Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

If you missed the total eclipse of the moon in April, you might have another chance: On Wednesday morning, the second of four lunar eclipses this year and next will occur.

Updated at 11:35 a.m. ET

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is warning that the Syrian border town of Kobani is on the verge of being captured by the self-declared Islamic State.

"Kobani is about to fall," he told Syrian refugees in the Turkish town of Gaziantep, near the border.

Islamic State fighters using tanks and heavy weapons captured from Iraqi and Syrian forces have pounded the city for days. Meanwhile, Turkish tanks have deployed near the border close to the fighting but have not intervened.

Update at 1:15 p.m. ET

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says details on the measures to screen air passengers for Ebola, mentioned Monday by President Obama, will be announced this week.

Thomas Frieden, in an interview with All Things Considered, says he's "confident that you'll hear about it this week."

"When we tell you about it this week, we'll tell you when we'll start," Frieden says.

A trio of scientists, two from Japan and one from the U.S., will share the Nobel Prize in physics for the invention of blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which led to a new, environmentally friendly light source.

Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano of Japan and U.S. scientist Shuji Nakamura were selected by the committee of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences to share the 8 million Swedish kronor ($1.1 million) prize.

Nobelprize.org says:

Freelance journalist Ashoka Mukpo, who contracted Ebola in Liberia, arrived at the University of Nebraska Medical Center today, becoming the second patient with the deadly disease to be treated there.

Update at 11:25 a.m. ET

Kinsey Wilson, who has been a driving force behind NPR's digital strategy for the past six years, will leave the network, NPR CEO Jarl Mohn announced today.

Wilson, an executive vice president and chief content officer, "is widely credited with positioning NPR as a leader in the digital space, building editorial excellence and growing audience across platforms," Mohn said in a memo to staff.

Six months after Malaysia Airlines MH370 disappeared from radar en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, Australia has resumed a search in the Indian Ocean for possible wreckage.

The Associated Press says: "The GO Phoenix is one of three ships that will spend up to a year hunting for the wreckage. It arrived in the search area about 1,800 kilometers (1,100 miles) west of Australia on Monday. [Two other] ships will join the hunt later this month."

The number of pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong has dwindled today after a weekend that saw dozens of arrests and an angry backlash from business owners whose shops were shut down amid the demonstrations.

The South China Morning Post says: "Protest sites are quiet on Monday as some demonstrators leave for work, others remain and authorities keep their distance."

Updated at 10:20 a.m. ET

The condition of a man infected with the Ebola virus who is undergoing treatment in Dallas is "fighting for his life," doctors say, as another patient with the disease has arrived in Nebraska to receive care.

Thomas Eric Duncan, in isolation at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, became ill after arriving from the West African country of Liberia two weeks ago.

Update at 7:05 a.m. ET

Three neuroscientists from Europe will share the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of how the brain determines where the body is in space.

Health officials say they have halved the number of people they are actively monitoring for symptoms of Ebola after possible contact with a patient with the disease being treated in Dallas. They lowered the number of so-called "contact traces" from 100 to 50 after deciding that many posed of the people posed no risk of infection.

As we reported last month, Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced that a team of archaeologists had discovered one of two ships from a doomed Arctic expedition 160 years ago. At the time, the searchers weren't sure if they'd found British Capt. Sir John Franklin's HMS Erebus or the HMS Terror.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

The U.S. unemployment rate dipped below 6 percent for the first time since July 2008, with nonfarm payrolls adding 248,000 new jobs in September, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports.

Fierce fighting has been reported today near the border between Syria and Turkey as militants with the self-declared Islamic State step up their efforts to capture the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobani.

Kurdish fighters defending the town have warned of a likely massacre if the extremist group, also known as ISIS or ISIL, succeeds in seizing the encircled settlement.

Reuters reports:

Updated at 12:55 p.m. ET

Hong Kong's main democracy groups called off planned talks with the territory's government after several hundred pro-Beijing demonstrators attacked activists who have staged a week of protests calling for greater freedom.

Occupy Central, one of the main groups organizing protests against Beijing's effort to tightly control the selection of Hong Kong's leader, tweeted today:

Update, 10 p.m. ET: Officials at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital now say Thomas Eric Duncan wasn't honest with them either. When asked if he had been around anyone who had been ill, Duncan told them he had not.

As we wrote Wednesday, Duncan's neighbors in the Liberian capital, Monrovia, believe he was infected while helping a pregnant woman with Ebola to a hospital.

Fighting has resumed in eastern Ukraine as pro-Russian separatists have broken a much-violated nearly month-long truce in order to launch a military push to capture the government-held airport in Donetsk.

Reuters reports that the renewed fighting, which began on Wednesday, has escalated. Al-Jazeera reports "thick black smoke" over the airport on Thursday.

Updated at 3:42 p.m. ET:

The number of "contact traces" for a man diagnosed with Ebola earlier this week in Dallas has risen to 100, officials say, as they add secondary contacts to a list of people being monitored for symptoms of the deadly virus.

Earlier today, Erikka Neros, a spokeswoman for the Dallas County Health and Human Services department, said the number of "contact traces" stood at about 80 because the 12 to 18 people who had been exposed directly to the patient then had contact with others.

Updated at 8:40 a.m. ET

A United Nations report out today lists what it describes as a "staggering array" of possible war crimes and crimes against humanity by the self-declared Islamic State in Iraq, including mass executions, the kidnapping of women and girls to use as sex slaves and the use of child soldiers.

It also points to shelling and airstrikes by Iraqi security forces that killed civilians and "may have violated the principles of distinction and proportionality under international humanitarian law."

Updated at 5:28 p.m. ET

Hong Kong's leader said today that his government has agreed to hold a dialogue with pro-democracy student activists to discuss reforms, but that such a discussion must take place within the context of Chinese law. He also renewed warnings to protesters not to occupy government buildings.

Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying appeared at a news conference with Chief Secretary Carrie Lam less than half an hour before a deadline set by student activists for his resignation.

An official from the Texas hospital where an Ebola patient is being treated says a nurse using a checklist for the disease learned that he had traveled from West Africa, but that the information was "not communicated" to doctors making the diagnosis.

Dr. Mark Lester, of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, told reporters at a news conference this afternoon that as a result of the miscommunication, the team of physicians evaluating the patient concluded at the time he was first examined at the hospital on Friday that he suffered from a "low-grade common viral disease."

Following word of the first case of Ebola diagnosed in the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as well as major news organizations have weighed in. While the development is a concern, the basic message seems to be this: Don't panic.

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET

The number of dead from a volcanic eruption in Japan has climbed to nearly 50 after more victims were recovered from Mt. Ontake, which unexpectedly spewed toxic gas last week as people hiked near the 10,000-foot summit.

The Japan Times says:

"Precarious conditions at the summit have made the search an on-off effort, and other bodies may still be undiscovered.

A human rights group reports that Islamic State militants in a Kurdish area of northern Syria have beheaded seven men and three women as part of an apparent campaign to quell resistance to the group.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights says the 10 people, including four Syrian rebels, were detained and then beheaded on Tuesday, about 8 miles west of the city of Kobani, a Kurdish town near the Turkish border that has been under siege from the Islamist group for weeks.

A deadline set by Hong Kong's pro-democracy demonstrators for the territory's leader to step down has passed without his resignation, triggering a new phase to the protests that have brought parts of the Asian financial hub to a standstill.

Protesters, who took to the streets by the tens of thousands last week to demand the open election of Hong Kong's next leader, heckled the territory's Beijing-appointed chief executive, Leung Chun-ying, during a flag-raising ceremony to mark China's National Day.

Two container ships, the German-flagged MV Colombo Express and the Singapore-flagged MV Maersk Tanjong, collided on Monday at the north end of the Suez Canal, delaying traffic.

Update at 9:55 a.m. ET

Afghanistan has signed a pact with the U.S. to allow about 10,000 troops to remain in the country after the end of the year, when most American forces are to be withdrawn.

The country's newly inaugurated president, Ashraf Ghani, signed the Bilateral Security Agreement, or BSA, which would leave in place the U.S. troops and a few others from NATO allies to bolster Afghan forces.

Update at 1:50 p.m. ET

Secret Service Director Julia Pierson faced a tough inquiry by lawmakers today as she appeared before a House committee to answer questions about the Sept. 19 White House security breach in which a man with a knife entered the executive mansion.

Updated at 8:30 a.m. ET

Hong Kong leader Leung Chun-ying is appealing to pro-democracy demonstrators who've brought parts of the Asian financial hub to a standstill in recent days to halt their campaign "immediately" because, he says, Beijing won't accede to their demands. But protesters have promised to announce a new phase of civil disobedience if reforms aren't forthcoming.

Some might say a group of Swedish scientists have "got a lot of nerve," running a 17-year secret contest to hide as many Bob Dylan lyrics as possible in their scholarly articles. The attitude of others, no doubt: "Don't think twice, it's all right."

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