All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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Composer ID: 
5187f6dee1c8bbad399ea0b8|5187f6c5e1c8bbad399ea079

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6:20pm

Mon November 21, 2011
Economy

Obama Blames Republicans For Debt Panel's Failure

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 9:27 pm

President Obama Monday put the blame for the supercommittee's failure squarely on congressional Republicans — and their unwillingness to consider higher taxes on the wealthy. Obama also threatened to veto any effort to escape from the automatic spending cuts agreed to in August without a balanced plan to reduce the deficit. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Scott Horsley for more.

6:17pm

Mon November 21, 2011
Politics

Supercommittee Fails To Reach Debt Deal

The bipartisan supercommittee says it failed to reach a deficit-reduction deal. NPR's Tamara Keith speaks to Robert Siegel with the latest from Capitol Hill.

4:08pm

Mon November 21, 2011
Three Books...

Presidents And Pilgrims: 3 Boundary Pushing Books

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 9:27 pm

Donna Neary flickr.com

With Thanksgiving hard upon us, now is a good time to think about our past. History writers can tell the best stories from centuries of human achievement and folly, yet too often they produce recitations of one damned thing after another. A few, though, combine a respect for accuracy with a deep understanding of the longings, fears and triumphs of the people of our past. Such books make magic.

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3:21pm

Mon November 21, 2011
Music Interviews

Yo-Yo Ma's Bluegrass-Inspired 'Goat Rodeo'

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 1:27 pm

Yo-Yo Ma's latest Americana exploration features his work with mandolinist Chris Thile, bassist Edgar Meyer and fiddler Stuart Duncan.
Jeremy Cowart

A sense of humor comes through The Goat Rodeo Sessions, the latest Americana exploration for the world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma.

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3:00pm

Mon November 21, 2011
NPR Story

As Governor, Romney Deleted Electronic Footprint

Before Mitt Romney left the Massachusetts governor's office, 11 of his aides purchased more than a dozen computer hard drives and the administration wiped a server clean. The Boston Globe first reported the story last week. Aides to Romney's Republican predecessors describe the actions as unprecedented. Romney defended his administration at a campaign appearance on Saturday. And his campaign has filed a public records request for contacts between the administration of Romney's successor, Democratic Governor Deval Patrick and President Obama's reelection campaign.

5:48pm

Sun November 20, 2011
Television

How One Man Played 'Moneyball' With 'Jeopardy!'

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 6:32 pm

Roger Craig poses with Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek after winning $250,000 in last week's Tournament of Champions.
Carol Kaelson Sony Pictures

One night last September, Roger Craig, a computer scientist from Newark, Del., was about to make history.

In his second appearance on Jeopardy!, he'd given one of the most dominant performances ever seen on the show.

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3:00pm

Sun November 20, 2011
NPR Story

Egyptian Security Cracks Down In Tahrir Square

A second uprising seems to be developing in Cairo. Protesters in Tahrir Square, angry with the military-led transitional government, increased in number recently as police clashes with them have become more violent. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan talks with reporter Merrit Kennedy about the situation in Egypt.

3:00pm

Sun November 20, 2011
NPR Story

Libya Weighs Life After Gadhafi

It's been one month since Moammar Gadhafi's death. Libyans were celebrating within hours of his killing. A month later, the jubilance has waned and the violence continues. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan talks with New York Times correspondent Clifford Krauss from Tripoli.

2:15pm

Sun November 20, 2011
Author Interviews

Bill Maher Lays Down The (Mostly Silly) Law

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 6:32 pm

Comedian Bill Maher is the host of the HBO political commentary show, Real Time With Bill Maher.
Janet Van Ham AP

Comedian Bill Maher wraps up every installment of his TV show, Real Time, with a segment called "New Rules." That's where he takes potshots at whatever's bothering him — from wrappers on ice cream cones, to red light cameras, to more serious subjects like war and economic ruin.

His new book, The New New Rules: A Funny Look at How Everybody But Me Has Their Head Up Their Ass, sports a title we can't say on the radio and a mix of rules both lighthearted and serious, some of which never appeared on television.

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1:58am

Sun November 20, 2011
Music Interviews

The Man Behind The Music Of 'Entourage' Sets The Tone

Scott Vener is the music supervisor for How to Make It in America. The finale of the second season airs Sunday night on HBO.
Jeff Forney HBO

Scott Vener is the music supervisor for How to Make It in America, which air its season finale Sunday night on HBO.

"I would say primarily a lot of the music I'm finding is sort of like what is bubbling on the Internet," Vener says.

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3:00pm

Sat November 19, 2011
Analysis

Week In News: Obama Wraps Up Asia Tour

Originally published on Sat November 19, 2011 6:37 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

It's Weekends on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

MAHMOUD SHAMMAM: What we can confirm now that Saif al-Gadhafi has been arrested and he should be tried in front of the Libyan court, by Libyan people and by Libyan justice.

SULLIVAN: That's Mahmoud Shammam, Libya's National Transitional Council's information minister, announcing that Moammar Gadhafi's son Saif al-Islam had been captured. The U.S. State Department hasn't confirmed it yet.

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1:57pm

Sat November 19, 2011
Science

Perhaps Scientists Like Lab Mice TOO Much

The lab mouse is the most ubiquitous animal in biomedical research, but that doesn't mean it's always the best subject for researching disease.

In a series of articles for Slate magazine, Daniel Engber looked into why the mouse is such a mainstay of science — and whether that's a good thing.

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1:19pm

Sat November 19, 2011
Music Interviews

We Are Augustines: Old Wounds Inspire Recovery Songs

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 4:32 pm

We Are Augustines' debut album is Rise Ye Sunken Ships. Left to right: Eric Sanderson, Rob Allen, Billy McCarthy.
Arwen Hunt Courtesy of the artist

Billy McCarthy lost his mother to suicide when he was a teenager. He cared for his schizophrenic brother as best he could after that, but his brother landed in solitary confinement in prison, where he eventually took his own life, too. Somehow, McCarthy found a way to rise above his anguish — as a songwriter. He began playing music while living in foster care in California.

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1:01pm

Sat November 19, 2011
Author Interviews

Kurt Vonnegut Was Not A Happy Man. 'So It Goes.'

Author Kurt Vonnegut, shown in 1979 in New York City, died in 2007 at age 84.
Marty Reichenthal AP

Kurt Vonnegut was a counterculture hero, an American Mark Twain, an avuncular, jocular friend to the youth — until you got to know him.

"Kurt was actually rather flinty, rather irascible. He had something of a temper," author Charles Shields tells weekends on All Things Considered host Laura Sullivan. Shields is the author of a new biography of Vonnegut, called And So It Goes: Kurt Vonnegut: A Life.

"But as I also point out in the book," Shields adds, "he was a damaged person."

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5:41pm

Fri November 18, 2011
Music Interviews

A.A. Bondy: Making His Own World

A.A. Bondy performs at The Waiting Room in Omaha, Neb. He says it took him eight days to write his new album, Believers.
Hilary Stohs-Krause

One Friday night at The Waiting Room in Omaha, Neb., more than 150 people are milling around waiting for A.A. Bondy to take the stage. His new album, Believers, came out two months ago and caught fans like Andre Steinbergs by surprise.

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3:00pm

Fri November 18, 2011
NPR Story

'Managed' Apple Creates A Buzz

Melissa Block talks with John Seabrook, staff writer at The New Yorker. His latest article, "Crunch," delves into the world of the SweeTango — a new hybrid apple that is part Honeycrisp, part Zestar. It's sweet and tangy. There's a hint of cinnamon, a hint of pineapple and a whole lot of crunch.

3:00pm

Fri November 18, 2011
NPR Story

Army Successfully Tests Hypersonic Missile

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 8:02 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Imagine flying from L.A. to New York in about 30 minutes. That's roughly eight times the speed of sound. And yesterday, the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command managed to launch a missile that flew at that speed. The test missile was sent from Hawaii to hit a site on the Kwajalein Atoll in the South Pacific about 2,400 miles away, and within a half hour, the missile struck its target. And the military is hoping to speed it up even more.

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3:00pm

Fri November 18, 2011
Sports

NBA In Turmoil As MLB Takes Care Of Business

While the professional basketball season is on the verge of collapse, Major League Baseball and its players wrapped up a new contract. Guy Raz talks with sportswriter Stefan Fatsis about what's next in the NBA negotiations and what's new for baseball with this agreement.

3:00pm

Fri November 18, 2011
Science

Scientists Claim Neutrinos Are Faster Than Light

Scientists at the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics are now touting a successful second experiment that may challenge Albert Einstein's long-held theory of relativity. The results show that neutrinos could travel faster than the speed of light. Guy Raz talks to Brian Greene, professor of physics and mathematics at Columbia University, about the findings.

5:49pm

Thu November 17, 2011
NPR Story

Obama Turns Focus On Pacific Allies

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 5:59 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. President Obama arrived in Indonesia today, the latest stop in a 10 day trip across the Pacific. He's used the trip to send a message that the U.S. is shifting its attention to the Asia Pacific region, both for economic and security reasons. That includes the announcement yesterday that the U.S. will deploy 2,500 Marines to Australia.

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4:49pm

Thu November 17, 2011
Author Interviews

U.S. Behind The Curve In Drunk Driving, Author Finds

A new book called One for the Road explores the history of drunk driving and attitudes around it.
iStockphoto.com

When Barron Lerner was writing his book on the history of drunk driving in America — and efforts to control it — he carried out an experiment at home that involved a bottle of vodka, a shot glass and a Breathalyzer. He was the guinea pig.

"I was trying to figure out just how drunk you had to be in order to not drive safely," says Lerner, a professor of medicine and public health at Columbia University, who wrote One for the Road. He decided to drink and test his levels — but he didn't actually get into a car.

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4:00pm

Thu November 17, 2011
The Record

A Televised Singing Competition With A Mission

Pia Maria Holmgren (Sámi in Sweden) performs at last year's Liet International minority song contest.
Sandro Weltin/Council of Europe

Auditions are now underway for next May's Eurovision Song Contest — that often-ridiculed television spectacle that has drawn millions of viewers around the world every year since 1956. In 2012 the host country will be Azerbaijan, since that country fielded last year's winner.

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3:06pm

Thu November 17, 2011
History

Dead Sea Scrolls On Display In Times Square

The ancient texts can be seen up close — right in the middle of New York City. There are some theatrics, but NPR's Margot Adler reports that the exhibit is happily understated.

3:00pm

Thu November 17, 2011
NPR Story

Rep. Bachus Defends Trades

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 7:52 pm

House Financial Services Committee Chairman Spencer Bachus faces questions about his stock purchases.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

The STOCK Act, a bill that would ban members of Congress from trading stock based on nonpublic information they get because they're lawmakers, has 61 co-sponsors and counting. And after years of languishing with only one hearing, the measure is getting one in the House Financial Services Committee.

What's remarkable about this is that the STOCK Act had just nine co-sponsors last week. What changed? The CBS news magazine 60 Minutes did a story about congressional insider trading.

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3:00pm

Thu November 17, 2011
NPR Story

Chicagoans Join Occupy 'Day Of Disruption'

Occupy Wall Street protesters in Chicago mark the movement's second month. Cheryl Corley

3:00pm

Thu November 17, 2011
NPR Story

Pelosi Makes Joke At Perry's Expense

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi poked fun at GOP presidential candidate Rick Perry when she responded to his challenge to debate her next Monday. Pelosi said she had three other engagements that day — but forgot the third.

12:15pm

Thu November 17, 2011
Opinion

National Book Award Winner Tells Tale Of Katrina

istockphoto.com

Jesmyn Ward's novel, Salvage the Bones, won this year's National Book Award in fiction.

When you live on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, stories of hurricanes are passed down through generations. For my parents the storm was called Camille, and on Aug. 17, 1969, it made landfall.

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4:39pm

Wed November 16, 2011
Music Interviews

R.E.M., R.I.P.

Originally published on Wed November 16, 2011 6:02 pm

R.E.M. in the early days. Left to right: Michael Stipe, Mike Mills, Bill Berry, Peter Buck.
Laura Levine

They were four guys out of Athens, Ga., with a three-letter name — and one hell of an impact on rock. R.E.M. was Michael Stipe singing lead, Mike Mills on bass and harmonies, Peter Buck on guitar and Bill Berry on drums, until Berry left the band in 1997.

"We never expected the thing to last any longer than a couple of years to begin with," Stipe says. "And then when it did, and we were making records and people were interested in it, the band started getting bigger and bigger and bigger."

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4:35pm

Wed November 16, 2011
Monkey See

DVD Picks: 'West Side Story'

Originally published on Wed November 16, 2011 6:02 pm

'Tonight' Music: Richard Beymer and Natalie Wood played Tony and Maria in the 1961 film of West Side Story.
Fox Home Entertainment

Time now for a home video recommendation from movie critic Bob Mondello. This week he's looking back a half-century, to a ground-breaking musical that won ten Oscars, West Side Story.

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3:51pm

Wed November 16, 2011
Books News & Features

Ann Patchett Opens Parnassus Books In Nashville

The world of independent bookstores has a new member: Parnassus Books in Nashville, Tenn., opened its doors on Wednesday. The store has a marquee name behind it — best-selling novelist Ann Patchett, author of Bel Canto and State of Wonder, is the co-owner.

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