All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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6:13pm

Sun November 4, 2012
Three-Minute Fiction

Three-Minute Fiction: The Round 9 Winner Is...

iStockphoto.com

We made it. After six weeks and nearly 4,000 stories, we've reached the end of Round 9 of our Three-Minute Fiction contest, where we ask listeners to come up with an original short story that can be read in about three minutes.

Graduate students from around the country helped read all the submissions. The winning story was chosen by this round's judge, novelist Brad Meltzer. Meltzer wrote the best-selling books The Inner Circle and The Book of Lies. His new book, due out in January, is called The Fifth Assassin.

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4:13pm

Sun November 4, 2012
Music Interviews

It's Gibberish, But Italian Pop Song Still Means Something

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 10:49 am

Cover art from the "Prisencolinensinainciusol" single, released in 1972. The song by Italian pop star Adriano Celentano became a hit in spite of its gibberish lyrics.
Album cover

In November 1972, Italian pop star Adriano Celentano released a song that hit No. 1 in his home country, despite the fact it wasn't performed in Italian.

It also wasn't performed in English.

In fact, it wasn't performed in any language at all.

The song, called "Prisencolinensinainciusol," was written to mimic the way English sounds to non-English speakers.

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4:00pm

Sun November 4, 2012
Election 2012

Gay Marriage, Marijuana And Taxes: States Decide

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 10:42 am

Melissa Fults, treasurer for Arkansans for Compassionate Care, holds up cards at the back of a news conference in Little Rock, Ark., with the names of doctors she says support a ballot issue that would legalize medical marijuana.
Danny Johnston AP

Voters will decide 174 ballot propositions across 37 states this election. Reid Wilson, the editor in chief of National Journal's Hotline, says he believes these decisions will change the day-to-day lives of average Americans more than who wins the presidency.

He spoke to Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered, about some key initiatives across the country.


Interview Highlights

On same-sex marriage

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3:28pm

Sun November 4, 2012
It's All Politics

The Last Pew Poll: Obama Holds Edge On Eve Of Election

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 12:24 pm

The final poll released Sunday by the Pew Research Center ahead of Tuesday's election shows President Obama has a 3 percentage point lead over Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney just two days before the general election.

Obama leads Romney 48 percent to 45 percent in the poll of 2,709 likely voters, which has a margin of error of 2.2 percentage points. The poll was conducted Oct. 31-Nov. 3.

Here's more from the Pew news release:

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5:03pm

Sat November 3, 2012
Movies I've Seen A Million Times

The Movie RZA Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Originally published on Sat November 3, 2012 5:36 pm

Clint Eastwood in a scene from Sergio Leone's film The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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5:00pm

Sat November 3, 2012
Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond

Crews Work To Restore Power, And Explain The Delay

Originally published on Sat November 3, 2012 6:45 pm

Utility crews work on power lines as dusk falls in Ship Bottom, a community on Long Beach Island, N.J.
Patrick Semansky AP

More than 8 million people lost power after Superstorm Sandy. Five days later, 2.5 million are still waiting as power companies across the region continue to say that restoring power is more complicated than it seems.

The storm packed a one-two punch. First, it flooded several switching stations including one hidden under the New Jersey Turnpike in Newark, says Art Torticelli, who was out with his crew from Public Service Electric and Gas at a switching station in Essex, N.J.

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4:40pm

Sat November 3, 2012
Election 2012

'For Whom Will You Vote?' May Be Wrong Question

Originally published on Sat November 3, 2012 6:53 pm

If you want to predict a candidate's fate, there may be a better question to ask than whom voters cast a ballot for.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

In the vast majority of pre-election polls, likely voters are usually asked, "If the election were held today, for whom would you vote?"

That's the wrong question to ask, says Justin Wolfers, a political economist with the University of Michigan. He's spent years researching polls, and in a new paper he offers what he says is the right question:

Who do you think will win?

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8:01pm

Fri November 2, 2012
Music Interviews

Taylor Swift: 'My Confidence Is Easy To Shake'

Originally published on Sat November 3, 2012 5:36 pm

Taylor Swift's fourth studio album, Red, sold 1.2 million copies in its first week — the highest first-week sales total in a decade.
Courtesy of the artist

7:43pm

Fri November 2, 2012
Around the Nation

New York City Marathon Cancelled As Lights Come Back

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

In New York City, the lights are coming back on and the race has been called off. For details, I'm joined now by NPR's Joel Rose in New York. And, Joel, tell us first of all, where has the electricity been restored?

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7:41pm

Fri November 2, 2012
Around the Nation

In New York, Lights Are Back On But The Race Is Off

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

In New York City, the lights are coming back on and the race has been called off. For details, I'm joined now by NPR's Margot Adler in New York. And, Margot, first, where has the electricity been restored?

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5:38pm

Fri November 2, 2012
Around the Nation

After The Storm, Staten Islanders Share The Misery

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 1:35 pm

Steve Santo stands in the kitchen of his house on the south side of the New York City borough of Staten Island on Friday.
Mike Segar Reuters/Landov

Much of the worst damage from Superstorm Sandy happened in New York's less touristy outer boroughs.

Some neighborhoods have been changed forever by the storm. Staten Island saw half of the city's fatalities. On Friday, residents sorted through waterlogged belongings and tried to figure out next steps.

Rosemarie Caruso lives a block from the water on the eastern shore of Staten Island. She says there have been hurricanes before and all they brought was a little flooding. She figured she could ride out Sandy.

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5:32pm

Fri November 2, 2012
Politics

DeFrancisco keeps a watchful eye on state Senate elections

State Sen. John DeFrancisco in his Syracuse office.
Durrie Lawrence WRVO

With two Republican state senators retiring, the GOP could lose their slim majority in the New York State Senate on Tuesday. Senator John DeFrancisco (R-Syracuse) said he doesn’t want Democrats to lead the state Senate, as they did briefly in 2009 and 2010. 

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5:21pm

Fri November 2, 2012
Regional Coverage

Comptroller: Hurricane Sandy could cost state $18 billion

The State Comptroller estimates that Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath will cost the state as much as $18 billion.

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5:15pm

Fri November 2, 2012
Regional Coverage

Cuomo takes steps to ease gas shortage

Governor Cuomo has announced several steps to speed up rebuilding in storm ravaged areas of New York, and to ease what’s been a growing gasoline shortage.

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4:48pm

Fri November 2, 2012
Your Money

Storm Leaves Many Facing Tricky Insurance Process

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 5:34 pm

A tree service worker prepares to remove a giant oak tree limb that fell onto the roof of Charles Edamala's home in Elkins Park, Pa., during Superstorm Sandy.
Emma Jacobs for NPR

Mario Veas spent Monday night hunkered down with his family. But he has been running ever since.

Veas runs a tree service in Willow Grove, Pa. He says his phone has been ringing nonstop because people want trees felled by the storm chopped up and cleared.

"Everybody [is] calling and they want [the job] to be done this morning," Veas says.

Earlier this week, Veas was clearing an enormous tree branch from Preethy Edamala's patio in nearby Elkins Park.

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4:20pm

Fri November 2, 2012
It's All Politics

What If There's No Winner? Presidential Campaigns And Their Lawyers Prepare

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 5:46 pm

People cast their ballots at an early-voting center in Columbus, Ohio, on Oct. 15.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

The presidential race is expected to be extremely close, and that has a lot of people nervous about what it will mean for election night.

Does it mean that the vote count could drag on for days, or even weeks, as it did in 2000?

Lawyers for the campaigns, the political parties and state election offices are preparing for the possibility.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted could very well be the man in the middle of any election night storm. By all accounts, the vote in his crucial battleground state will be extremely close.

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3:16pm

Fri November 2, 2012
NPR's Backseat Book Club

How 'Black Beauty' Changed The Way We See Horses

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:45 pm

NPR's Backseat Book Club is back! And we begin this round of reading adventures with a cherished classic: Black Beauty by Anna Sewell. Generations of children and adults have loved this book. With vivid detail and simple, yet lyrical prose, Black Beauty describes both the cruelty and kindness that an ebony-colored horse experiences through his lifetime — from the open pastures in the English countryside to the cobblestone grit of 19th-century England.

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11:09am

Fri November 2, 2012
China: Change Or Crisis

China's Assertive Behavior Makes Neighbors Wary

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 10:20 pm

China is currently involved in several disputes with its neighbors over small islands, many of them uninhabited. Here, Chinese fishing boats sail off the island province of Hainan in the South China Sea in July.
AP

As China's global stature grows, Beijing appears to be flexing its muscles more frequently on the international stage. As part of NPR's series on China this week, correspondents Louisa Lim and Frank Langfitt are looking at this evolving foreign policy. From Beijing, Louisa examines the forces driving China's policy, while Frank reports on why China's neighbors are feeling increasingly edgy.

By Louisa Lim

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6:42pm

Thu November 1, 2012
It's All Politics

In Key Senate Races, Outside Groups Outpace Candidates' Ad Spending

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 7:52 pm

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (right), D-Ohio, debates his Republican challenger, Ohio state Treasurer Josh Mandel, at the City Club in Cleveland on Oct. 15.
Tony Dejak AP

Most of the attention heading into Election Day may be on the presidential race, but the stakes are also high in the battle for the U.S. Senate, where there are close contests in about a dozen states.

According to an NPR analysis of Kantar Media CMAG data, outside groups are spending more than $100 million blanketing the airwaves. This won't come as a surprise if you live in a state with a competitive Senate race.

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5:15pm

Thu November 1, 2012
Around the Nation

New Yorkers Struggle With Limited Transit Options

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

New Yorkers were ready to get back to work today. Unfortunately, the region's transportation system was not. Commuters to Manhattan overwhelmed the barely operating bus and train system. From Brooklyn, NPR's Robert Smith reports on the resulting long lines and frustration.

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4:39pm

Thu November 1, 2012
Around the Nation

In Flooded New Jersey, No Oversight For Levees

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:42 pm

An emergency responder helps residents of Little Ferry, N.J., after their neighborhood was flooded due to Superstorm Sandy.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Residents of Moonachie and Little Ferry, N.J., are beginning to clear the damage after their communities were inundated by floodwaters. The flooding occurred when a system of levees and berms was unable to control the storm surge pushed ashore by Superstorm Sandy.

Geologist Jeffrey Mount of the University of California, Davis, isn't surprised. "There really are only two kinds of levees," he says, "those that have failed, and those that will fail."

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4:38pm

Thu November 1, 2012
Africa

Vigilantes Spray-Paint Sexual Harassers In Cairo

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 9:15 pm

A young Egyptian man grabs a woman crossing the street with her friends in Cairo. Vigilante groups are now taking to the streets and spray-painting the clothes of the harassers.
Ahmed Abdelatif AP

Over the recent four-day Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, more than 1,000 sexual harassment complaints were filed in Egypt.

President Mohammed Morsi has ordered an investigation, but some are not prepared to wait for the government and the police to act.

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4:32pm

Thu November 1, 2012
The Salt

Tuna Noodle Casserole, A Hot Dish In Need Of An Update, Gets One

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 7:19 pm

Classic tuna noodle casserole is an often maligned yet much beloved hot dish.
iStockphoto.com

Desperation, laziness, overwhelming craving: I say these are three conditions that drive a person to make a tuna noodle casserole.

The desperation? A cupboard bare except for those nonperishable standards: pasta, a can of tuna and a can of cream of mushroom soup. Our friends along the Northeast Seaboard probably know what we're talking about right now.

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4:15pm

Thu November 1, 2012
Politics

Poll shows Doheny-Owens race in statistical tie

Amanda Morrison Watertown Daily Times

The two candidates running for the North Country's congressional seat are in a statistical tie, according to the latest poll from Siena College. Republican Matt Doheny trailed incumbent Democrat Bill Owens by 13 points in Siena's last poll seven weeks ago. Owens now leads by just one point in the poll released today, which showed the Democrat receiving 44 percent support, to Doheny's 43 percent.

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11:23am

Thu November 1, 2012
China: Change Or Crisis

For Complainers, A Stint In China's 'Black Jails'

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 8:25 pm

A man walks through a former unofficial, or "black," jail in Beijing, in 2009. It's estimated that thousands of Chinese lodging protests against the government are illegally detained in secret sites such as this one, even though the government says they don't exist.
Elizabeth Dalziel AP

People often say China is a nation of contrasts: of wealth and poverty, of personal freedom and political limits. But that observation doesn't begin to capture the tensions and incongruities of modern life here.

For instance, in today's Shanghai, you can sip a $31 champagne cocktail in a sleek rooftop bar overlooking the city's spectacular skyline, while, just a few miles away, ordinary citizens languish in a secret detention center run by government-paid thugs.

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6:53pm

Wed October 31, 2012
U.S.

Obama Wades Through New Jersey's Recovery

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

The most populous city in the country is drying out, and beginning a long and complicated recovery. One positive sign: Tomorrow, some New York City subway routes are scheduled to reopen. But today, gridlock ruled as people took to their cars. And that means it's carpool time.

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5:54pm

Wed October 31, 2012
Law

Drug-Sniffing Dogs Take Center Stage At High Court

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 6:53 pm

Miami-Dade Detective Douglas Bartelt and narcotics detector canine Franky give a demonstration in Miami in 2011.
Alan Diaz AP

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in two cases Wednesday testing what, if any, limits there are to the police using drug-sniffing dogs. By the close of two hours of argument, it looked very much as though the court would rule against the use of drug-sniffing dogs without a warrant in one case, but not the other.

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5:53pm

Wed October 31, 2012
Success Factors: Rich, Poor And Everybody Else

At The Economy's Bottom Rungs, Striving To Climb Up

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 6:53 pm

Johnita Ellerby, a single mother of four, is studying social work while working full time.
Art Silverman NPR

As the presidential campaign has unfolded, the candidates have traded polemics about wealth, class warfare, taxes, dependency and the role of government.

While it may be uncomfortable to admit, some Americans are simply more financially successful than others. But why do some achieve wealth, while others struggle? Why does one woman make it to the executive suite, while another man drives a taxi? And what do we think explains our prosperity — or lack thereof?

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5:38pm

Wed October 31, 2012
It's All Politics

Mysterious Anti-Obama Spam Texts Linked To Republican Consulting Group

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 6:53 pm

A screenshot of an anti-Obama text message received Tuesday evening.
NPR

If you're using social media to follow the presidential campaign or even if you're related to someone else who's doing that, there's a good chance your cellphone got spammed Tuesday night with an anti-Obama text message.

The messages went out between 7:30 and 10 p.m. They were anonymous but quickly traced to a Republican consulting firm in Northern Virginia.

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5:34pm

Wed October 31, 2012
Science

High-Def Storm Models Yielded Accurate Predictions

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 6:53 pm

These computer models from Oct. 26 of then-Hurricane Sandy show different predictions for the storm's path.
NOAA

Better satellites, smarter computer models and faster computers helped government forecasters correctly predict the devastation from Hurricane Sandy, scientists say.

It's unlikely the forecast would have been nearly as accurate just a couple of decades ago, they say.

"The National Hurricane Center did a fantastic job, particularly with the track forecast and the intensity forecast as it was moving toward the Northeast," says Sharan Majumdar, an associate professor of meteorology and physical oceanography at the University of Miami.

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