All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the more than four decades since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Kelly McEvers and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Michel Martin.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators.

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Ways to Connect

The Orlando shootings sent a wave of shock across the city that is known as a premier destination for gay nightlife. Pulse is one of about a dozen gay bars and nightclubs. Some clubs closed temporarily at the request of police while safety protocols are revised; others are hiring armed security guards and remaining open.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Orlando Starts To Release Names Of Victims

Jun 12, 2016
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

On The Ground In Orlando

Jun 12, 2016
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Copyright 2016 WMFE-FM. To see more, visit WMFE-FM.

Susan Phillips studies and writes about graffiti as an anthropologist. In 2000, while doing research for her book, Wallbangin': Graffiti and Gangs in LA, she stumbled upon some graffiti that stunned her.

Under a century-old bridge near the Los Angeles River, Phillips discovered what appeared to be grease-pencil markings – a practically extinct type of American hieroglyphics called hobo graffiti.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Colombians Prepare For The Prospect Of Peace

Jun 11, 2016
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'I Won't Feel Safe On My College Campus'

Jun 11, 2016
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Maybe it's a dive trip to Belize. Or a cruise in the Caribbean. Or maybe you've snagged tickets to the summer Olympics in Rio. If you're traveling in places where Zika is circulating, there are a few things you need to keep in mind — and bring along.

The first question is: Should you go on the trip at all?

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

During the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the U.S. military did an about-face on detecting and treating brain injuries caused by explosions. After years of routinely sending blast-exposed troops back into combat, the military implemented a system that requires screening and treatment for traumatic brain injury.

The change came about in large part because of a remarkable campaign by an elite team of military officers who were also doctors and scientists. They worked for the highest-ranking officer in the armed forces. And they were known simply as the Gray Team.

The Life Of Muhammad Ali, In His Own Words

Jun 10, 2016
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Onondaga County Executive Joanie Mahoney is defending the state's economic development competitions such as the Upstate Revitalization Initiative, which pitted different regions of the state against each other for financial aid. Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s economic development projects have come under fire as the Buffalo Billion project is currently under a federal investigation.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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