All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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6:53pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Law

Supreme Court Questions UT's Affirmative Action Plan

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 7:25 pm

Abigail Fisher, the Texan involved in the University of Texas affirmative action case, talks to reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Wednesday.
Susan Walsh AP

Affirmative action in higher education appeared to take a potentially lethal hit on Wednesday, as the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments testing the constitutionality of a race-conscious admission program at the University of Texas, Austin.

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5:31pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Science

Two Americans Share Nobel Prize In Chemistry

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 6:57 pm

Two Americans have won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Robert Lefkowitz and Brian Koblika were awarded the prize for their work on protein receptors that tell cells what's going on around the human body. Their research has allowed drug makers to develop medication with fewer side effects. The pair with share the $1.2 million award.

5:22pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Romney Causes Yet Another Abortion Stir

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 9:22 am

Mitt Romney's comments on abortion have surprised those on both sides of the issue.
Evan Vucci AP

Just how many abortion positions does Mitt Romney have? Once again, that answer is unclear.

This time the confusion began Tuesday, during a meeting with the editorial board of the Des Moines Register.

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5:22pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Religion

Sisters And Vatican II: A Generational Tug Of War

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 5:37 pm

A nun chants while she and her sisters pray together during Vespers at their home near Dumfries, Va. Unlike older sisters shaped by Vatican II, a new generation of women are flocking to more conservative orders.
Barbara Bradley Hagerty NPR

Fifty years ago, Pope John XXIII launched a revolution in the Catholic Church. The Second Vatican Council opened on Oct. 11, 1962, with the goal of bringing the church into the modern world. Catholics could now hear the Mass in their local language. Laypeople could take leadership roles in the church. And the church opened conversations with other faiths.

For American nuns, Vatican II brought freedoms and controversies that are playing out today.

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4:26pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Technology

Company aims to revolutionize global standards for eye care

A mock up of the digital retinal camera.
Kate O'Connell WXXI

A western New York photonics manufacturing company has received a $973,000 grant from the National Institute of Health. The two year grant awarded to Lumetrics, is for the development of a clinically tested retinal imaging tool prototype.

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4:24pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Music News

An Immigrant's 'Star-Spangled Banner,' En Español

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 6:57 pm

Clotilde Arias (seated) with composer and arranger Terig Tucci, circa 1943.
Courtesy of the Arias family

In 2006, Roger Arias went into his garage searching for a long-lost treasure. He remembered a story about his grandmother and a Spanish translation of "The Star-Spangled Banner."

"I dug through my boxes and sure enough, there was a folder," he says. "It said 'The National Anthem,' and she had version 1 through 10. She kept every one of them."

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4:06pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

During Lockout Season, Orchestra Musicians Grapple With Their Future

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 1:05 pm

The Minnesota Orchestra is one of many orchestras around the country dealing with labor disputes.
Greg Helgeson

It's been a tumultuous time for American orchestras. Labor disputes have shut down the Minnesota Orchestra and Indianapolis Symphony, and strikes and lockouts have affected orchestras in Chicago, Atlanta and Louisville in the past year.

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4:02pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Music News

You, Too, Can Print Your Own Guitar

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 6:57 pm

Industrial engineer Scott Summit made this guitar out of nylon powder.
Courtesy of Scott Summit

Though it's been around for three decades, 3-D printing has finally started to take off for manufacturing and even for regular consumers. It's being used for making airplane parts on demand and letting kids make their own toys. One designer is pushing the limits of 3-D printing by using it to make an acoustic guitar.

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3:16pm

Wed October 10, 2012
The Two-Way

'Human Hamster Wheel' Sinks; Here's Video Of How It Used To Work

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 6:57 pm

The hamster wheel, before she sank.
Facebook.com/IrishSeaCrossing

As our friends at All Things Considered say, "it's been a frustrating week for daredevils."

Felix Baumgartner had to postpone his attempt to rise 23 miles high in the sky and then jump from a balloon to see if he can break the speed of sound on the way down.

And maybe you haven't heard, but Chris Todd had to give on his "walk" across the Irish Sea in a human hamster wheel.

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1:30pm

Wed October 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Sharp Criticism, Some Words In Defense At Hearing On Benghazi Attack

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 6:57 pm

Two very different views from two different witnesses today as the House House Oversight and Government Reform Committee opened its probe into the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, in which ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans were killed.

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10:03am

Wed October 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Spaniards, Who Usually Aid Others, Being Asked To Help Their Own

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 8:17 pm

In June, people in Madrid came to a distribution center where those in need could get food.
Javier Soriano AFP/Getty Images

7:15pm

Tue October 9, 2012
Science

Nobel In Physics: Your Tax Dollars At Work

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 10:45 am

In this combination of photos, American physicist David Wineland (left) speaks at a news conference in Boulder, Colo., and French physicist Serge Haroche speaks to the media in Paris after they were named winners of the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics.
Ed Andrieski, Michel Euler AP

You wouldn't be surprised to learn that a laboratory run by the U.S. Department of Commerce is working on more precise methods to measure stuff.

However, you might not expect it to be at the cutting edge of the mind-bending world of quantum physics. But on Tuesday, David Wineland became the fourth employee at the National Institute for Standards and Technology, a federal lab, to win a Nobel since 1997. Wineland learned he will share the Nobel Prize in physics with Frenchman Serge Haroche for work that's both esoteric and practical.

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6:19pm

Tue October 9, 2012
U.S.

At U. Of Texas, A Melting Pot Not Fully Blended

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Wednesday in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, a case that could determine the future of policies that include race as a factor in university admissions.
Eric Gay AP

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in a landmark case about race and college admissions. In 2008, a white student named Abigail Fisher was denied admission to the University of Texas, Austin.

Fisher sued the university, claiming she was denied admission because of her race. Her suit, Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, could mean the end of admissions policies that take race into account.

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4:53pm

Tue October 9, 2012
Law

Supreme Court To Take Up Affirmative Action Case

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Tomorrow, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in a landmark case about race and college admissions. In 2008, a white student named Abigail Fisher sued the University of Texas in Austin. Ms. Fisher claimed she was denied admission to UT because of her race.

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4:42pm

Tue October 9, 2012
Regional Coverage

Upstate wine industry uses the personal touch

Some Rights Reserved: jwinfred

It’s the staple of just about everything. From dinner parties, to weekend shenanigans, to church, wine is a big part of our lives – and it’s a big part of the economy, too.

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4:40pm

Tue October 9, 2012
Around the Nation

Instead Of Surgery, Man Pedals Off The Pounds

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:02 pm

Ernest Gagnon weighed 570 pounds before he decided to lose weight by taking up cyclocross racing. Forgoing surgery, Gagnon lost more than 200 pounds and recently competed in his first cyclocross race.
Courtesy of Ernest Gagnon

A lot of Americans are struggling to lose a whole lot of weight, and they try all kinds of crazy things.

Ernest Gagnon — a man from Billerica, Mass. — decided to shed pounds by getting into the often intense, high-adrenaline sport of cyclocross: racing road bikes on obstacle courses.

Two years ago, Gagnon tipped the scales at 570 pounds. He was depressed and embarrassed to leave the house.

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4:40pm

Tue October 9, 2012
NPR Story

Sandusky Sentenced To At Least 30 Years In Prison

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky will most likely spend the rest of his life in prison. Sandusky was convicted in June of sexually abusing 10 boys. And today, he was sentenced to at least 30 years in a state correctional facility.

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3:45pm

Tue October 9, 2012
Music Reviews

Shemekia Copeland Embodies The Blues On '33 1/3'

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 3:25 pm

Shemekia Copeland's new album is titled 33 1/3.
Sandrine Lee Courtesy of the artist

Shemekia Copeland says she didn't really find her singing voice until her teen years, when her father, the late blues guitarist Johnny Copeland, began suffering from health issues. On her new album, 33 1/3, she finds a different kind of voice — one that's eager to participate in a national dialogue.

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2:58pm

Tue October 9, 2012
Europe

German Catholics' Path To Heaven Comes With Taxes

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:02 pm

Bavarian bishops walk in a procession to the Basilica of the Fourteen Holy Helpers near Bad Staffelstein, Germany, in May. A decree by the German bishops' conference warns that German Catholics who do not pay a state church tax will be denied sacraments.
Daniel Karmann EPA/Landov

Germany's bishops have a clear message for the country's 25 million Catholics: The road to heaven requires more than faith and good intentions; it requires tax payments, too.

Last month, German bishops warned that if members of the Catholic Church don't pay the country's church tax, they'll be denied the sacraments — including baptisms, weddings and funerals.

In increasingly secular Europe, Germany is one of the few countries where the state collects a special levy from tax-registered believers and hands it over to three organized faiths.

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2:41pm

Tue October 9, 2012
U.S.

Getting To Yes On Gay Marriage, One Voter At A Time

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

Rion Tucker is a canvasser for Equality Maine. The organization is working to get supporters to the polls on Election Day, to vote for a ballot initiative legalizing same-sex marriage.
Michael May for NPR

Rion Tucker is covering a lot of ground in his home state of Maine these days. The 20-year-old is a canvasser for Equality Maine, and he's been knocking on lots of doors in an effort to make sure that voters in his state pass a ballot initiative in November legalizing same-sex marriage.

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9:28am

Tue October 9, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The City As Infestation

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

This nighttime photograph taken from the International Space Station shows much of the Atlantic coast of the United States. Parts of two Russian vehicles parked at the orbital outpost can also be seen in the frame.
NASA

For all their variety and variation, cities are, at their root, physical systems. That means, at some fundamental level, they are also expressions of the laws of physics. In physics size matters (or "scale" as we call it). Physicists learn different things about an object by looking at it from different scales. In our first exploration of physics and cities we stayed at the street level. At that scale we saw cities as machines: cars and elevators, pipes and plumbing. Then we went up to the roof. At that scale we saw cities as engines, vast systems for turning energy into work.

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7:15pm

Mon October 8, 2012
All Tech Considered

Baseball Autographs Get A Digital Upgrade

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:39 am

Sarah Wagner shows off an Egraph of Kerry Wood, her favorite Cubs player.
David Schaper NPR

On her 22nd birthday this summer, Sarah Wagner of suburban Wheaton, Ill., who describes herself as a huge fan of the Chicago Cubs, opened an email to find an incredible surprise — a recorded message from her favorite Cubs player:

"Hey, Sarah! Kerry Wood here! Thanks for your message and I hope you're having a great summer!"

"When I heard for the first time, I instantly smiled," says Wagner. "I think my hands probably went over like my mouth, like, 'Oh my gosh, Kerry Wood is talking to me, even though he has no idea who I am!' "

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5:38pm

Mon October 8, 2012
'Another Thing': Test Your Clever Skills

'Another Thing': Singing The Housework Blues

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 9:38 pm

iStockphoto.com

Each week, All Things Considered and Lenore Skenazy, author of the book and blog Free Range Kids, bring you "Another Thing," an on-air puzzle to test your cleverness skills. We take a trend in the news and challenge you to help us satirize it with a song title, a movie name or something else wacky.

This week's challenge: A study out of Norway found that couples who split the chores equally are 50 percent more likely to divorce.

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5:38pm

Mon October 8, 2012
Presidential Race

Romney Paints Obama As 'Weak Leader' In Middle East

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 8:28 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. Later this month, President Obama and Mitt Romney will meet for a debate focused exclusively on foreign policy, but the Republican is not waiting until then to confront the issue. Today, in a speech at the Virginia Military Institute, Romney attacked the Obama administration's policies, especially in the Middle East.

MITT ROMNEY: It's clear that the risk of conflict in the region is higher now than when the president took office.

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4:41pm

Mon October 8, 2012
Africa

Uganda's Leader: 26 Years In Power, No Plans To Quit

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 3:19 am

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni, who has ruled since 1986, speaks in January at Uganda's Makarere University in the capital Kampala. Uganda celebrates a half-century of independence next month, and Museveni has ruled for more than half of that time.
Ronald Kabuubi AFP/Getty Images

Rebel leader Joesphy Kony, head of the infamous Lord's Resistance Army, has achieved greater notoriety than any other Ugandan in the world today.

Idi Amin, who ruled the country through most of the 1970s, still stands as a symbol of African dictators who abused power and inflicted gross human rights abuses.

Yet as Uganda celebrated 50 years of independence on Tuesday, the man who has most shaped the country is far less known, at least in the West.

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4:41pm

Mon October 8, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney's Debate Performance Swings Polls In His Favor

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 10:10 pm

Mitt Romney and President Obama wave to the audience during the first presidential debate at the University of Denver, on Wednesday.
David Goldman AP

In the five days since Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney was declared by many the winner of the first presidential debate, political watchers have waited to see if polls would shift in response to his performance. And, they did.

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4:41pm

Mon October 8, 2012
Around the Nation

In Pumpkin Regatta, It's Toothy Grins All Around

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 8:37 pm

Peter Geiger lines up before the start of the pumpkin race in Damariscotta, Maine.
Patty Wight Maine Public Radio

The typical jack-o'-lanterns that don front stoops this time of year pale in comparison to their multihundred-pound brethren: the giant pumpkin. Every year in Damariscotta, Maine, people hollow them out, climb inside and race them in the annual pumpkin regatta. There are two divisions — paddleboat and powerboat — and thousands gather to see whether it will be sink or swim for the contestants.

Topher Mallory bolts a wooden frame onto the flesh of his 550-pound pumpkin powerboat. The stern is large enough to mount a 10 horsepower engine — double that of most competitors.

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4:16pm

Mon October 8, 2012
The Upstate Economy

Mobile reemployment teams tour state

Upstate New York is having a hard time getting over the recession. Unemployment in upstate rose to 8.5 percent in August, close to one percentage point higher than during August 2011, according to a new report from the New York State Department of Labor. New York’s rate peaked above the national trend, and this month Governor Andrew Cuomo started an initiative to help address the issue.

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7:43pm

Sun October 7, 2012
Music Interviews

Anat Cohen Bends The Spectrum On 'Claroscuro'

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 10:57 am

Anat Cohen's new album, her sixth as a bandleader, is called Claroscuro.
Jimmy Katz

Born in Tel Aviv, Anat Cohen came to New York two decades ago to study the masters of jazz. In so doing, the clarinetist and saxophonist started a bit of a stampede: Today, Israel is exporting some of the most vital jazz out there.

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7:39pm

Sun October 7, 2012
Presidential Race

Presidential Politics: Does Likeability Matter?

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:32 am

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign event in St. Petersburg, Fla. Slate Magazine's John Dickerson says likeability doesn't matter as much in a presidential campaign as you might think.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

William Lowndes was a congressman from South Carolina who served in the early part of the 19th century. He was once asked to describe who should serve as chief executive.

"The presidency is not an office to be either solicited or declined," he said.

In 1876, Rutherford B. Hayes didn't even vote for himself. He saw it as unseemly. And in 1916, Woodrow Wilson called campaigning "a great interruption to the rational consideration of public questions."

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