All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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Composer ID: 
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4:13pm

Tue April 15, 2014
Around the Nation

Months Of Training And A Moment Of Silence As Marathon Draws Near

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 5:29 pm

Even as Boston pays tribute to the victims of the marathon bombing, runners are preparing to run in the race next week. NPR is following the stories of eight of these participants, dubbed the "NPR 8."

4:13pm

Tue April 15, 2014
Music Interviews

Perennial Co-Writer Returns With An Album Of His Own

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 5:29 pm

Dan Wilson is your favorite songwriter's favorite co-writer, lending a pen to artists from Nas to Adele. But he also writes music for himself — and he joins the program to talk more about it.

12:14pm

Tue April 15, 2014
Regional Coverage

Onondaga Nation files human rights petition over land claims

Oren Lyons, the faithkeeper for the Onondaga Nation.
Ryan Delaney WRVO file photo

With its domestic options exhausted, the Onondaga Indian Nation has taken its land claim case to an international commission.

It’s been six months since the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the Onondaga’s claim to 2.6 million acres of land in central New York. In the lawsuit first filed in 2005, the nation says land was illegally taken from it in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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6:42pm

Mon April 14, 2014
The Record

Reunited And It Feels A Little Awkward: OutKast At Coachella

Big Boi (left) and Andre 3000 perform on stage at Coachella during the first stop on OutKast's reunion tour.
Adam Kissick for NPR

5:48pm

Mon April 14, 2014
Shots - Health News

Gene Linked To Alzheimer's Poses A Special Threat To Women

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 7:35 pm

Women make up nearly two-thirds of the people in the U.S. diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.
iStockphoto

A gene associated with Alzheimer's disease appears especially dangerous to women and may be one reason that more women than men are diagnosed with the disease.

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5:48pm

Mon April 14, 2014
News

NSA Coverage Garners Pulitzers For Post And Guardian

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

Winners of the 2014 Pulitzer Prizes were announced Monday. The Washington Post and The Guardian were among the notable winners, commended for together breaking the news of NSA surveillance programs.

5:37pm

Mon April 14, 2014
Around the Nation

A 'Roller Coaster' Year For Texas Town Rocked By Blast

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

Firefighters search for survivors at a West, Texas, apartment building in April 2013. The breadth of destruction in West has raised questions about what, if any, new state laws should be passed to help prevent similar accidents in the future.
LM Otero AP

When firetrucks blew through the small town of West, Texas, on the evening of April 17, 2013, sirens screaming, naturally everybody was curious. People got in their cars and went to see the fire at the West fertilizer plant. For 10 minutes, they watched from cars and backyards as the fire grew ever bigger. A few moved as close as they could because they were filming on their smartphones. At no time did it occur to anybody that they might be in danger.

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4:46pm

Mon April 14, 2014
Around the Nation

After Deaths, Renewed Focus On Leaky Gas Pipelines

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

A Philadelphia Gas Works employee replaces old steel and cast-iron pipes with new plastic pipes that are less likely to leak.
Jeff Brady NPR

After a gas explosion last month in New York leveled two buildings and killed eight people, an old issue received new attention: aging natural gas pipelines that leak.

It can take decades and billions of dollars to replace old steel and cast-iron pipes with plastic ones, but some utilities are making that a priority.

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4:01pm

Mon April 14, 2014
News

Nevada Ranch Dispute Ends As Feds Back Down — For Now

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

A standoff between federal agents and a Nevada rancher is over for now. Over the weekend, the Bureau of Land Management released about 400 head of cattle it had rounded up, fearing a violent confrontation. Militia members, including many with guns, had rallied in support of the rancher, Cliven Bundy, and his family. NPR's Ted Robbins has the story.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: No BLM. No BLM. No BLM.

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4:01pm

Mon April 14, 2014
Planet Money

When The Wealthy Need Cash, Pawn Shops Can Be Appealing

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 8:39 pm

This diamond necklace was pawned at New York Loan. It's for sale for $65,000.
Ashley Milne-Tyte NPR

Traditionally, pawn shops have been the last stop for people desperate for cash. But now there's a small but growing group of pawn shops for the wealthy.

Actor and model Regi Huc needed $75,000 in a hurry last year. He was making his first feature film, and needed to do re-shoots before the deadline to enter this year's film festivals.

On paper his finances look good. He owns some buildings in Philadelphia and has a stake in a family business, but he needed that money within a week. He didn't have the cash in his bank account. He didn't have time to apply for a loan.

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4:01pm

Mon April 14, 2014
Space

For All You Need To Know About The Blood Moon, Ask Mr. Eclipse

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 6:42 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MOONDANCE")

VAN MORRISON: (Singing) Well, it's a marvelous night for a moon dance with the stars up above in your eyes.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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6:07pm

Sun April 13, 2014
Africa

Drought Could Complicate Already Difficult Food Crisis In Syria

Originally published on Sun April 13, 2014 7:03 pm

The war in Syria, now in its fourth year, has created a massive humanitarian crisis. More than 2 million Syrians have left the country in an attempt to escape the conflict. Millions more have been displaced inside Syria, forced to leave their homes to survive.

In March, the United Nations World Food Programme reported that a potential drought in the area could significantly hurt food production in Syria:

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6:01pm

Sun April 13, 2014
World

Clashes In Eastern Ukraine Reportedly Turn Deadly

Originally published on Sun April 13, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. Arun Rath is away. I'm Tess Vigeland. The crisis in Eastern Ukraine seems to be worsening. The government in Kiev says it is prepared for a large-scale assault on separatists who have taken over government buildings in cities near the Russian border. Clashes between pro-Russian forces and the Ukrainian government turned deadly in the City of Slavyansk. NPR's Ari Shapiro is in Donetsk and he joins us now with the latest. Ari, tell us what happened overnight.

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4:59pm

Sun April 13, 2014
Your Money

Outdated Tax Code Gives Some Working Spouses A Bad Deal

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 10:07 am

The U.S. tax code, which dates back to the days of Ozzie and Harriet, works against dual-income spouses. In some cases, it's cheaper for one spouse to stay home.
Sherry Yates iStockphoto.com

Women today are nearly half the workforce, and two-income couples are the norm. But the U.S. tax code? It's straight out of Ozzie and Harriet.

When it comes to paying taxes, economists say, a lot of secondary wage-earners are getting a raw deal. It's called the marriage penalty.

"The system was never designed to penalize working spouses," says Melissa Kearney, director of the Hamilton Project at The Brookings Institution. "It was just designed in a different era."

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4:59pm

Sun April 13, 2014
Around the Nation

Keep It Brief, Commencement Speakers! No One Will Remember Anyway

Originally published on Sun April 13, 2014 7:03 pm

Do any of these students remember what Vice President Joe Biden said in June 2012?
Wilfredo Lee AP

6:45pm

Sat April 12, 2014
Sports

By Helping Gay Athletes, Group Hopes To Refocus On Talent

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 1:50 pm

Massachusetts' Derrick Gordon (No. 2) drives past Northern Illinois' Dontel Highsmith (No. 4) and Travon Baker (No. 5) during an NCAA basketball game in Amherst, Mass., on Dec. 14.
Michael Dwyer AP

5:15pm

Sat April 12, 2014
World

With Crimean Borders In Dispute, Google Maps Has It Both Ways

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 6:44 pm

On Russia's Google Maps service, Crimea is separated from Ukraine by a solid line.
google.ru

In most of the world, the region is included in Russia with a dotted line. Viewed in Russia, the line is solid. Guest host Tess Vigeland speaks with John Gravois about the issues with mapping borders.

5:15pm

Sat April 12, 2014
Sports

What You May Have Missed: The Week's Sports Wrapup

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 6:44 pm

The Masters is well under way and A Martinez from member station KPCC is here to talk golf with guest host Tess Vigeland. Plus, Kentucky coach John Calipari's new book and the future of the NCAA.

5:15pm

Sat April 12, 2014
Technology

Diagnosing And Treating The Internet's Heartbleed Bug

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 6:44 pm

Encryption software meant to protect users online had a giant hole in it. Researchers found the Heartbleed bug Monday but Jordan Robertson from Bloomberg Businessweek tells guest host Tess Vigeland says it's been around for a while.

7:00pm

Fri April 11, 2014
This Week's Must Read

Poisoned Cigars And A Painful Chapter In Our History

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 11:54 am

Courtesy of New Press

The 50th anniversary of the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act is almost upon us, but the celebrations began this week at the Johnson presidential library. A speech by President Obama referenced "doors of opportunity" swung open by the passage of this piece of landmark legislation. But for those of us who remember when the doors were tightly shut, other images come to mind. No, it's not the soft, grainy black-and-white images of well-dressed men and women marching nobly to end the evils of segregation. What we see is churches on fire, smoke and violence.

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4:52pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Deep In The Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas

LBJ Carried Poor Texas Town With Him In Civil Rights Fight

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 1:34 am

Long before he was president, Lyndon Johnson taught in Cotulla, Texas. He is pictured here with students in 1928.
Courtesy of LBJ Library

4:31pm

Fri April 11, 2014
All Tech Considered

Can't Ask That? Some Job Interviewers Go To Social Media Instead

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 1:49 pm

In the hiring process, there are things employers aren't permitted to ask, like whether you plan to have kids. Some employers turn to social media to learn more about job candidates.
iStockphoto

Many of Don Kluemper's management students at the University of Illinois at Chicago have had this experience: After going on a job interview, they sometimes receive "friend" requests from their interviewers.

It puts the students in a bind, he says. They fear that not accepting the request might hurt their job chances, but they also feel compelled to scrub their profiles before accepting.

"They didn't know why they were being friended," Kluemper says. "If it was some personal request or if the person was going to be screening their profile."

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4:03pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Politics and Government

Area politicians want smartphone manufacturers to install technology to prevent thefts

Syracuse Police Chief Frank Fowler, Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner, New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, Rep. Dan Maffei (D-Syracuse), New York State Sen. David Valesky (D-Oneida) at news conference in Syracuse Friday.
Tom Magnarelli/WRVO

Several local politicians, including Rep. Dan Maffei (D-Syracuse) and New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman appeared at city hall in downtown Syracuse to throw their support behind the federal Smartphone Theft Prevention Act.

The act would require smartphone makers to install a “kill switch” on their devices that would allow customers to delete data and deactivate their phone remotely.

Schneiderman says the major manufactures have the technology to do this but are choosing not to.

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4:00pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Remembrances

Jesse Winchester, Musician And Muse To Icons, Dies At 69

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 8:47 pm

Jesse Winchester performs live in The Netherlands in 2011.
Jordi Vidal/Redferns Getty Images

4:00pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Business

GM Recall Distrust Trickles Down To Dealers

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 8:13 pm

The General Motors recall puts its dealerships in an uncomfortable spot, having to placate customers as both parties wait for replacement parts to arrive. Brian Bull of WCPN reports that many are reconsidering whether they'll ever buy a GM car again.

4:00pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Sports

NBA Commish Wades Into Debate Over Paying College Players

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 8:13 pm

New NBA commissioner Adam Silver made news by suggesting the league's willingness to pay college basketball players. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis explains what might mean for professionals and students.

1:18pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Health

Onondaga County: Dr. Morrow's resignation was "premature"

Dr. Cynthia Morrow, former commissioner of the Onondaga County Health Department, speaking to the county legislature's health committee.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Onondaga County's deputy executive for human services says it was "premature" for the county's health commissioner to resign.

Dr. Cynthia Morrow resigned from her role as the county's top health expert last week over the county executive's plans to reorganize child and maternal health services within county departments.

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7:09pm

Thu April 10, 2014
News

Sebelius, Leader Of Rocky Health Care Rollout, Resigns From HHS

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 8:12 pm

Kathleen Sebelius has resigned from her position as secretary of health and human services. President Obama accepted her resignation, and he plans to nominate Sylvia Matthews Burwell to replace her.

5:21pm

Thu April 10, 2014
Book Reviews

After A Disaster In 'Family Life,' Relief Never Comes

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 8:12 pm

iStockphoto

Some things in life are just too painful to accept, and the same is true in novels. Family Life is the story of the Mishras, who immigrate to the U.S. in the late 1970s from India. Their departure is such a big deal that townspeople gather around just to have a look at their airplane tickets. Expectations of the life that awaits them start to build. "Americans clean themselves with paper, not water," says a classmate of the younger Mishra brother, Ajay, who narrates the novel. "In America, they say 'yeah' not yes," the boy goes on. To which Ajay replies, "That's nothing.

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5:04pm

Thu April 10, 2014
Law

For Albuquerque PD, A Searing Rebuke From Justice Department

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 8:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The Justice Department issued a scathing report today on the Albuquerque Police Department's use of force. Albuquerque officers have shot and killed 23 people in the last four years. Many of the victims were mentally or emotionally unstable. The report says the department has systemic deficiencies that caused the deaths and many other incidents. NPR's Ted Robbins has the story.

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