romney's campaign headquarters in Charleston, S.C., on Thursday.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, one of the Tea Party's early superstars, has seen her approval ratings fall, and some of her core supporters are baffled by Haley's endorsement of former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.

Haley won election in 2010 as a true fiscal conservative, capturing the endorsement of Sarah Palin, who said Haley was willing to challenge the good old boys of the state's politics.

Read more

2:38am

Tue January 17, 2012
Business

Move Over, Delta: Southwest To Fly Out Of Atlanta

Originally published on Tue January 17, 2012 8:46 am

Two Southwest Airlines jets are seen in front of a taxiing Delta jet at Philadelphia International Airport in 2004.
George Widman AP

Southwest Airlines prides itself on being different from other carriers. Next month, it's going to have to highlight those differences when it starts flying out of Atlanta — home to Delta Air Lines and the country's busiest airport, Hartsfield-Jackson International.

Read more

4:02pm

Mon January 9, 2012
Health

Controversy Swirls Around Harsh Anti-Obesity Ads

Originally published on Mon January 9, 2012 8:17 pm

In one of the print ads in Children's Healthcare of Atlanta's Strong4Life campaign, a young girl says she doesn't like going to school, because "all the other kids pick on me. It hurts my feelings."
Courtesy of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

Stark billboards and television commercials that feature overweight kids are part of a controversial anti-obesity campaign in Atlanta. The goal of the "Stop Sugarcoating It, Georgia" ads is to shock families into recognizing that obesity is a problem.

The campaign is making an impact, but the tactics are raising questions.

Read more

5:05pm

Thu December 22, 2011
Newt Gingrich

As Gingrich Stumps In Iowa, His Style Evolves

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich's campaign has been down and then up this year.

His top staffers resigned en masse in June, leading many to wonder whether he was out of the race. Then came debates in which the former speaker of the House shined.

Read more

4:03pm

Wed December 21, 2011
Still No Job: Over A Year Without Enough Work

Who Gives The Long-Term Jobless A Helping Hand?

Originally published on Wed December 21, 2011 9:15 pm

More than 40 percent of the long-term unemployed say they've received a lot of help from family and friends. But only 1 in 10 reports getting much help from churches or community groups, according to an NPR/Kaiser Family Foundation poll.

While family may be the first stop for help, these groups say they're indeed seeing large numbers of people who have been out of work a long time.

'We're Overwhelmed Now'

Read more

6:30am

Wed December 21, 2011
Election 2012

Romney, Gingrich Spar Over Negative Super PAC Ads

There's a spirited debate going on between GOP presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich. A Super PAC called Restore Our Future is running negative ads against Gingrich on Romney's behalf. Gingrich called on Romney to get the ads off the air. Romney responded by saying the law does not allow him to communicate with a Super PAC.

4:00am

Tue December 20, 2011
Election 2012

Gingrich Holds Iowa Town Hall Meeting

GOP presidential candidate Newt Gingrich is accusing his Republican opponents of what he says is reprehensible behavior — running attack ads in Iowa against the former House Speaker. Before a crowd of supporters in Hiawatha, Iowa, Gingrich stressed that the negative GOP attack ads are bad for the party and bad for voters.

7:41am

Sat December 3, 2011
Politics

Gingrich's Popularity: A Winning Boost?

Originally published on Sat December 3, 2011 8:36 pm

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich has seen a recent bump in the polls. More criticism is sure to come, but Gingrich says he doesn't think attacks from other candidates will be effective.
Richard Shiro AP

Newt Gingrich is now the focus of the race to become the GOP presidential nominee — and with that comes the heat. His main opposition, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney went on the attack Friday, but Gingrich insists he'll stay positive. The big question is whether the former House speaker can sustain his surge in the polls.

Read more

4:00am

Thu December 1, 2011
Election 2012

Gingrich Attracts Crowds In South Carolina

Originally published on Thu December 1, 2011 5:24 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Read more

3:40pm

Wed November 30, 2011
It's All Politics

In South Carolina, A Resurgent Gingrich Attracts Jubilant Crowds

House Speaker Newt Gingrich talks with Rep. John Kasich of Ohio while President Bill Clinton signs the Balanced Budget Agreement on the South Lawn of the White House in 1997.
PAUL J. RICHARDS AFP/Getty Images

Newt Gingrich traveled across South Carolina this week appearing at a number of town-hall-style meetings where he talked to voters and answered questions — mostly the same questions at every stop. He talked about the improving the economy, creating a new immigration policy, repealing President Obama's health care reform plan and transforming Washington.

Read more

Pages