All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Mark Lavonier
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Composer ID: 
5187f6dee1c8bbad399ea0b8|5187f6c5e1c8bbad399ea079

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3:00pm

Thu September 29, 2011
NPR Story

Proposed Alaska Mine Faces Fierce Opposition

In Alaska's picturesque Bristol Bay region, developers are looking to build an enormous copper and gold mine. They promise the effort will be carried out in an environmentally responsible way — and provide area jobs. But fisherman, conservationists and native groups have joined efforts to thwart the mine, fearing it will pollute area fish and wildlife. Melissa Block talks about the battle for Bristol Bay with reporter Daysha Eaton of member station KDLG in Dillingham, Alaska.

1:15pm

Thu September 29, 2011
The Record

Sylvia Robinson, Who Helped Make 'Rapper's Delight,' Has Died

Originally published on Thu September 29, 2011 6:15 pm

A press photo of Sylvia Robinson from around 1992.
Al Pereira Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Sylvia Robinson, who died Thursday morning in a New Jersey hospital, built the very first rap label. She was 75 years old and reportedly suffered congestive heart failure.

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6:10pm

Wed September 28, 2011
Health

Health Officials: Listeria Outbreak Linked To 13 Deaths

A listeria outbreak linked to cantaloupes from Colorado has infected 72 people in the United States and killed 13, U.S. health officials said on Tuesday. The food-borne outbreak is the deadliest in the United States in more than a decade, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

3:00pm

Wed September 28, 2011
NPR Story

How Will Amazon's Fire Impact Apple?

On Wednesday, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced the release of a tablet device called Fire. Michele Norris will talk with NPR's Laura Sydell about what this means for Amazon, Apple and consumers.

3:00pm

Wed September 28, 2011
NPR Story

Cast Of Characters Compete In Irish Elections

Melissa Block talks to Irish Times reporter Ronan McGreevy about the interesting mix of candidates in this year's presidential election in Ireland. Among those in the race: a gay rights campaigner, a former IRA commander and a singer who won the Eurovision song contest back in 1970.

3:00pm

Wed September 28, 2011
NPR Story

Amazon Debuts Its New Tablet

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced Wednesday the release of a full-color tablet device called Fire, as well as three new Kindle E-Ink models starting at $79.

3:00pm

Wed September 28, 2011
Around the Nation

Texas Authorities Find Massive Shark Kill

This past weekend, wildlife officials in Texas came across a huge illegal fishing operation. They found about 3,000 dead sharks, tangled in miles of nets off the coast. Michele Norris talks with Sergeant James Dunks with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department who found the sharks.

3:00pm

Wed September 28, 2011
World

Saudi Woman Sentenced To Lashings After Violating Driving Ban

A group of activists in Saudi Arabia has launched a campaign to overturn a court ruling against a woman who defied the kingdom's ban on driving by women. The woman was sentenced to 10 lashes with a whip after she defied the ban in her home city on the Red Sea Coast. Melissa Block talks with NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson for the details.

3:41pm

Tue September 27, 2011
Monkey See

DVD Picks: 'Ben-Hur'

Warner Home Video

Time for our movie critic Bob Mondello's suggestions for home-viewing. Today he's recommending a wide-screen 1950s epic that was specifically designed to draw people away from their TV sets: Ben-Hur.

Everything about Ben-Hur was big. Reeeeally big. The sound was stereophonic (which was new back then), the screen wider than all outdoors, and that chariot race — flat-out enormous.

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3:40pm

Tue September 27, 2011
Music Reviews

Dan Zanes Plants A 'Little Nut Tree'

Dan Zanes released Little Nut Tree on Sept. 27.
Gala Narezo

When Dan Zanes became a father 16 years ago, he took seriously the decision of which song to play to his newborn daughter first. He chose the 1968 Jamaican hit "Little Nut Tree." Now, after more than a decade of recording music for families, the godfather of the kids' music renaissance has released a new album called Little Nut Tree on his own label.

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4:30pm

Mon September 26, 2011
The Salt

Lemongrass Brings Essential Spark To Southeast Asian Cooking

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 7:06 pm

A freshly tossed Thai lemongrass salad is served on betel leaves at Naj, a Bangkok restaurant
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Imagine you're trekking through the concrete jungle of just about any Southeast Asian city. The first thing you notice is the smorgasbord of smells, some enticing, others downright rank. Amid the urban odor-rama, one sweet herbal fragrance stands out. It's lemongrass. And it's just about everywhere.

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3:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
NPR Story

Saudi Women Get The Vote

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 7:06 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

Over the weekend, King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia announced that women will get the right to vote and to run in municipal elections, but not until 2015. And King Abdullah said women will be appointed to the Shura Council, which advises the monarchy. This in a country where women still don't have the right to drive.

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3:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Space

Ark. Archivist Finds Missing Moon Rock

Last week, an archivist in Arkansas was sifting though boxes of papers from President Bill Clinton's gubernatorial years when he came across a surprise — a piece of the moon. The moon rock had been missing for about 30 years, and it was just one of about 180 moon rocks that are currently at-large. Melissa Block talks with retired senior special agent for NASA Joseph Gutheinz about the other missing rocks.

1:06pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Music Reviews

Wilco's New Album: Love The 'Whole' Thing

Wilco, from left: Mikael Jorgensen, Glenn Kotche, Patrick Sansone, Jeff Tweedy, John Stirratt, Nels Cline.
Zoran Orlic

Usually, the whispers start after rock groups have been around for a while, as die-hard fans begin to worry about their beloved band getting stale. Despite its incredibly long run, Wilco has escaped that fate, and managed to stay fresh since 1994. It just released its eighth studio album in 17 years, and the first issued on Wilco's own dBpm Records label. The Whole Love represents a new peak for the critically acclaimed sextet.

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4:11pm

Sun September 25, 2011
Religion

'Biblical Womanhood': A Year Of Living By The Book

In deference to Titus 2:3-5 and 1 Timothy 5:14, Rachel Held Evans tried to stay "busy in the home," honing her cooking, cleaning and hospitality skills. She is seen here with homemade matzah toffee for Passover.
Dan Evans

As an evangelical Christian, Rachel Held Evans often heard about the importance of practicing "biblical womanhood," but she didn't quite know what that meant. Everyone she asked seemed to have a different definition.

Evans decided to embark on a quest to figure out how to be a woman by the Bible's standards. For one year, she has followed every rule in the Old and New Testaments. Her project will end next Saturday.

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2:50pm

Sun September 25, 2011
Author Interviews

'Awesome Man' Is Super, And Maybe You Are, Too

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 9:50 am

Awesome Man, the creation of author Michael Chabon and illustrator Jake Parker, can shoot positronic rays out of his eyeballs. Click here to read an excerpt of The Astonishing Secret of Awesome Man.
Balzer Bray

Michael Chabon won a Pulitzer Prize for The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay back in 2001. Ten years later, he has a new book out, called The Astonishing Secret of Awesome Man.

This one may sound like a sequel, but Chabon isn't after another Pulitzer. He's looking for ohhhs and ahhhs, hearty giggles and gleeful faces as kids from coast to coast bed down for the night.

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12:39pm

Sun September 25, 2011
Author Interviews

'Skyjack': The Unsolved Case Of D.B. Cooper's Escape

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 11:09 am

A 1971 artist's sketch released by the FBI shows the skyjacker known as "Dan Cooper" and "D.B. Cooper." The sketch was made from the recollections of passengers and crew of a Northwest Orient Airlines jet he hijacked between Portland, Ore., and Seattle.
Anonymous AP

America's only unsolved airline hijacking happened the day before Thanksgiving in 1971. A man boarded a flight to Seattle wearing a dark sports jacket, a clip-on tie and horn-rimmed sunglasses. He took a seat in row 18E, at the very back of the Boeing 727. Almost immediately, he ordered a drink and lit a cigarette.

As the plane began to take off, he passed a note to the flight attendant that read, "Miss, I have a bomb here. I want you to sit by me."

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4:30pm

Sat September 24, 2011
Author Interviews

Drug Trafficking, Corruption At The 'Triple Crossing'

The novel Triple Crossing opens at the San Ysidro crossing in San Diego, where a new border patrol officer named Valentine Pescatore is on duty.

After Pescatore chases down a family of three trying to cross the border, he does something unusual.

"He slips them money," author Sebastian Rotella tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

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3:00pm

Sat September 24, 2011
Arts & Life

Three-Minute Fiction: Time Is Running Out

Short story writers, your time is short! The deadline for this round of our contest Three Minute Fiction is Sunday at 11:59 p.m. Eastern time. The rules set by this round's judge, writer Danielle Evans, are simple: One character must come to town and, one character must leave town. And remember, your story can't longer than 600 words. Enter here.

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2:00pm

Sat September 24, 2011
Music Interviews

Ivy: Speaking The Shared Language Of Pop

Ivy's new album is All Hours. Left to right: Adam Schlesinger, Dominique Durand, Andy Chase.
Courtesy of the artist

In 1989, Dominique Durand left her home in Paris to live in New York. Her goal was simple: to learn English. But fate took over, and five years later she became the frontwoman for the indie pop band Ivy.

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4:51pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Music Interviews

Wild Flag: Making Chaos Useful

Wild Flag's self-titled debut album was released earlier this month. Left to right: Rebecca Cole, Carrie Brownstein, Mary Timony, Janet Weiss.
Courtesy of the artist

Carrie Brownstein helped start Sleater-Kinney, the celebrated punk trio, when she was still in college. That band split in 2006, and though Brownstein kept busy — as a blogger and commentator for NPR Music, among other things — she says that by the end of 2010, she was feeling antsy.

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3:07pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Music Interviews

The Mad Musical Scientist Of Burbank, Calif.

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 11:50 am

Composer and sound designer Diego Stocco at work.
Courtesy of the artist

"I was probably 12 when I trashed my first electric guitar," Diego Stocco says. "I totally disassembled it, and I wasn't able to put it back together."

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3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

NASA: Satellite's Rate Of Descent Has Slowed

We reported on the variables that make it hard to, even at this late date, predict exactly when and where a dead 6-ton NASA satellite will fall to Earth. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, or UARS, will be the biggest NASA spacecraft to crash back to Earth, but it's now baffling scientists as its descent toward Earth slows — delaying its ultimate crash until the early part of the weekend. The space agency is now predicting the satellite will crash down to Earth late Friday or early Saturday, Eastern Time.

3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

Palestinian President Asks U.N. For State Recognition

The president of the Palestinian Authority has asked the U.N. to recognize his state. The Israelis say such a move would violate past agreements and are threatening retaliation. U.S. and European diplomats are scrambling to head off what could be a diplomatic train wreck.

3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

Palestinians React To U.N. Bid For Statehood

Palestinians react to their leader's bid for statehood recognition at the United Nations. Mass rallies are planned across the West Bank. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro.

3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Movies

Movie Reviews: Three Bio-Pics

NPR's Bob Mondello reviews a true-life triple feature: Machine Gun Preacher, Moneyball and Toast, three unlikely stories based on real people.

3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Commentary

Week In Politics: Jobs Bill; Spending Bill; GOP Presidential Race

Michele Norris speaks with our regular political commentators E.J. Dionne, of the Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks, of the New York Times.

3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
From Our Listeners

Letters: Alexander; Boston Red Sox

Melissa Block and Michele Norris read emails from listeners.

3:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Politics

Democrats, Republicans At Odds Over Stopgap Bill

A federal loan program to build more fuel-efficient cars became the latest budget flash point, with House Republicans wanting to raid the fund to help pay for FEMA disaster aid. Senate Democrats refused to go along. The standoff comes in a bill that would fund the entire government beyond next week.

1:53pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Planet Money

Germany's Painful Unemployment Fix

Marchers demonstrate against the German labor reforms, known as Hartz IV. (November 5, 2005)
Sean Gallup Getty Images

As the U.S. and much of Europe struggle to bring down unemployment rates, one country stands apart: Germany, where the unemployment rate is just 6.2 percent.

The story of how Germany got here goes back nearly a decade.

In 2002, Germany looked a lot like the United States does today: it had no economic growth, and its unemployment rate was 8.7 percent and climbing.

Gerhard Schroeder, the German chancellor at the time, made an emergency call to a trusted friend.

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