All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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Composer ID: 
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3:55pm

Mon November 14, 2011
Author Interviews

In Don DeLillo's 'Angel,' Stories Of America Alone

Novelist Don DeLillo is known for his sweeping works of fiction, including White Noise, Falling Man, Libra and Underworld. His latest work, The Angel Esmeralda, is a collection of nine short stories.
Joyce Ravid Scribner

Over the past 30 years, prolific American author Don DeLillo has written more than a dozen novels, including White Noise, Falling Man, Libra and Underworld. But his latest, The Angel Esmeralda, is a departure from his expansive novels. It is a collection of short stories — nine brief flashes, which, like DeLillo's longer works, center on characters who feel out of sync with the worlds around them.

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3:47pm

Mon November 14, 2011
Music Interviews

Keith Jarrett: Alone In Rio And Ready To Fail

Keith Jarrett's new album is Rio, recorded live in Brazil.
Daniela Yohannes ECM Records

On April 9 of this year, the jazz pianist Keith Jarrett sat alone on the stage of an old opera house in Rio de Janeiro, his only company a piano — an American Steinway he described as "not perfect at all."

For nearly two hours, Jarrett played — as he often does — without any idea of what was coming next. It was sheer improvisation.

He says the result, now available on the album Rio, was some of the best music he's ever produced in a career spanning almost 50 years.

Moment To Moment

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7:00am

Mon November 14, 2011
You Must Read This

Trapped In A Nightmare: A Sweet, Funny, Brutal Read

Ismet Prcic is the author of Shards.

Have you ever read a novel that is so propulsive you don't want to put it down (not even to play with your new kitten), and so well-plotted that it doesn't reveal itself to you until its 288th page — which just happens to be the book's final page as well? Marabou Stork Nightmares by Irvine Welsh is that kind of a novel.

On first glance, if you simply picked it up and shuffled its pages, it might not look appealing to some readers.

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4:31pm

Sun November 13, 2011
Art & Design

Daphne Guinness: An Icon On Fashion's Cutting Edge

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:16 am

Eileen Costa Courtesy of The Museum at FIT

A good friend of mine is a Marcel Proust scholar and former milliner. She had just been to see fashion icon and brewery fortune heiress Daphne Guinness's exhibition at the Fashion Institute of Technology's Museum at FIT in New York when she sent me this email:

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3:46pm

Sun November 13, 2011
Arts & Life

Mmm, Is That Roast Beef You Smell? No, It's Perfume

A Labor of Love: For his "I Hate Perfume" collection, Christopher Brosius blends and bottles all of his scents by hand in his workshops. The process may be labor-intensive, but it allows him to create singular scents that can't be mass-produced.
Courtesy of CB I Hate Perfume

Would you wear a perfume that made you smell like "A Day at the Beach?" How about "Baby's Butt?" If so, scent inventor Christopher Brosius can help. His Brooklyn boutique is at the vanguard of the anti-perfume movement, as you might suspect by its name: I Hate Perfume.

"I'm not out to sell millions of bottles," Brosius tells weekends on All Things Considered guest host Jacki Lyden. "My work is really about things that really do smell wonderful, but don't have a lot of the properties that commercial perfumes do."

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2:58pm

Sun November 13, 2011
Music Interviews

Betty Wright: Soul Singer, Legacy Protector

Betty Wright's new album, her first in 10 years, is called Betty Wright: The Movie.
Diana Levine Courtesy of the artist

"I don't feel like I need to tell any lies," Betty Wright says. "You get to an age where you get tired of hiding behind whatever people think is correct. You just say what you have to say, and if they don't like it, it's OK."

Wright found fame in the 1970s as the voice behind the R&B hits "Clean Up Woman" and "Dance With Me." Today, Wright is much in demand as a vocalist, coach, writer, arranger and producer. Her first album out in 10 years is out this week; it's called Betty Wright: The Movie.

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5:30pm

Sat November 12, 2011
Three-Minute Fiction

Three-Minute Fiction: The Round 7 Winner Is ...

iStockphoto.com

Round 7 of our Three-Minute Fiction contest attracted more than 3,000 story submissions. Tasked with writing an original short story that can be read in about three minutes, contestants had to include one character arriving to town and one character leaving town.

The judge for this round, writer Danielle Evans, has picked her favorite.

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3:00pm

Sat November 12, 2011
Analysis

Week In News: Obama's Health Law Constitutional

This week D.C. Court of Appeals agreed with the White House that the health care law does not violate the Constitution. The court's senior judge, a respected conservative voice, wrote the majority opinion. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Jacki Lyden speaks with James Fallows of The Atlantic about this story and others from the past week.

12:50pm

Sat November 12, 2011
Music Interviews

My Brightest Diamond: Home Is Where The Art Is

My Brightest Diamond is the indie-pop project of classically trained singer and composer Shara Worden.
Danny Renshaw Courtesy of the artist

There's no mistaking the protagonist of "Be Brave," a song from the new My Brightest Diamond album, All Things Will Unwind. Shara Worden, the group's classically trained singer, songwriter, and main creative force, makes it clear in the refrain: "Shara, now get to work/Shara, this is going to hurt."

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4:26pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Theater

Hugh Jackman, Back On Broadway And Having A Blast

Hugh Jackman
Joan Marcus

Hugh Jackman has had one of the most bifurcated showbiz careers imaginable. He leapt to superstardom as the mutton-chopped mutant Wolverine in the X-Men movies and won a Tony Award as the gay Australian entertainer Peter Allen in The Boy from Oz. These days, he's starring in the robot-boxing film Real Steel and appearing on Broadway in a one-man show.

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3:00pm

Fri November 11, 2011
From Our Listeners

Letters: Ninja Librarians; Master Of Library Science

Robert Siegel and Guy Raz revisit arguably one of the program's most memorable phrases this week: ninja librarians. Also, they address one listener's email about the degree of Master of Library Science.

2:19pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Music Interviews

The Subspecies Of Pianists, Or, What Jerry Lee Lewis And Beethoven Share

Jerry Lee Lewis, a pianist Isacoff classifies as a 'combustible,' performs at the Rainbow in London in 1972.
Graham Wood Getty Images

The art of the piano is a study in evolution — of both an instrument and of human talent. Among us there have been a rare few whose gifts included the physical dexterity, the innate musicality and the creativity to make the instrument sound brilliant.

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2:15pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Music News

Vets Write Music To Heal The Wounds Of War

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 8:35 pm

In front of the Texas flag: Iraq vet and aspiring songwriter Buddy Lee Dobberteen.
John Burnett

Veterans Day is the day when Americans remember and thank members of the armed forces who fought in foreign wars. Nearly 1.4 million men and women have left the service since serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. A group of musicians in San Marcos, Texas, just down the highway from Austin, has started a songwriting workshop especially for returning veterans, believing that composing music can help a person heal from the wounds of war.

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7:00am

Fri November 11, 2011
Opinion

Coming Home To Less Than A Hero's Welcome

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 5:25 pm

Karl Marlantes receives the Navy Cross in the winter of 1969-70.
USMC

Karl Marlantes is the author of What It Is Like To Go To War.

I returned to America in October of 1969 after 13 months as a Marine in Vietnam. While I was there, I would comfort myself by imagining all the girls I ever knew hugging me in a huge warm group embrace. Somehow, I thought something similar would be waiting for me when I came home.

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3:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
Around the Nation

Portland, Ore., Mayor Orders 'Occupiers' Out

Guy Raz speaks with Portland, Ore., Mayor Sam Adams who today ordered the Occupy protesters in his city out of their encampments by 12:01 a.m. Sunday. The move comes after he wrote an open letter to the protesters, saying their living conditions were unsustainable.

3:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
Energy

Feds Delay Decision On Pipeline Project

The State Department is delaying a decision for at least a year on whether to approve the Keystone pipeline. The $7 billion pipeline would carry oil from the tar sands of Alberta, Canada, through the U.S. to Gulf of Mexico refineries. Nebraska's state government and environmental groups have put intense pressure on the State Department and White House to reject the pipeline's proposed route. NPR's Richard Harris talks with Robert Siegel about the project.

3:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
Politics

Senate Panel Votes To Repeal Marriage Act

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: Fifteen years ago, Congress overwhelmingly approved the Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA. It said, while each state could decide how to define marriage, the federal government would only recognize the legal union of a man and a woman.

Since then, more than 130,000 same-sex couples have legally married in the U.S. and today, a congressional committee passed the very first measure to repeal DOMA. NPR's David Welna reports.

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3:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
NPR Story

Greece Announces Interim Government

After keeping a nervous world waiting for days, the squabbling politicians of debt-ridden Greece finally announced a new interim government Thursday. It will be headed by a former European Central banker, Lucas Papademos, whose main task will be to ensure that Greece meets the conditions set by its European partners to receive new loan money and avoid default. That means showing that Greece will enforce austerity measures.

3:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
NPR Story

Latest Economic News Sparks Optimism In U.S.

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 7:32 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Maybe it's not so bad. That seemed to be the read of investors when they saw today's economic numbers. Better than expected news about unemployment stoked some optimism that the U. S. will avoid a double-dip recession. And stock market recovered a bit from yesterday's drop.

But the news is not as good in Europe, as NPR's Chris Arnold reports

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3:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
NPR Story

Murdoch Son Grilled Over Phone-Hacking Scandal

A steady drip of revelations in the News Corp. phone-hacking scandal has called into question James Murdoch's testimony before a parliamentary committee in July. Murdoch has been asked back to clarify the discrepancies.

3:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
Sports

Interim Coach Has 'Mixed Emotions' Leading Penn

Defensive coordinator Tom Bradley held his first press conference Thursday as interim coach of Penn State's football team. Bradley was appointed after the board of trustees abruptly fired coach Joe Paterno on Wednesday night amid a child sex abuse scandal involving one of his former assistant coaches.

3:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
Book Reviews

'Mrs. Nixon,' An Unexpected Gift

Alan Cheuse reviews a new book from Ann Beattie. Mrs. Nixon tells the story of an author as she tackles the challenge of writing a biography of former first lady Pat Nixon. Cheuse teaches writing at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va.

3:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
Election 2012

Perry Campaign Tries To Right Debate 'Oops'

Texas Gov. Rick Perry drew a blank at last night's GOP presidential debate, forgetting one of three federal agencies he would eliminate if he becomes president.

7:24pm

Wed November 9, 2011
Economy

Jefferson County, Ala, Files For Bankruptcy

Lawmakers in Jefferson County, Ala., voted Wednesday to file for bankruptcy. It will be the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. For more, Guy Raz talks with Tanya Ott of member station WBHM in Birmingham.

3:00pm

Wed November 9, 2011
The Record

How Spotify Works: Pay The Majors, Use P2P Technology

Ken Parks, head of Spotify's New York office: "With a streaming service like Spotify that gives you access to everything in the world instantaneously, those distinctions between ownership and access tend to disappear."

Diana Levine Courtesy of Spotify

If you've ever tried listening to music on a web site, you've probably had the experience of waiting ... and waiting ... for a song to start. The cloud music service Spotify thinks it's found a way around to get music to your computer faster; employing some of the same technology the music industry has been fighting against for years.

One of the first things you notice about Spotify is how quickly it starts playing the song you want to hear — even if it's not already stored on your computer. There's no wait for buffering or downloading. Spotify feels, in a word, instant.

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3:00pm

Wed November 9, 2011
NPR Story

Penn State's Patero Announces His Retirement

Legendary Penn State football coach Joe Patero announced his retirement Wednesday, as his football program continues to be rocked by allegations of child sex abuse and cover up.

3:00pm

Wed November 9, 2011
NPR Story

Ridpath Discusses Ethics In College Supports

Robert Siegel speaks to Dave Ridpath, an assistant professor of sports administration at Ohio University. Ridpath, a former Division 1 wrestling coach and assistant athletic director at Marshall University, has called the current system of college sports "broken." He says that the current scandal at Penn State is the most extreme example of a college sports system that protects teams at all costs.

10:15pm

Tue November 8, 2011
NPR Story

Ohio Repeals Collective-Bargaining Law

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 10:15 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

This was election day, and voters in Ohio rejected a referendum that would have limited the collective bargaining rights of state and local employee unions. Today's result is a blow to the state's Republican Governor, John Kasich, who had championed the measure.

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6:26pm

Tue November 8, 2011
Presidential Race

Cain Holds Press Conference To Address Allegations

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 10:15 pm

GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain gave a press conference to address allegations that he made unwanted sexual advances toward female employees and a woman seeking job advice in the 1990s. Cain emphasized that the accusations were false. NPR's Tamara Keith joins Robert Siegel to explain.

5:12pm

Tue November 8, 2011
Monkey See

Leonardo DiCaprio Brings The Complex 'J. Edgar' To Life On Film

Originally published on Wed November 9, 2011 11:42 am

J. Leo: DiCaprio as Hoover in J. Edgar.
Keith Bernstein Warner Bros. Pictures

In Clint Eastwood's new film J. Edgar, Leonardo DiCaprio plays J. Edgar Hoover, the controversial longtime FBI director, from youth through old age. And when you play a man for that long, you might expect to sympathize with him somewhat. But DiCaprio tells Guy Raz on today's All Things Considered that he doesn't have sympathy or empathy for Hoover.

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