All Things Considered

Weekdays 4pm-7pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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4:45pm

Mon June 11, 2012
Music Reviews

Sidi Touré And The Sonic Heritage Of The Sahara

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 1:42 pm

Sidi Touré plays guitar and sings in the Songhaï tradition.
Jonathan Crawford

It's easy to romanticize the Sahara — a vast expanse of sand organized around the northern reaches of the Niger River. Part of that romance is captured in the music of singer and guitarist Sidi Touré, who composes songs in the folkloric tradition of the Songhaï people.

His new album of desert chamber music, Koïma, harkens back to the glory days of the Songhaï Empire, which ruled much of the region from the city of Gao in the 15th and 16th centuries.

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4:44pm

Mon June 11, 2012
Europe

Spain's Leader Calls It A 'Victory,' Not A Bailout

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 8:10 pm

Protesters rally against a bailout package for Spain in front of a Bank of Spain building in Barcelona on Monday. The demonstrators think the bailout will bring only greater hardship.
Josep Lago AFP/Getty Images

A day after getting approval for a financial rescue he vowed Spain would never need, Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy said it was his idea all along.

"No one pressured me into this. I pushed for it myself, because I wanted a line of credit," Rajoy said. He refused to call it a "bailout." He called it a "victory" instead.

Most Spaniards don't buy that. In a poll published Sunday, 78 percent of respondents said they have "little or no" faith in Rajoy and his ruling conservatives. That's just six months after they won elections in a landslide.

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4:11pm

Mon June 11, 2012
It's All Politics

Obama, Romney Campaigns Taking 'See What Sticks' Approach To Web Videos

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 8:10 pm

2:50pm

Mon June 11, 2012
Regional Coverage

Students remain unprepared even though graduation rates are on the rise

Rob Kleine Flickr

New York state's overall high school graduation rate continues to rise slowly over time. But one-quarter of students statewide don’t graduate high school after four years. These statistics are according to the New York State Education Department’s release of high school graduation rates for 2011.

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10:08am

Mon June 11, 2012
Regional Coverage

Balloons fly high over central New York

Matt Johnston/WRVO

The annual Jamesville Balloonfest held this weekend was packed to the brim with family-friendly entertainment, while organizers kept a watchful eye on the weather.

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5:05pm

Sun June 10, 2012
Politics

Future Of Health Care Law Hangs In Balance

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 6:01 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

At some point this month, maybe next week, maybe even tomorrow, the Supreme Court will decide whether all or parts of the Affordable Care Act, the health care law backed by the White House, is constitutional or not. And for that reason, a man in Oregon named Rocky King isn't sleeping very well. Have you slept in the past two years?

ROCKY KING: Three times.

RAZ: Three times in the past two years.

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5:05pm

Sun June 10, 2012
Interviews

Assessing Obama's Team Of Rivals

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 6:01 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Back in 2008, shortly before Barack Obama became President Obama, he told a reporter that an Obama Cabinet would be a team of rivals, smart people with different viewpoints who would, in Mr. Obama's words, push him out of his comfort zone.

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5:05pm

Sun June 10, 2012
Interviews

Bond Donned A Suit, A Stylish Suit

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 6:01 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, you're listening to WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz. Fifty years ago, a film franchise ushered in a new era of action, adventure, and of course, style.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RAZ: James Bond. Men wanted to look like him, and women also wanted men to look like him.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "DR. NO")

SEAN CONNERY: (as James Bond) Am I properly dressed for the occasion?

YVONNE SHIMA: (as Sister Lily) Quite suitable.

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12:03pm

Sun June 10, 2012
Music Interviews

Fiona Apple: 'I Don't Really Have A Plan'

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 7:43 pm

Known for brevity's sake as The Idler Wheel..., Fiona Apple's new album is her first in seven years.
Dan Monick

It's been seven years since Fiona Apple has released a new album. The singer-songwriter, who broke out in 1996 with Tidal, says the delay is a quirk of her creative process.

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4:51pm

Sat June 9, 2012
Politics

Accusations, Investigation Follow Intelligence Leaks

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 6:35 pm

The Justice Department has launched an investigation to determine the source of a series of leaks about sensitive intelligence matters. President Obama denied his administration authorized the leaks, but some Senate Republicans accused the White House of deliberately leaking the stories in order to boost the president's national security credentials.

4:51pm

Sat June 9, 2012
Politics

Could 'Taxmageddon' Crisis Create Compromise?

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 6:35 pm

On Jan. 1, trillions of dollars in spending cuts and tax increases — called Taxmageddon — will take effect unless Congress and the White House can agree on a new plan. Many economists say the country will fall back into a recession if it happens. Former Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin says Congress may actually be "forced to make a decision that affects taxes and spending."

4:51pm

Sat June 9, 2012
Middle East

Free Syrian Army Linked To Damascus Gunfire, Explosions

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 6:35 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Support for Syria's president, Bashar al-Assad, may be further deteriorating. That's after Russia's foreign minister, Sergey Lavrov, said his country would be glad to see Assad step down if most Syrians agreed. Russia's been one of the Syrian regime's staunchest supporters.

In Syria itself, another night of gunfire and explosions, some of it in the capital, Damascus. NPR's Deborah Amos is there and with me now.

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4:13pm

Sat June 9, 2012
Author Interviews

Steve Guttenberg Writes His Own 'Bible'

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 7:41 pm

Steve Guttenberg (left), Michael Winslow (center) and G.W. Bailey star in 1987's Police Academy 4: Citizens On Patrol, part of the film franchise launched by 1984's Police Academy.
Warner Bros./Getty Images

When Steve Guttenberg was 16, he went to see an agent about starting his acting career.

That agent told him: "You are the last guy I would pick to be a movie star."

Guttenberg decided to become an actor anyway.

The summer before he was supposed to start the University of Albany, he moved from Long Island to Los Angeles to try his luck. Once there, he tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz, he snuck onto the Paramount Studios lot, set up his own office, and started making phone calls to agents and producers.

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1:31pm

Sat June 9, 2012
Movies I've Seen A Million Times

The Movie Jared Harris Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 1:28 pm

Dustin Hoffman in Sydney Pollack's 1982 film, Tootsie.
Columbia / The Kobal Collection Columbia

The Weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For actor Jared Harris, whose credits include The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, and AMC's TV drama Mad Men, the movie he can't get enough of is Sydney Pollack's Tootsie. "It's just so brilliant," says Harris.

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12:03pm

Sat June 9, 2012
Music Interviews

'Call Me Maybe': Behind The Song Of The Summer

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 11:57 am

Carly Rae Jepsen is the 26-year-old singer behind the inescapable pop hit "Call Me Maybe."
Courtesy of the artist

6:14pm

Fri June 8, 2012
Middle East

In A Syrian Village, Evidence Of A Slaughter

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 10:03 pm

Anti-government protesters in the northern Syrian village of Hass protest on Thursday following the deaths of dozens of civilians a day earlier in the village of Mazraat al-Qubair. The banner reads, "The al-Qubair massacre challenges the world's humanity."
Edlib News Network AP

NPR correspondent Deborah Amos joined U.N. monitors and a small group of journalists Friday who were able to enter the Syrian village of Mazraat al-Qubair, where 78 people, including women and children, were killed on Wednesday by pro-government forces, according to opposition activists.

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4:45pm

Fri June 8, 2012
Around the Nation

Disastrous S.D. Flood Caused National Wake Up Call

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 9:57 pm

The 1972 flood in Rapid City, S.D., killed 238 people and destroyed more than 1,300 homes. The city responded by establishing a no-build zone in the flood plain. Other cities across the country adopted similar policies after the disaster.
Courtesy of Minnelusa Historical Association, Journey Museum

Survivors say the wall of water was like a tsunami that destroyed nearly everything in its path as it roared through a Black Hills canyon and into town. The flash flood that hit Rapid City, S.D., on June 9, 1972, was one of the worst floods in U.S. history. It killed 238 people and damaged or washed away more than 1,300 homes.

On Saturday, the city will read the names of those who died and reflect on how the flood changed the way the city and others towns across the country built themselves.

'It Was Hell'

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4:03pm

Fri June 8, 2012
The Salt

Food Truck Cookbook Tracks Best Meals Served On Wheels

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 6:59 pm

The crew of Shindigs sets up shop in a parking lot in Birmingham.
Debbie Elliott NPR

With recent news that even Paris has one, food trucks are certainly in vogue these days. In the U.S., they're now spreading from the hot scenes in Los Angeles and New York to smaller cities, like Milwaukee and Madison. Even school systems are jumping on the food truck bandwagon.

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3:47pm

Fri June 8, 2012
Latin America

Mexicans Want New Approach To Bloody Drug War

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 6:59 pm

A Mexican federal policeman guards the area where dozens of bodies, some of them mutilated, were found on a highway outside the northern Mexican city of Monterrey on May 13. The murders were one of the latest episodes in Mexico's brutal and unrelenting drug war.
Christian Palma AP

Second of two parts

Mexicans select a new president on July 1, and they want a leader who can reduce the rampant violence in their country. Warring drug cartels have killed more than 50,000 people in the past 5 1/2 years, while thousands have disappeared and some cities have been turned into lawless zones.

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3:17pm

Fri June 8, 2012
Science

Is Japanese Dock A Noah's Ark Or A Trojan Horse?

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 6:59 pm

Among the creatures that survived the trans-Pacific trek aboard the Japanese dock was this sea star, which was found inside the float.
Jessica Miller flickr

A bizarre event has drawn scientists to a beach in Oregon — a floating concrete dock from Japan has washed ashore. It had been ripped from its moorings by last year's tsunami and floated across the Pacific.

The dock is encrusted with mussels, barnacles and other marine life from Asia. Scientists are amazed these organisms survived the 14-month voyage, but they're also worried some of these organisms could become pests in U.S. waters.

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7:03am

Fri June 8, 2012
Book Reviews

Right On The Money: A 'Capital' Book For Our Times

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 6:59 pm

iStockphoto.com

Lizzie Skurnick writes the "That Should Be a Word" column for the New York Times Magazine.

England has always reveled in its drawing-room dramas, from Jane Austen's social minefields to E.M. Forster's Howards End to Upstairs, Downstairs — and yes, the blockbuster Downton Abbey.

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5:54pm

Thu June 7, 2012
Music Reviews

Music Review: 'Can You Canoe'

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

For many kids, summer means no homework, playing outdoors and, of course, traveling. Our children's music reviewer, Stefan Shepherd, tells us about a new album inspired by a trip down America's original interstate highway.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CAN YOU CANOE?")

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5:45pm

Thu June 7, 2012
It's All Politics

There's More Secret Money In Politics; Justice Kennedy Might Be Surprised

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 6:39 pm

Justice Anthony Kennedy, who wrote the Citizens United opinion saying that corporations can pay for ads expressly promoting or attacking political candidates.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Federal election law has required the public disclosure of campaign donors for nearly 40 years.

But this year, outside groups are playing a powerful role in the presidential election. And some of them disclose nothing about their donors. That's despite what the Supreme Court said in its controversial Citizens United ruling two years ago.

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5:09pm

Thu June 7, 2012
Poetry

New U.S. Poet Laureate: A Southerner To The Core

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 5:54 pm

The United States named its 19th poet laureate today: Natasha Trethewey, a professor of English and creative writing at Emory University in Atlanta. She is the nation's first poet laureate to hail from the South since the initial laureate — Robert Penn Warren — was named by the Library of Congress in 1986.

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4:40pm

Thu June 7, 2012
Latin America

Mexico's Once Dominant Party Poised For A Comeback

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 5:54 pm

Mexican presidential front-runner Enrique Pena Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, waves to the crowds during a campaign stop in the northern border city of Tijuana, Mexico, on June 3. The once dominant PRI, out of power for the past 12 years, looks likely to make a comeback.
Alex Cossio AP

First of two parts

As Mexico approaches its election day on July 1, polls indicate the candidate for the opposition Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, is well ahead and appears likely to return his party to power.

The PRI governed Mexico for seven decades until 2000, when it was tossed out by an electorate tired of a corrupt political machine. Now, discontent with the current leadership and the rampant drug-related violence has created an opening for the PRI to come back. Still, some Mexicans are queasy about the prospect of the party's resurgence.

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4:18pm

Thu June 7, 2012
Movie Interviews

Damon Lindelof Risks The Wrath Of Loyal Fans Again

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 7:35 pm

Damon Lindelof moderated a conversation with Charlize Theron, who stars in the new Ridley Scott thriller Prometheus, at the 2011 Comic-Con. Lindelof co-wrote the film.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Damon Lindelof was a producer on the 2009 reboot of Star Trek, which seemed to win over loyal Trekkies. And this weekend Lindelof will earn the devotion — or wrath — of Alien fans. He helped write the screenplay for the new film Prometheus, an origin story for Ridley Scott's 1979 sci-fi classic.

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2:29pm

Thu June 7, 2012
Regional Coverage

New York Works program to fix roads and create jobs

The budget for fixing New York State roads and bridges has almost doubled this year, thanks to the transportation portion of the New York Works program.  The $1.2 billion program will repair roads and bridges, but it is also intended to function as a jobs and economic development engine.

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1:58pm

Thu June 7, 2012
The Two-Way

Drink Up! Idaho OKs 'Five Wives' Vodka

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 5:54 pm

Bottles of Ogden's Own Distillery Five Wives Vodka at a state liquor store in Salt Lake City.
Brian Skoloff AP

The state of Idaho's Liquor Division has changed its mind about Five Wives vodka.

The vodka, which as we said last week had been banned from Idaho's liquor stores because its name and label might offend women and Mormons, is going to be allowed to be sold in the state.

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1:46pm

Thu June 7, 2012
Asia

Bankrupt At Home, Philly Orchestra Looks To China

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 8:17 pm

The Philadelphia Orchestra, which declared bankruptcy last year, has been performing in China, where it is looking to develop new streams of revenue.
Frank Langfitt NPR

The Philadelphia Orchestra has just wrapped up a 10-day visit to China, its seventh trip to the country over the past four decades.

But this trip was different.

The orchestra is preparing to come out of bankruptcy, and this tour was about its survival. It hopes to balance its books by building new audiences and new revenues in the world's second-largest economy.

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6:41pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Health

Children Getting CT Scans At Higher Risk For Cancer

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

New research out today indicates that a popular medical test may increase the risk for some forms of cancer. A large international study found that CAT scans, which are also known as CT scans, can increase the risk for leukemia and brain cancer in children.

NPR's Rob Stein joins us now to talk about the new findings. And, Rob, I understand the concerns about these scans have been building for a long time. So what's the specific source of worry here?

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