All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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5:14pm

Thu August 30, 2012
The Salt

On the Farmers Market Frontier, It's Not Just About Profit

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 10:30 am

On a corner in Washington, D.C., where stores burned during riots 44 years ago, there's now a plaza where farmers sell produce on Saturday mornings.
Dan Charles/NPR

Farmers markets are popping up in cities all across the country, and people expect lots of different things from them: Better food, of course, but also economic development and even friendlier neighborhoods.

At its core, though, the farmers market is a business, and it won't survive unless the farmer makes money.

So what's the key to success for these markets?

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4:45pm

Thu August 30, 2012
Middle East

Egyptian Leader Stirs Tensions On First Visit To Iran

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 6:09 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi caused a diplomatic stir today in Tehran, opening a summit of the Non-Aligned Movement. Morsi denounced the Syrian regime, calling it oppressive and illegitimate. That prompted an angry walk-out by the Syrian delegation. And Morsi's comments cannot have pleased the summit's hosts either. NPR's Leila Fadel reports.

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4:44pm

Thu August 30, 2012
Politics

Ron Paul Supporters Get One Last Shout At RNC

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 6:09 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We turn now to my co-host, Robert Siegel, who's at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, where tonight Mitt Romney accepts his party's nomination for president. We're going to hear about that in a moment. But Robert, first, I understand there's some dissention in the ranks there, at the convention center. What's going on?

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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4:34pm

Thu August 30, 2012
Around the Nation

Despite Drought, Some Corn Farmers Reap Bounty

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 8:18 pm

Grimes Sweetcorn worker Paulette Vandyke waits to sell fresh corn in Grimes, Iowa. The drought has pushed the price of corn per bushel up nearly 40 percent in the past two months.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

For every farmer who is hurting this year during the drought, others are benefiting. Many fields in the South, Northwest and Upper Midwest are producing bountiful corn crops. And because the drought has pushed prices to record highs, farmers who have corn to sell expect a terrific payday.

"The corn has actually really, really taken off all the way through season. It's grown fast. It's been accelerated. The corn looks really good now," says John Scott, whose family farm in Sargeant, Minn., is just bursting with corn.

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3:52pm

Thu August 30, 2012
Politics and Government

Buerkle on election gender gap and the GOP

The gender gap looms large in the upcoming election.  Depending on the polls you look at, women support Democrats over Republicans by 10 to 20 percent but that does not necessarily mean the GOP is abandoning the women's vote, especially in the hotly contested 24th Congressional district race.

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2:51pm

Thu August 30, 2012
Humans

Pinky DNA Points To Clues About Ancient Humans

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 6:09 pm

A replica of the pinky bone fragment found in a Siberian cave. Researchers used the bone bit to extract and sequence the genome of a girl who lived tens of thousands of years ago.
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Scientists in Germany have been able to get enough DNA from a fossilized pinky to produce a high-quality DNA sequence of the pinky's owner.

"It's a really amazing-quality genome," says David Reich of Harvard Medical School in Boston. "It's as good as modern human genome sequences, from a lot of ways of measuring it."

The pinky belonged to a girl who lived tens of thousands of years ago. Scientists aren't sure about the exact age. She is a member of an extinct group of humans called Denisovans. The name comes from Denisova cave in Siberia, where the pinky was found.

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2:24pm

Thu August 30, 2012
Mom And Dad's Record Collection

Cole Porter Scores An Interracial Couple's Highs And Lows

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 6:09 pm

Cole Porter's "Begin the Beguine," a favorite song of listener Melanie Cowart's parents, became a fitting symbol for their relationship.
Sasha Getty Images

As summer winds down, All Things Considered is winding down its series "Mom and Dad's Record Collection."

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12:51pm

Thu August 30, 2012
Politics and Government

Syracuse "nuns on the bus" oppose Republican budget proposal

Members from various faith communities travel through Syracuse by school bus in solidarity with the Nuns on the Bus movement.
Ellen Abbot WRVO

The Republican federal budget proposal is being targeted by a Washington-based movement called Nuns on the Bus. Earlier this month, a group of nuns and others from local faith communities traveled around Syracuse in a school bus to spread their message in solidarity with the movement.

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12:32pm

Thu August 30, 2012
Afghanistan

For Afghan Leaders, Facing Death Is A Fact Of Life

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 8:17 pm

The aftermath of a truck bomb in Kandahar, the main city in southern Afghanistan, which wounded the provincial police chief and killed two civilians Monday. Taliban attacks against Afghan officials are up sharply this year.
Mamoon Durani AP

Almost daily, Taliban assassins target Afghan government officials and community elders with ambushes or bombings. The United Nations says such killings are up more than 50 percent compared to the same period last year.

On Monday, the target was the powerful police chief in southern Afghanistan's Kandahar province. A suicide bomber struck the convoy of Gen. Abdul Raziq, who survived the attack and is at a U.S. military hospital recuperating from burns and other injuries.

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5:56pm

Wed August 29, 2012
World

Often Isolated, Iran Hosts Huge International Summit

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 6:44 pm

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left) and Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad hold talks at the Iranian president's office in Tehran on Wednesday.
Behrouz Mehri AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. and other Western countries are often trying to isolate Iran, but this week the country is in the international spotlight as it hosts a summit of 120 nonaligned nations.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Kim-moon decided to go, ignoring the advice of Israel and the U.S. He promised to deliver a tough message, but others are skeptical, arguing that his visit plays into the hands of the Iranians and to U.N. detractors in Washington.

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5:47pm

Wed August 29, 2012
Animals

Drought Makes Bear Run-Ins More Common

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 6:06 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Encounters between humans and bears have risen in Western states, especially in Wyoming and Colorado. That's due largely to drought. Bears are traveling longer distances for food because the berries they usually eat have dried up.

As we hear from Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen, hungry bears are turning to dumpsters, kitchen cabinets and refrigerators.

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4:57pm

Wed August 29, 2012
Sports

U.S. Paralympian Makes Fifth Showing At The Games

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 6:06 pm

Melissa Block speaks with U.S. Paralympian and flag bearer at the Paralympics opening ceremony, Scott Danberg. The competition, which opens tonight in London, will be Danberg's fifth Paralympic Games. Over the years he has participated in multiple events, from power-lifting to javelin.

4:57pm

Wed August 29, 2012
Politics

Republican 'Party' Takes On New Meaning At RNC

Nominating the presidential and vice-presidential candidates is just part of the business conducted at a party convention. Delegates and guests also spend time attending workshops and policy sessions. And then there's the partying — lots of partying.

4:04pm

Wed August 29, 2012
The Salt

Unraveling The Mystery Of A Grandmother's Lost Ravioli Recipe

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:11 pm

Italian food expert Julia della Croce suggested Benner try a Tuscan sheep's cheese, or pecorino Toscano, for the filling.
Courtesy of Celina della Croce

NPR listener Alice Benner says her Italian grandmother made ravioli that was "indescribably delicious."

Benner told us that she's tried to re-create the recipe many times. "The dough — the consistency — is totally wrong, usually too thick," she writes.

Benner's grandmother used Romano cheese in the filling — probably from an Italian deli in Chicago — but Benner says when she makes the ravioli, "the Romano cheese I've used never has the same punch. I've all but given up trying to make them."

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3:57pm

Wed August 29, 2012
It's All Politics

GOP Convention Switches On Web Appeal For Isaac Relief

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 6:06 pm

The website of the 2012 Republican National Convention this afternoon.
2012 Republican convention

As Isaac continues to pound the Gulf Coast from Louisiana east through Mississippi, Republicans gathered in Tampa for their 2012 national convention continue to strike a balance between going on with their politicking and partying while trying not to look indifferent to the suffering of others.

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3:00pm

Wed August 29, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

With West Nile On The Rise, We Answer Your Questions

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 9:45 am

A Beechcraft airplane sprays insecticide over Dallas early Monday morning to curb the spread of West Nile virus.
LM Otero AP

This year is on track to be the worst ever for West Nile virus in the United States. Here are the latest numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

  • 1,590 reported cases, nearly 500 more than a week ago for a rise of 44 percent.
  • 889 cases, or 56 percent, involve severe neurological disease.
  • 66 deaths, compared to 41 last week.
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1:53pm

Wed August 29, 2012
Africa

Despite Critics, Gambia Plans Dozens Of Executions

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 8:16 pm

Gambian President Yahya Jammeh says all 47 death-row inmates will be executed by mid-September. Nine were killed this week by firing squad. Gambia's human rights record has frequently come under criticism during the 18 years of rule by Jammeh, shown here attending the African Union summit last month in Ethiopia.
Simon Maina AFP/Getty Images

There is growing international criticism over plans by Gambia's hard-line president to execute all of the country's death-row inmates within the next couple of weeks.

Gambia's leader, President Yahya Jammeh, has long faced criticism for his human rights record. In a recent speech marking the end of Ramadan, the Muslim holy month, the president vowed to put to death all prisoners facing the death penalty by mid-September, as a way to curb crime.

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8:52pm

Tue August 28, 2012
NPR Story

Speakers At The Republican Convention

Key speakers Tuesday include New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Ann Romney, the wife of the GOP presidential nominee.

5:22pm

Tue August 28, 2012
NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century

Parks Vie For Space In Miami's Forest Of Condos

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 8:52 pm

The skyline of the northern Brickell neighborhood in downtown Miami. Its residential population has more than doubled in the past decade.
Marc Averette Wikimedia Commons

Many cities around the nation are trying to revive their downtowns, adding more apartments and condominiums — usually high-rises — to lure new residents.

But as urban dwellers grow in numbers, they need places to get outside. Yet, in many cities, like Miami, neighborhood parks can be hard to find. The Trust for Public Land ranks Miami 94 on a list of 100 cities when it comes to park acreage per 1,000 residents — just 2.8 acres per 1,000 residents, versus 4.5 in New York and 6.2 in Los Angeles.

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5:22pm

Tue August 28, 2012
Sports

Debate Pits Strasburg's Health Against Wins

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 8:52 pm

Stephen Strasburg of the Washington Nationals pitches against the Atlanta Braves at Nationals Park last week.
Patrick McDermott Getty Images

One of the biggest debates in Washington, D.C., these days has nothing to do with taxes, health care or the economy. It's about baseball and whether the Washington Nationals should end the season of their young pitching star, Stephen Strasburg, just as the team may be headed for the playoffs.

Two years ago, Strasburg's promising career was threatened when he tore a ligament in his pitching arm. He needed surgery and couldn't pitch for a year.

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4:56pm

Tue August 28, 2012
Music

Dan Deacon On Computers, College And 'Electronic Music'

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 8:52 pm

Dan Deacon's latest project combines his signature electronic sound with live musicians and instruments.
Shawn Brackbrill Courtesy of Domino Records

4:54pm

Tue August 28, 2012
Around the Nation

Remembering Katrina, Louisianans Prepare For Isaac

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 8:52 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We're going to stay on the Gulf Coast for a moment. Earlier today we caught up Acy Cooper. He's a shrimp boat captain. And when we reached him, he had sought safe harbor on the intercoastal waterway near Belle Chasse. As you just heard, many of the locals have braved these storms before and Cooper is no exception. He lives in the town of Venice, but today we found the captain docked on his boat far inland from his home.

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4:50pm

Tue August 28, 2012
Politics

National Republicans release campaign ad in Maffei-Buerkle race

Last week, Democratic candidate Dan Maffei released the first television commercial in the highly contested 24th Congressional district. Now, the second ad for that race has come out, and it takes a decidedly different tone.

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4:34pm

Tue August 28, 2012
Regional Coverage

Syracuse seniors adjust to a year without Ida Benderson Center

The Syracuse Salvation Army is taking senior citizens to the New York State Fair this week.  It’s the kind of thing the Salvation Army has been trying to do since the city closed its own senior center. But the merging of seniors from the two centers has been an adjustment for some.  

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4:32pm

Tue August 28, 2012
Regional Coverage

The Post-Standard to publish three days a week

After more than one hundred years in circulation, Syracuse's newspaper is cutting production to three days a week.

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4:25pm

Tue August 28, 2012
The Two-Way

Malcolm Browne, Journalist Who Took The 'Burning Monk' Photo, Dies

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 10:36 pm

Journalist Malcome Browne took this iconic photo of the self-immolation of Buddhist monk Thich Quang Duc in Saigon in 1963. The monk committed suicide to protest what he called government persecution of Buddhists. Browne, who worked for the AP and later The New York Times, died Monday at age 81.
Malcom Browne AP

Malcolm Browne was a first-rate reporter who spent decades at The New York Times, covered wars around the world and won the Pulitzer Prize for his writing about the early days of the Vietnam war.

And yet he will forever be remembered for one famous picture, the 1963 photo of a Buddhist monk who calmly set himself on fire on the streets of Saigon to protest against the South Vietnamese government, which was being supported by the U.S.

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6:49pm

Mon August 27, 2012
All Tech Considered

Online University For All Balances Big Goals, Expensive Realities

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 6:54 pm

Students work at the University of the People student computer center in Haiti. Students from 129 countries are currently enrolled with the institution.
Courtesy of University of the People

Naylea Omayra Villanueva Sanchez, 22, lives on the edge of the Amazon rain forest in Tarapoto, northern Peru.

"Where I live, there's only jungle," Villanueva Sanchez says through an interpreter. "A university education is inaccessible."

And that's true in more ways than one. Villanueva Sanchez is in a wheelchair, the result of a motorcycle accident that left her paralyzed from the waist down.

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6:23pm

Mon August 27, 2012
Law

Judge Halts Ohio Law That Could Discount Votes

A judge has given Ohio unions a preliminary injunction stopping a new state law that could endanger provisional ballots cast in the wrong precinct, even if the cause is poll worker error.

5:30pm

Mon August 27, 2012
U.S.

Court Paves Way For Texas Planned Parenthood Cuts

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 6:23 pm

Abortion-rights opponents outside a Planned Parenthood of North Texas event in Fort Worth in February. The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that Texas can defund Planned Parenthood clinics because the organization provides abortions.
David Kent MCT/Landov

Officials in Texas say they will cut off state funding to Planned Parenthood following a federal court ruling last week. The decision by a panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals says the state can defund the health clinics because Planned Parenthood is associated with abortion.

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5:16pm

Mon August 27, 2012
Music Interviews

Ben Powell: In The Footsteps Of Jazz Fiddle Royalty

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 1:37 pm

Classically trained violinist Ben Powell makes the leap to jazz in his album New Street, a tribute to the late Stephane Grappelli.
Ryan MacDonald Courtesy of the artist

The late Stephane Grappelli is perhaps the best-known jazz violinist in history. His collaborations with guitarist Django Reinhardt have influenced countless musicians. A comparison to Grappelli is one of the highest honors a young, rising violinist can receive.

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