All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the more than four decades since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Kelly McEvers and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Michel Martin.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators.

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Ways to Connect

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Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner is bringing more attention to water and infrastructure issues in the city of Syracuse. The city has partnered with local Café Kubal coffee shops as part of a national, “Imagine a Day Without Water” campaign with the nonprofit U.S. Water Alliance. It is meant to help drum up public support for water issues.  

Miner said Syracuse has an abundance of water it can market to grow the local economy.

“It’s a tremendous economic development resource, places like Café Kubal, distilleries, breweries, commercial laundry; it’s an asset,” Miner said.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Hillary Clinton was back on the campaign trail today. After taking three days to rest from pneumonia, Clinton entered her event with some specially chosen music for the occasion.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I GOT YOU")

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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There was a time when the most frustrating thing about summer road trips were the lines at the toll booth.

Remember digging through the seats for exact change or scrambling to find the shortest line? Toll collection has come a long way, from handing money to cashiers to simply driving through the booth with an E-ZPass.

But the technology passed through many, often surprising, hands — musicians and spies and NASA scientists — to become the electronic toll booths many highways enjoy today.

'Music Out Of Thin Air'

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency worker, is back in the news. On Capitol Hill, a House committee met in secret today. Members approved a new report about how Snowden leaked classified documents from the NSA three years ago.

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Ryan Lawrence, the man accused of kidnapping and murdering his 21-month-old daughter, Maddox Lawrence, has pleaded guilty to first and second-degree murder in Onondaga County Court. As part of a plea deal, Lawrence will be sentenced to life imprisonment with the possibility of parole after 25 years.

Tim Gunn, Emmy-winning co-host of the show Project Runway, says the fashion industry is not making it work for plus-size women.

In an article for The Washington Post, he called it a disgrace.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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PamHelming.com

In the Republican primary for the 54th District state Senate race, Canandaigua Town Supervisor Pam Helming  appeared to be the victor, leading the four other candidates.

Although absentee ballots still need to be counted, Helming was ahead of her closest rival, businessman Floyd Rayburn, by 190 votes.

Longtime state Sen. Mike Nozzolio currently has the position, but is not running for re-election.  However, Helming realizes there is a legacy there.

Since Angel Olsen's first album in 2010, she's carved out a smoky, country-flavored corner of the indie rock world for herself. Her distinctive voice delivers taut meditations on love and loneliness, sometimes with a shout and other times with more of a whisper. Her music earned her critical acclaim, but also a reputation as a tortured soul — one she wasn't really looking for.

First, a confession: I've never liked gefilte fish. The slimy, grey balls of fish from a jar have always struck me as icky.

Turns out, I am not alone.

"I had the same experience as you. I never ate gefilte fish," says Liz Alpern. "It was disgusting to me. I literally think I never ate it, until I started making it."

That's a remarkable statement coming from someone in the gefilte fish business. Alpern is half of the team behind the Gefilteria, which makes artisanal gefilte fish. Yes, that is a thing. Alpern gave me a demonstration at a catering kitchen in Brooklyn.

Just after dawn, on a rutted out dirt road west of Las Vegas, Nev., Bureau of Land Management Ranger Shane Nalen steers his four by four over a small hill.

"You never know what you're going to roll up on out here," he says, his dispatch radio squawking in the background.

A panoramic view of the rugged Nevada desert unfolds. But there's also something peculiar. The desert carpet is lit up with reflecting lights shimmering in the soft morning sun.

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Payne Horning / WRVO News

The Utica Common Council is moving forward with a plan to re-pave every road in the city after they voted last week to override the mayor's veto. The 15-year project will cost $75 million.

Mayor Robert Palmieri opposed the plan because it could require Utica to borrow more than $48 million. He said locking the city into long-term debt is ill advised. Councilman David Testa is also skeptical about the cost, noting that the plan already calls for an annual .74 percent property tax increase. 

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Every so often, you run across a collection that opens up an entirely new way to think about an artist. Jack White's new, 26-track retrospective, which focuses on his unplugged, less raucous songs, does just that. The unreleased songs, album tracks and B-sides that make up Jack White Acoustic Recordings, 1998-2016 offer a fresh window onto the work of the creative, prolific rock musician.

A group of inmates in Texas is suing the state prison system, the nation's largest, arguing that extreme heat is killing older and infirm convicts. The inmates allege it constitutes "cruel and unusual punishment" and they're asking the courts for relief.

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Mike Becallo campaign/Vince Giordano

New York state holds primary elections for state Assembly and Senate races. In central New York, an Assembly seat on the eastern side of Onondaga County is in the spotlight for the GOP.

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