All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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4:37pm

Fri October 24, 2014
Africa

Boko Haram Hasn't Acted On Promise To Release Kidnapped Girls

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 6:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:33pm

Fri October 24, 2014
Energy

Wanted: Wind Turbine Mechanic — Must Be Daredevil, Skilled With Hands

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 6:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:33pm

Fri October 24, 2014
Europe

U.K.'s Relationship With EU In A Rough Patch

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 6:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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In the EU people can settle anywhere without a work visa or other special permission. That has become a source of tension between the EU and the United Kingdom. Prime Minister Cameron wants to limit immigration in Europe. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports from London.

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4:33pm

Fri October 24, 2014
Health

New York City Praised For Response To New Ebola Patient

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 6:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

6:50pm

Thu October 23, 2014
All Tech Considered

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:57 pm

The Fairfax County 911 Center in Virginia takes calls during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. It was relatively easy to locate callers when most people used landlines. But most 911 calls now come from cellphones, which can pinpoint a callers' location only within 100 to 300 meters.
Greg E. Mathieson Sr. Mai/Landov

Today's mobile phones can do almost everything a computer can. But we still need them for their most basic purpose: making phone calls — especially in emergencies.

Yet existing technology can't always pinpoint a caller's location, particularly when a 911 caller is indoors.

The Federal Communications Commission has proposed new regulations for wireless carriers to help address the problem, but so far, wireless providers are resisting the changes.

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6:35pm

Thu October 23, 2014
Around the Nation

Park Service Construction Damaged Native American Burial Sites

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 2:10 pm

Jim Nepstad, superintendent of Effigy Mounds National Monument in northeast Iowa, stands at the top of a bluff looking over the Mississippi River.
Clay Masters NPR

Imagine being able to drive an all-terrain vehicle right up next to a sacred earthen Native American burial mound.

At Effigy Mounds National Monument, you can. Three million dollars' worth of illegal construction projects went on for a decade at one of the nation's most sacred Native American burial grounds in northeast Iowa. And it happened under the watch of the National Park Service.

The park didn't do the proper archaeological studies before installing an intricate boardwalk system that now encircles ancient burial mounds that are shaped like bears and birds.

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5:29pm

Thu October 23, 2014
Law

ACLU Challenges Miami Law On Behalf Of Homeless Sex Offenders

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 8:15 pm

This encampment under the Julia Tuttle Causeway in Miami, shown in 2008, was cleared out by authorities in 2009. It was home to sex offenders who were unable to find places where they were permitted to live under Miami-Dade County's strict residency law. Although this makeshift community was broken up, homeless sex offenders continue to camp out in other areas of the county.
David Adame AP

Miami-Dade County's sex offender residency restrictions — some of the tightest in the country — drew national attention a few years ago when an encampment of sex offenders sprang up on a causeway in Biscayne Bay. After a public outcry, local and state authorities evicted several dozen people, mostly men, from that makeshift settlement.

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4:49pm

Thu October 23, 2014
Politics

Democrats Remain Optimistic About Senate, Gubernatorial Races

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 5:50 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:39pm

Thu October 23, 2014
Global Health

Why Do Ebola Mortality Rates Vary So Widely?

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:31pm

Thu October 23, 2014
Around the Nation

In Missouri, A Tale Of Two Fergusons

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:29pm

Thu October 23, 2014
Politics and Government

Onondaga County asks state for help with jail overcrowding

The Onondaga County Justice Center in Syracuse. (file photo)
Ellen Abbott WRVO

Onondaga County says part of its jail overcrowding problem could be eased with a little help from New York State. Lawmakers are asking the state to make changes in a policy regarding state prisoners who’ve run afoul of their parole.

Right now, Onondaga County is forced to take state prisoners, who have violated parole, and keep them in the local jail while the justice system decides whether to send them back to state prison. County officials say that policy is squeezing an overcrowded county jail even more.  

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6:28pm

Wed October 22, 2014
World

Soldier, Gunman Dead After Ottawa Shooting

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:26pm

Wed October 22, 2014
Environment

Coping In A Drier World: California's Drought Survival Strategy

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 7:44 pm

The San Luis Reservoir in central California is the largest "off-channel" reservoir in the U.S. It is currently at less than 30 percent of its normal capacity.
Kirk Siegler NPR

The past few years have been California's driest on record. Forecasters predict that punishing droughts like the current one could become the new norm.

The state uses water rationing and a 90-year-old water distribution system to cope until the rains come. The system is a huge network of dams, canals and pipes that move water from the places it rains and snows to places it typically doesn't, like farms and cities.

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4:32pm

Wed October 22, 2014
Music Reviews

Music Review: 'You're Dead!' By Flying Lotus

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 6:28 pm

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4:32pm

Wed October 22, 2014
Latin America

In 'Perfect Dictatorship,' Mexican Viewers May Struggle To Decipher Fact From Fiction

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 6:28 pm

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4:32pm

Wed October 22, 2014
U.S.

How Did 'Good Girls' From Colorado Get Recruited By ISIS?

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 6:28 pm

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7:05am

Wed October 22, 2014
Remembrances

'Post' Editor Bradlee Helped Define Modern American Journalism

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 10:09 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

6:19pm

Tue October 21, 2014
Shots - Health News

Ebola Vaccine Could Start Testing In Africa By January

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 10:22 am

Patients in a clinic line up to get a smallpox shot on Feb. 24, 1962, in Leopoldville, Congo. Health workers used vaccination campaigns to finally eradicate smallpox by 1980.
AP

The World Health Organization says that efforts are on track to distribute an experimental Ebola vaccine in West Africa in January.

Two potential vaccines are now being tested for safety in people, and Russia is developing another one. While quantities will be limited, scientists say even a relatively small supply of vaccine can help bring the epidemic under control.

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5:56pm

Tue October 21, 2014
Politics

Hochul touts Cuomo's economic record during upstate visit

Kathy Hochul, the Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor, speaks at a gathering of supporters in Oswego.
Gino Geruntino WRVO

Gov. Andrew Cuomo's running mate this fall, former Buffalo-area Rep. Kathy Hochul, says the governor's initiatives, including Start-Up NY and the establishment of ten regional economic development councils, have helped spur additional growth in all areas, particularly upstate.

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5:44pm

Tue October 21, 2014
Around the Nation

In More Cities, That Doggie In The Window Is Not For Sale

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 11:47 am

A puppy waits at an adoption event in Miami last year. The city is now considering a ban on the sale of puppies in retail pet stores. Cities and towns in several states have passed similar bans, aimed at cracking down on substandard, large-scale puppy breeders.
Wilfredo Lee AP

Just about everyone loves puppies. But around the country, there's heated disagreement about where, and from whom, people can get one.

While the large national pet store chains don't sell dogs, other chains and shops do. But in several states, including Florida, cities are passing laws that ban puppy sales in pet stores.

At the Petland store in Plantation, Fla., a suburb of Ft. Lauderdale, customers come in all day long to look at and play with the puppies. At this store, in fact, doggie accessories and puppies are all that owner Vicki Siegel sells.

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5:27pm

Tue October 21, 2014
Remembrances

Model Remembers Oscar De La Renta As An 'Extraordinary Gentleman'

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 8:48 am

Bethann Hardison said that Oscar de la Renta wasn't scared about putting models of color on the runway in his clothes.
Evan Agostini AP

Bethann Hardison was one of the "spiritual mothers of the supermodels who ruled the '90s," and she credited some of her rise to prominence to Oscar de la Renta, the influential Dominican-born fashion designer who died this week at the age of 82.

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5:27pm

Tue October 21, 2014
Asia

North Korea Allows Detained American To Leave

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 7:01 am

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7:48pm

Mon October 20, 2014
Business

Unrest In Ferguson May Speed Up Decline Of Real Estate

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 1:09 pm

Children watch from their home in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 20 as people march about a mile to the police station to protest the shooting of Michael Brown. Brown's shooting in the middle of a street by a Ferguson police officer on Aug. 9 sparked protests, riots and looting in the St. Louis suburb. Some people are ready to leave the troubled city. Others say they will remain no matter what.
Charlie Riedel AP

A grand jury has yet to decide whether it will indict Darren Wilson, the police officer who fatally shot 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., this summer.

Protests over Brown's death are ongoing in Ferguson, though they are calmer than the sometimes violent clashes that happened immediately after the shooting.

Still, many residents there are worried about public reaction once the grand jury announces its decision, and some say they've had enough. They're planning to move. That could accelerate an already existing trend in the region.

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7:19pm

Mon October 20, 2014
Politics

Katko picks up endorsement from several law enforcement unions

Republican John Katko is running against Democratic incumbent Dan Maffei to represent New York's 24th Congressional District. (file photo)
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Unions representing law enforcement officers in central New York are throwing their support behind former federal prosecutor John Katko in his race against Democratic incumbent Rep. Dan Maffei for the 24th Congressional District seat.

Syracuse Police Benevolent Association President Jeffrey Piedmonte says the main reason he’s speaking out is because he’s irritated about Democratic attack ads that accuse Katko of being light on crime, especially in connection with the plea agreement offered to former Oswego Mayor John Gosek for a sex crime.  

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4:44pm

Mon October 20, 2014
Book News & Features

'Lila' Sets The Stage For Marilynn Robinson's Earlier Works

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 6:03 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:44pm

Mon October 20, 2014
All Tech Considered

Tunisia's Emerging Tech Sector Hampered By Old Policies

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 8:56 am

Ramzi El-Fekih, CEO of Creova, stands in his server room in Tunis. He has built a mobile payments company, but because of banking restrictions, Tunisians can use his product only for domestic purchases.
Aarti Shahani NPR

This Sunday, Tunisia — the country that gave birth to Arab Spring — will elect a Parliament. Millions of citizens will vote at the polls, and thousands will run for office.

It's a sea change since the days of ousted dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. But behind the political gains, there is a sad fact: The new democracy is at an economic standstill. The technology sector — which many say could deliver jobs to unemployed young people — is victim to political inertia.

Startups In A Closed Economy

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4:44pm

Mon October 20, 2014
Author Interviews

From Sizzling Fajitas To The Super Bowl, How Sounds Help Sell

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 6:11 pm

cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Joel Beckerman believes we are living in a golden age of sound: "We have these amazing opportunities to both set the tone and experiences for people, give them information in an instant," he tells NPR's Audie Cornish.

Beckerman is a composer who specializes in sonic branding — and we're not just talking about jingles. These are the sonic cues in commercials, the ambient music in coffee shops, in the beeps, dings and whoosh that occasionally flies from your cellphone. And companies are embracing it.

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7:09pm

Sun October 19, 2014
Author Interviews

Many Views Of Muhammad, As A Man And As A Prophet

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 1:04 pm

The Lives of Muhammad book cover

The Prophet Muhammad, the founder of Islam, was one of the most influential men in human history — but there's little we can say about his life with historical certainty. The details of his life have been debated and manipulated ever since he walked the earth in the seventh century.

Boston University professor Kecia Ali's new book, The Lives of Muhammad, examines those divergent narratives. In it, she explores the different ways the prophet's life story has been told and retold, by both Muslims and non-Muslims, from the earliest days of Islam to the present.

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7:09pm

Sun October 19, 2014
Around the Nation

Why Did The Mountain Lion Cross The Freeway? To Breed

The proposed overpass would allow mountain lions to cross this section of freeway. One mountain lion was hit near here after apparently failing to make it over this wall.
Arun Rath NPR

In Los Angeles' Griffith Park, there is a mountain lion known as the "Hollywood Lion."

The big cat — known as P22 to ecologists — somehow made it across two very busy freeways to get there. Mountain lions like solitude, but if P22 wants to find a mate and have some cubs, he'll have to risk his life again in Los Angeles traffic.

P22's dilemma is one faced by an entire population of mountain lions along the 101 Freeway, less than 30 miles away from Griffith Park. The freeway slices right across the wilderness in this stretch of the Santa Monica Mountains.

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7:09pm

Sun October 19, 2014
My Big Break

From Mannequin To Actor: Geena Davis' 'Ridiculous, Ridiculous' Break

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 8:53 am

After college, Geena Davis got a job at an Ann Taylor clothing store. Then she noticed an empty chair in a window display, and she decided to sit down and freeze. "I was a live mannequin," she says.
Courtesy of Geena Davis

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Oscar-winning actress Geena Davis has played unforgettable roles in movies like Beetlejuice, Thelma and Louise and A League of Their Own, and she's been an outspoken advocate for female representation in cinema and TV.

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