All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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3:11am

Fri January 11, 2013
Health

Some mental health experts worry about gun control proposals

It was no surprise that Gov. Andrew Cuomo's State of the State address focused on the issue of gun control in New York. Following several tragedies in recent months, Cuomo put forward a list of proposed laws to tighten gun control. But one part of the proposal in particular may prove controversial.

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7:02pm

Thu January 10, 2013
Business

To Catch Worker Misconduct, Companies Hire Corporate Detectives

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 8:32 pm

Companies are turning to corporate monitors to check on employees who may be misbehaving.
iStockphoto.com

As businesses face more complex regulations and heightened scrutiny by prosecutors, companies are turning to investigative firms to help keep watch over their employees.

The idea behind the "corporate monitoring" business is to nip misconduct in the bud before law enforcement catches a whiff of it. These corporate detectives-for-hire are seeing good business these days, and finding new ways to snoop.

We all know our employers have access to tons of data about us. They can see every person we email from our company email account, every phone number we dial from our desk.

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5:57pm

Thu January 10, 2013
It's All Politics

For Young Republican, Defying Boehner In Washington Plays Well Back Home

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 6:50 pm

Republican House Speaker John Boehner administers the oath of office to Amash during a mock swearing-in ceremony on Jan. 5, 2011, at the start of Amash's first term.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

When the rumored rebellion against House Speaker John Boehner's bid for a second term played out last week, the very first Republican to not vote for Boehner was Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., just three names into the alphabetical roll call.

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5:52pm

Thu January 10, 2013
Theater

'Adventure Hour' Is A New Take On Old-Time Radio

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 6:26 pm

Mark Gagliardi and Autumn Reeser, as aviator Amelia Earhart, perform in The Thrilling Adventure Hour. Actors dress up and read scripts onstage in front of a live nightclub audience.
Jonathan Reilly The Thrilling Adventure Hour

The creators of The Thrilling Adventure Hour proudly call it "fake radio." It's less an homage to old-time radio and more of a clever update. A live monthly performance at Largo, a 200-seat, scruffy-chic Hollywood nightclub is also available as a popular podcast through Nerdist.

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4:45pm

Thu January 10, 2013
Latin America

Hugo Chavez Misses Inauguration Day, But Supporters Fill The Streets

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 6:26 pm

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez remained in Cuba, where he's receiving treatment for cancer, and was not present for his planned inauguration in Caracas on Thursday. However, thousands of supporters gathered outside the presidential palace to show their backing.
Leo Ramirez AFP/Getty Images

Three Latin American presidents turned up, as did foreign diplomats. And thousands of President Hugo Chavez's supporters flooded the streets Thursday outside the presidential palace in Venezuela's capital, Caracas.

But Chavez himself didn't show — he remained in Cuba, incapacitated after his latest round of cancer surgery.

Still, the carefully choreographed show did go on, and Chavez's aides said he remains in charge.

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4:42pm

Thu January 10, 2013
NPR Story

Argentine Leader's Plane Grounded By Credit Holders

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 6:26 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

When Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner travels to Asia and the Middle East this month, she won't be flying on the official presidential plane. That's because Argentina fears the Boeing 757 jet known as Tango 1 will be seized when it lands by creditors, bond holders who hold sovereign debt that Argentina has defaulted on. So, instead of taking that risk, President Fernandez will be flying on a rented charter plane at the cost of $880,000.

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4:42pm

Thu January 10, 2013
NPR Story

Washington Redskins Fans Blame Coach For Quarterback's Injuries

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 6:26 pm

Audie Cornish talks to sportswriter Stefan Fatsis about news in the National Football League. They cover the injury of Washington Redskins' quarterback Robert Griffin III, new information about brain damage sustained by the late linebacker Junior Seau, and a preview of the weekend's playoff games.

4:28pm

Thu January 10, 2013
It's All Politics

Estimated Costs Drive Debate As Florida Weighs Medicaid Expansion

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 6:26 pm

Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks in Fort Lauderdale in May.
J. Pat Carter AP

Florida and several other states are wrestling with a decision: whether to expand Medicaid.

When the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act last year, the court said states could opt out of that part of the law. But it's key. It would provide coverage to millions of low-income Americans who currently have no health insurance.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott says he's concerned about how much expanding Medicaid would cost. But others charge the governor is exaggerating.

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3:55pm

Thu January 10, 2013
The Upstate Economy

Cuomo says proposed casinos would draw tourists upstate

License Some rights reserved by Håkan Dahlström Creative Commons License

During his State of the State address on Wednesday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo offered more details on a plan for casino gambling in New York state. If the governor gets his way, the proposed new casinos would come to upstate first.

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1:48pm

Thu January 10, 2013
Afghanistan

Small Strike Against Corruption: Afghan Governors Chosen On Merit

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 6:26 pm

Deputy provincial governors and district governors selected under a new merit-based program are sworn in Tuesday in Kabul. The development is part of an effort to address rampant corruption in Afghanistan.
Sean Carberry NPR

Regularly ranked as one of the most corrupt countries in the world, Afghanistan has implemented what for it is a novel new program: selecting provincial and district officials on the basis of their skills, rather than connections.

By all accounts, Afghanistan's corruption is endemic at all levels of government. It's hoped the new effort will begin to curb graft, patronage and nepotism in the country's 34 provinces and roughly 360 districts.

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1:25pm

Thu January 10, 2013
Shots - Health News

Wake-Up Call: FDA Pushes Drugmakers To Weaken Sleeping Pills

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 6:26 pm

Tim Boyle Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration announced Thursday that it was requiring companies that make Ambien and similar sleeping pills to sharply cut the doses of the drugs.

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8:16am

Thu January 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Crazy Or Canny? Talk Grows About $1 Trillion Platinum Coin

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 1:15 pm

No, this isn't worth $1 trillion. It's a commemorative coin minted in the U.K. in 2008. But some have suggested the president's image should be on it if he orders up a $1 trillion coin.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

We're pretty sure this won't happen.

But ...

You practically can't visit a news site these days without seeing a story about why President Obama should or should not order the Treasury Department to strike a platinum coin "worth" $1 trillion and deposit it with the Federal Reserve.

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5:49pm

Wed January 9, 2013
U.S.

Ohio Town Roiling As Rape Case Accusations Fly

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 8:17 pm

Protesters gather at the Jefferson County Courthouse in Steubenville, Ohio, on Saturday, to demand justice for a girl allegedly raped by Steubenville High School football players last August.
Rick Senften WKSU

The small river town of Steubenville, Ohio, is in turmoil over an alleged rape involving high school football players, a 16-year-old girl and accusations of a cover-up.

Steubenville is nestled in the foothills of Appalachia at the juncture of Ohio and West Virginia, less than 10 miles from the Pennsylvania border. To the west, reclaimed strip mines, woods and hills stretch far into rural Ohio. Pittsburgh lies 37 miles to the east.

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5:49pm

Wed January 9, 2013
Shots - Health News

U.S. Ranks Below 16 Other Rich Countries In Health Report

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 6:46 pm

iStockphoto.com

It's no news that the U.S. has lower life expectancy and higher infant mortality than most high-income countries. But a magisterial new report says Americans are actually less healthy across their entire life spans than citizens of 16 other wealthy nations.

And the gap is steadily widening.

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5:11pm

Wed January 9, 2013
Around the Nation

Thanks, But No Thanks: When Post-Disaster Donations Overwhelm

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 6:31 pm

Volunteers sort through piles of donated clothes for Superstorm Sandy victims at an impromptu Staten Island aid station in November. Relief groups are still trying to figure out what to do with donated clothes people sent to New York and New Jersey in Sandy's aftermath.
Seth Wenig AP

Newtown, Conn., was so inundated with teddy bears and other donations after last month's school shootings that it asked people to please stop sending gifts. Relief groups in New York and New Jersey are still trying to figure out what to do with piles of clothes and other items sent there after Superstorm Sandy.

It happens in every disaster: People want to help, but they often donate things that turn out to be more of a burden. Disaster aid groups are trying to figure out a better way to channel these good intentions.

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5:07pm

Wed January 9, 2013
NPR Story

Canada's Indigenous People Rally For Rights Around 'Idle No More' Initiative

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 6:31 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. A grass-roots indigenous movement is shaking up politics in Canada. It's called Idle No More. Like Occupy Wall Street and the Arab Spring, it spread quickly through social media. And it's now got the attention of Canada's leaders, thanks to the efforts of one chief from a tiny tribe whose hunger strike has galvanized the movement. David Sommerstein, of North Country Public Radio, has the story.

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4:31pm

Wed January 9, 2013
Book Reviews

'A Life In Friendships' Is A Life Well Lived

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 6:31 pm

She Matters cover detail

You know how sometimes in life you make a friend, and at first you want to talk to her all the time, feverishly telling her details that, by their very personal nature, will bind you to this other person forever, or so you hope? But inevitably, of course, friendships shift and change and become something different from what they initially seemed.

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4:13pm

Wed January 9, 2013
The Upstate Economy

Computer chip manufacturer to build new R&D facility in Saratoga County

The computer chip manufacturer GlobalFoundries has announced that it will move forward with plans to construct a $2 billion research and development center in Saratoga County.

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4:08pm

Wed January 9, 2013
Politics and Government

State of the State brings initiatives for women's equality, building casinos & more

Governor Cuomo delivering his 2013 State of the State Address in Albany.
governorandrewcuomo Flickr

Upstate New York's struggling economy will get a boost if plans proposed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo in his State of the State speech in Albany Wednesday move ahead.

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3:59pm

Wed January 9, 2013
Middle East

Wary Of Syria's War, Israel Plans A Fence In The Golan Heights

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 9:04 am

An Israeli tank in the Golan Heights overlooks the Syrian village of Bariqa in November. Israel, which captured the Golan Heights from Syria in 1967, says it's building a fence there because it's concerned about spillover from the Syrian war.
Ariel Schalit AP

Concerned about spillover from Syria's civil war, Israel says it will build a fence in the Golan Heights along the line that has effectively served as the border since wars between them in the 1960s and 1970s.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who recently made the announcement, says he's concerned about Syrian rebel groups that have succeeded in capturing areas close to the frontier. He says that building the fence, which would extend for more than 40 miles, is a precaution.

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2:16pm

Wed January 9, 2013
Shots - Health News

Alzheimer's Drug Dials Back Deafness In Mice

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:34 am

If you know some mice that took This Is Spinal Tap too literally, they might want to know about an experiment to restore hearing with a failed Alzheimer's drug.
The Kobal Collection

If you've spent years CRANKING YOUR MUSIC UP TO 11, this item's for you.

A drug developed for Alzheimer's disease can partially reverse hearing loss caused by exposure to extremely loud sounds, an international team reports in the journal Neuron.

Before you go back to rocking the house with your Van Halen collection, though, consider that the drug has only been tried in mice so far. And it has never been approved for human use.

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1:17pm

Wed January 9, 2013
The Two-Way

Colorado Shooting Hearing Ends With Chilling Photos, No Defense Witnesses

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 6:31 pm

James Holmes in a photo from the Arapahoe County (Colo.) Sheriff's Office.
AP

In the weeks before the attack, James Holmes took photos of the Colorado movie theater where 12 people were killed and dozens more wounded in last summer's mass shooting, prosecutors revealed Wednesday at a court hearing in Colorado.

They also introduced photos he took on the night of the midnight massacre, the Denver Post reports:

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6:52pm

Tue January 8, 2013
The Salt

Farm Bill Critics Claim Partial Victory Despite Stalemate

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 10:20 am

Peanut plants grow on a Halifax, N.C., farm that received federal subsidies in 2011.
Robert Willett MCT /Landov

It's amazing how many different kinds of people have been trying to abolish or at least change the government's payments to farmers. They include economists, environmentalists, taxpayer advocates, global anti-hunger advocates and even a lot of farmers. Some have been fighting farm subsidies for the past 20 years.

This past year, those critics laid siege to offices on Capitol Hill because the law that authorizes these programs — the farm bill — was about to expire. (It has to be renewed every five years.)

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6:37pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Environment

Deep In Canadian Lakes, Signs Of Tar Sands Pollution

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 6:43 pm

The Shell Oil Jackpine open pit mine uses trucks that are 3 stories tall, weigh 1 million pounds and cost $7 million each. There is explosive growth in the oil field areas around Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada.
The Washington Post/Getty Images

Canadian researchers have used the mud at the bottom of lakes like a time machine to show that tar sands oil production in Alberta, Canada, is polluting remote regional lakes as far as 50 miles from the operations.

An increasingly large share of U.S. oil comes from Canada's tar sands. There are environmental consequences of this development, but until recently, Canadian regional and federal governments left it to the industry to monitor these effects.

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6:37pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Business

After The 'Fiscal Cliff,' Businesses Say Some Uncertainty Remains

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 7:23 pm

U.S. employers added 155,000 jobs in December, a steady gain that shows hiring held up during the tense negotiations to resolve the fiscal cliff. But the unemployment rate remained at 7.8 percent last month.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Businesses complained that the uncertainty surrounding the "fiscal cliff" froze their decisions about hiring and expanding, which hurt the economy. Washington has now managed half a deal, which settles tax issues, at least for the time being. But has that removed enough uncertainty to boost some business hiring and investment?

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5:25pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Europe

A Dash Of Olive Oil May Preserve British Cathedral

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 6:24 am

The stones of York Minster in northern England are decaying. Olive oil may be just the dressing the cathedral needs to preserve its Gothic architecture.
Nigel Roddis Reuters/Landov

The British have some stunning cathedrals, and York Minster, in the north of England, is one of the most magnificent of all.

Construction on it began 800 years ago, and a mere 2 1/2 centuries later, work was complete.

The result was one of Europe's largest Gothic cathedrals and one that's had a rough ride through history: It's been pillaged and looted, and damaged by devastating fires and lightning strikes.

Today, there's another threat: acid rain. As a result, the cathedral's stones are decaying.

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5:20pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Middle East

A Welcoming Way Station For Syrians Fleeing Home

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 6:37 pm

Beit Qamishlo is a modest house in southern Turkey that caters to Syrian exiles seeking temporary refuge. It also hosts frequent discussions on Syria's future. Here, Malik Dagestani (center), a former political prisoner in Syria, talks about his detention in the 1980s and 1990s.
Kelly McEvers NPR

It's called Beit Qamishlo, or the House of Qamishlo. It's named after a city in northeastern Syria, though the house isn't even in Syria — it's just across the border in southern Turkey.

The house is humble, made of concrete blocks, with tile floors. Arabic slogans are taped on the walls: "Beit Qamishlo is a house for everyone," "It's a window to Syria's future," "Under one roof we plant life together and freedom."

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4:53pm

Tue January 8, 2013
U.S.

Gun Control Advocates Say ATF's Hands Have Been Tied

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 6:37 pm

Officers transfer confiscated weapons after a news conference to announce the arrests of scores of alleged gang members and associates on federal racketeering and drug-trafficking charges in Lakewood, Calif., in 2009.
David McNew Getty Images

After the school shooting in Newtown, Conn., President Obama asked Vice President Biden to lead a group tasked with drafting policies to reduce gun violence. One of the issues sure to come up in the Biden group's discussions is the role of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

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4:41pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Around the Nation

Workshops Help Families Grappling With Alzheimer's Home Care

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 9:24 pm

The nation's largest provider of nonmedical home care for seniors is now offering training to help family caregivers deal with the challenges of caring for an Alzheimer's patient.
iStockphoto.com

There are more than 5 million people with Alzheimer's in the U.S., and most are cared for at home. Now, one company has begun offering training to family caregivers to help them deal with the special challenges of caring for an Alzheimer's patient.

The company, Home Instead Senior Care, is the nation's largest provider of nonmedical home care for seniors. The workshops are free and available to anyone, whether they're clients of the company or not.

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4:32pm

Tue January 8, 2013
NPR Story

2012 Smashes Record For Hottest Year In The Lower 48

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 6:37 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

It's official, federal scientists say 2012 was the hottest year on record for the Lower 48 States. In fact, the average shattered the previous record set in 1998.

Here's NPR science correspondent Richard Harris.

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