All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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5:18pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Presidential Race

Romney Blurs Campaigning Line At Ohio Event

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Mitt Romney did not officially campaign today out of respect for those recovering from Sandy or still enduring the giant storm, but he did appear in a crucial swing state before thousands of cheering supporters.

NPR's Ari Shapiro reports on Romney's balancing act one week before the election.

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5:17pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Around the Nation

Sandy Leaves A Mess In Lower Manhattan

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 4:47 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In lower Manhattan, the New York Stock Exchange was closed yesterday. It's closed again today; slated to reopen tomorrow. More on that, coming up. But Wall Street is not the only industry in lower Manhattan facing trouble from the hurricane. Zoe Chace, of NPR's Planet Money team, has been getting a look around.

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5:17pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Election 2012

Large Power Outages Raise Concerns For Election Day

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Looming over the recovery from Super Storm Sandy is what to do about next Tuesday's election? The prospect that some voters could still be displaced or without power a week from today has election officials trying to come up with alternative plans.

It even has some people talking about the highly unusual step of delaying the vote, as NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

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5:17pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Around the Nation

Why Does The Stock Exchange Need A Trading Floor?

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 4:47 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Two straight days makes this the worst weather-related closure of the New York Stock Exchange since 1888. There was a monstrous snowstorm in March of that year, drifts of over 40 feet. You know what was also happening right about the same time? The American Arithmometer Company started up in St. Louis. It went on to sell the device that its founding Vice President William Seward Burroughs invented - the adding machine, which raises this question for me.

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5:16pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Around the Nation

Rising Waters Leave Some Trapped in Moonachie, N.J.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Hurricane Sandy made landfall in southern New Jersey and left a path of destruction all the way up the state. Just across the river from New York in Bergen County, water flowed over the top of a levee along the Hackensack River, and then it poured into the town of Moonachie.

NPR's Jim Zarroli went there today.

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5:16pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Around the Nation

Losses From Sandy Could Reach $50 Billion

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Homeowners, businesses, and insurance companies are still assessing the damage from the storm in much of the eastern U.S. But some early estimates are in.

And as NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports, Hurricane Sandy inflicted heavy economic damage.

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5:15pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Around the Nation

Sandy Continues To Disrupt Lives As It Heads West

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Sandy has spoken. Over the past 24 hours, the storm has swamped vast sections of the Jersey shore, crippled much of New York City and left more than 8 million Americans in the dark.

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5:07pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Success Factors: Rich, Poor And Everybody Else

Paid In America: The Road To The Middle

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:07 pm

Sarah Bidgood is managing editor of the Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography. She says her parents helped her start adult life with no debt, giving her a leg up.
Art Silverman NPR

As the presidential campaign has unfolded, the candidates have traded polemics about wealth, class warfare, taxes, dependency and the role of government.

And while it may be uncomfortable to admit, some Americans are simply more financially successful than others. But why do some achieve wealth, while others struggle? Why does one woman make it to the executive suite, while another man drives a taxi? And what do we think explains our prosperity β€” or lack thereof?

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5:07pm

Tue October 30, 2012
It's All Politics

Re-Election Campaign Reveals A President Looking For The Right Balance

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 5:26 pm

President Obama's performance in the first presidential debate cost him a lot.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

As this long election comes to end, Superstorm Sandy is offering a chance for President Obama to showcase his leadership skills one last time.

For Obama, this campaign has truly been a fight against the elements: a painfully slow economic recovery and a political landscape in which the Republicans swept the table just two years ago. The Obama campaign, with its trademark discipline and meticulous organization, set out to overcome these obstacles.

But the long campaign has also put the spotlight on features of Obama's own personality and performance.

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2:03pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Weather

Cuomo says to expect "long term" recovery after Sandy

Governor Andrew Cuomo accesses water levels in Path Train Station at World Trade Center site and Brooklyn Battery Tunnel yesterday.
Gov. Andrew Cuomo Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo, told reporters he spent a β€œfrightening” night monitoring storm devastation in lower Manhattan at a briefing addressing short term repair efforts and long term weather concerns.

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2:03pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Music Reviews

Neil Young Still Vital On 'Psychedelic Pill'

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 12:51 pm

Crazy Horse doesn't just redeem Neil Young's mawkish moments β€” it transforms them. From left, Ralph Molina, Poncho Sampedro, Neil Young and Billy Talbot are Neil Young and Crazy Horse.
Julie Gardner Courtesy of the artist

12:36pm

Tue October 30, 2012
China: Change Or Crisis

In China, A Ceaseless Quest To Silence Dissent

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:06 pm

A bloodied woman is helped by demonstrators after clashes with police in a protest against an industrial waste pipeline in Qidong, Jiangsu province, on July 28. The Chinese government devotes enormous resources to suppressing dissent, but opposition to government policies is increasingly common.
Carlos Barria Reuters/Landov

China is about to get new leaders for the first time in a decade, and it comes at a crucial moment for the world's most populous nation. Economic growth, which surged for decades, has slowed. Demands for political reform have increased and the Communist Party has been hit by scandal. In a series of stories this week, NPR is examining the multiple challenges facing China. In this story, Louisa Lim looks at China's pervasive efforts to maintain order.

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9:39pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Parts Of Manhattan Go Dark As Sandy Rolls Through

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 9:40 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The storm on the East Coast is making a devastating impression on New York City. Storm surge coupled with a high tide have swelled the water to record levels in some places that includes Battery Park, and now, reports of flooding in the subway and in automotive tunnels.

NPR's Margot Adler joins us from New York with more details. And, Margot, what can you tell us about these reports of flooding?

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8:35pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Sandy Makes Landfall Near Atlantic City

Robert Siegel talks with Associated Press correspondent Katie Zezima, who was in Atlantic City, N.J., close to where Sandy made landfall.

7:55pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Millions Without Power As Sandy Makes Landfall

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Already more than a million people from Maine to Virginia have lost electricity because of the storm. And in one case, as we heard a few minutes ago, the utility Consolidated Edison took the unusual step of cutting off power to parts of lower Manhattan. By the time the storm is over, more than 10 million homes and businesses in the eastern U.S. could lose electricity. That's according to the utility industry.

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4:38pm

Mon October 29, 2012
It's All Politics

Pew Poll: Race Evens Up, But Romney Holds Turnout Advantage

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 6:02 pm

Mitt Romney speaks Monday at a campaign event at Avon Lake High School in Avon Lake, Ohio.
Tony Dejak AP

A poll released Monday by the Pew Research Center shows that President Obama has failed to regain much of the support he lost in the days after the first presidential debate.

The poll shows that among likely voters, the race is now a statistical dead heat with both Obama and Mitt Romney receiving 47 percent support. Among registered voters there is what Pew calls a "statistically insignificant two-point edge" of 47 percent to 45 percent for Obama.

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4:38pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Around the Nation

Want To Be Rich? Be Lucky, Know The Right People

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:42 am

Michael and Amy Tiemann estimate their personal wealth at about $25 million β€” and say luck played no small part in their financial success.
Art Silverman NPR

As the presidential campaign has unfolded, the candidates have traded polemics about wealth, class warfare, dependency and the role of government.

And while it may be uncomfortable to admit, some Americans are simply more financially successful than others. But why do some achieve wealth, while others struggle? And what do we think explains our prosperity β€” or lack thereof?

Read more

4:24pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Law

Despite Hurricane, Justices Hear Surveillance Case

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 6:22 pm

The rest of the government may have been shut down for the hurricane, but not the U.S. Supreme Court.

The justices were in court Monday to consider a challenge to the 2008 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, known as FISA. The new law broadly expanded the government's ability to conduct large-scale monitoring of international phone calls and emails to and from people in the United States.

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12:01pm

Mon October 29, 2012
The Two-Way

The Science Of Why Sandy Is Such A Dangerous Storm

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 11:33 am

A Dare County utility worker checks on conditions along a flooded Ride Lane in Kitty Hawk, N.C., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012.
Gerry Broome AP

Here are a few reasons government forecasters at the National Hurricane Center and emergency management officials are so concerned about Sandy:

1. Sandy is one of the largest hurricanes ever to strike the U.S. Sandy's winds cover an area of more than 1,000 miles in diameter. That's enormous by hurricane standards. So instead of affecting an area a couple of hundred miles across, Sandy will cut a huge swath. That means many millions of people are probably going to be exposed to high winds, heavy rains, and, for those on the coast, powerful storm surge.

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11:24am

Mon October 29, 2012
China: Change Or Crisis

China's New Leaders Inherit Country At A Crossroads

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 10:53 am

"The Defense of Yan'an" re-enacts a 1947 battle to protect Mao Zedong's Communist stronghold during the Chinese Civil War from the Nationalists, who fled to Taiwan.
Louisa Lim NPR

China is about to get new leaders for the first time in a decade, and it comes at a sensitive moment for the world's most populous nation. Economic growth, which surged for decades, has slowed. Demands for political reform have increased and the Communist Party has been hit by scandal. In a series of stories this week, NPR is examining the multiple challenges facing China. In our first story, Louisa Lim looks at how the Chinese view the Communist Party in the place where it took shape.

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6:33pm

Sun October 28, 2012
NPR Story

Three-Minute Fiction: 'Speechless,' 'Harding'

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

You know what the ticking means. It's time for Three-Minute Fiction, our contest where we ask you for original stories that can be read in about three minutes. Our judge in this round, the thriller writer Brad Meltzer, the challenge: to write a story that revolves around a U.S. president who could be fictional or real. And, of course, the story had to be 600 words or less. We received nearly 4,000 entries, and here are two that stood out.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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5:03pm

Sun October 28, 2012
Author Interviews

Stories Of The Power of Language, 'Found In Translation'

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 10:41 am

iStockphoto.com

Translation is everywhere β€” that's is the crux of a new book by Nataly Kelly and Jost Zetzsche: Found in Translation: How Language Shapes Our Lives and Transforms our World.

From NASA to the U.N. to Chinese tattoo parlors, the book looks high and low for stories of the undeniable importance of language. One of those stories centers on a man named Peter Less, 91, an inspiration of sorts to interpreters and translators everywhere.

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5:03pm

Sun October 28, 2012
NPR Story

Getting Out The Vote: The Last-Minute Political Push

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 6:33 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden, in for Guy Raz.

NPR is keeping an eye on the progress of Hurricane Sandy as it heads up the East Coast. We'll update you on that in a moment. The weather is now officially dominating the headlines but not entirely. We do have an election on November 6th.

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3:26pm

Sun October 28, 2012
Science

Millennia Of Stargazing At 'African Cosmos' Exhibit

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 6:33 pm

Untitled, by South African artist Gavin Jantjes, is one of the works in the "African Cosmos" exhibition.
National Museum of African Art

3:18pm

Sun October 28, 2012
Commentary

Around The River Bend, A Flood Of History

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 7:41 pm

The Ho-Chunk Indians still consider the river to be sacred, and it's easy to feel that calm, floating along the Bark.
Liam O'Leary

The Bark River is my backyard, childhood river. And yet, in a lifetime of travel, I'd never explored it.

I knew it carved the land from the Ice Age to settlement times, from the Black Hawk War of 1832 (in which young Abraham Lincoln appears) to the era of grist mills. But the Bark also flows past impressive Indian mounds. It nurtured poets, naturalists and farmers.

When former Marquette University professor Milton Bates published his Bark River Chronicles through the Wisconsin State Historical Society, I jumped at the chance to learn about the river with him.

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6:51pm

Sat October 27, 2012
Economy

Bust To Boom: Why Housing Matters, Economically

Originally published on Sat October 27, 2012 7:45 pm

A construction worker finishes a roof in Chicago on Oct. 12. Signs of recovery in the housing market are springing up nationwide, but there's still a ways to go.
Nam Y. Huh AP

The economy has peppered political speeches for much of the presidential campaign. But talk of creating jobs has stolen thunder from the housing market.

The epic housing collapse four years ago was a key ingredient in creating the Great Recession in the first place. Plus, boosting the housing market can be a boon for overall economic recovery.

Beginning A 'Long-Term Cycle'

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6:20pm

Sat October 27, 2012
Music Interviews

Beth Orton: 'These Songs Are My Little Bit Of Sugar'

Originally published on Sat October 27, 2012 7:45 pm

Beth Orton's latest album is called Sugaring Season.
Jo Metson Scott Courtesy of the artist

In the late 1990s, Beth Orton set the music world buzzing with her singular sound: part folk, part electronica. But six years ago, she found herself at a life-changing juncture: pregnant with her first child β€” and dropped from her record label.

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5:17pm

Sat October 27, 2012
Movie Interviews

'Lemon': From Rikers To N.Y.'s Famous Public Theater

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 12:24 pm

Cinema Libre

His story begins a decade ago in Brooklyn, where he grew up fighting in New York's public housing before discovering another kind of power. After three felony convictions and time served at Rikers Island, Lemon Andersen didn't have many places to turn except to his words. Now he's a Tony Award winner with a rave-reviewed one-man show called County of Kings.

He spoke with weekends on All Things Considered guest host Jacki Lyden about his life and the new independent documentary film about it, called simply, Lemon.

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4:54pm

Sat October 27, 2012
NPR Story

Candidates Sprint To Election In Tight Contest

Originally published on Sat October 27, 2012 7:45 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: I'm asking for your vote, and I'm asking you to vote early.

MITT ROMNEY: It matters. This race matters. You know how big this race is.

LYDEN: The candidates making their last swings through the swing states a week and a half before Election Day. James Fallows of The Atlantic joins us as he does most Saturdays. Hello there, Jim.

JAMES FALLOWS: Hello, Jacki.

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4:28pm

Sat October 27, 2012
The Salt

For The Love Of Cheese, Diners Unite In Italy

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 9:46 am

An inspector checks a wheel of Reggiano cheese at the Parmigiano-Reggiano storehouse in Bibbiano, Italy. Earthquakes rocked the region, sending the cheese toppling.
Marco Vasini AP

In Italy tonight, everyone's having the same thing for dinner, and there's no doubt that it's going to smell terrific.

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