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A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 5:51 a.m. and 6:51 a.m. each morning.

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And this morning, House Speaker John Boehner has weighed in. He delivered a statement reacting to President Obama's plans to overhaul the country's immigration system. Here's some of what he had to say.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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An independent review board has found fault with the Cuomo administration’s attempts to convert a federal clean water fund loan into construction work for the New York State Thruway’s Tappan Zee Bridge.

On the anniversary of the Great American Smokeout, a leading anti-cancer group says Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration should be spending more to cut back on smoking.

The American Cancer Society’s Michael Burgess says while the Centers for Disease Control recommends New York state spend $200 million annually on tobacco cessation programs, the current state budget has just under $40 million allotted for it. Burgess says in the past, it’s been demonstrated that spending the money on things like a smokers quit line works.

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Device Lets You Experience A Hockey Hit

Nov 21, 2014
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The New  York state attorney general says the Buffalo lake effect snowstorms are more evidence that climate change is happening, and that New York and the nation need to work harder to combat the causes of global warming.

State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says this week in western New York is another example of weather patterns that are changing, and won’t go back to normal by themselves.

CNY Fair Housing

A recent report finds Syracuse and Onondaga County suffer from “hyper-segregation,” where minorities are mostly confined to a few, low-income neighborhoods.

A practice of only placing affordable housing in low-income neighborhoods, combined with the fact that few landlords outside those blocks are willing to accept housing vouchers, has resulted in Syracuse being one of the most segregated cities in the country, according to a report by CNY Fair Housing.

"As long as we keep having this pattern reoccurring for decades and generations, we’re not going to see, really address the difficult issue of the fact that we have one of poorest communities in the country and one of the highest rates of child poverty in the country," said Sally Santangelo, executive director of CNY Fair Housing.

The number of children from Onondaga County who go through the McMahon Ryan Child Advocacy Center in Syracuse is holding steady. Officials say getting the word out about these children who are sexually abused is key to getting that number down.

About 700 kids used the services of McMahon Ryan last year, and most of them knew their abusers, says Executive Director Linda Cleary.

"Almost 45 percent of the children we’ve seen were abused by a parent," Cleary said. "And then another almost 40 percent were abused by someone they know or love.”

How your childhood shapes your eating habits

Nov 21, 2014

When it comes to making choices about what to eat, often people pick food they like over what's good for them. But what makes a meal comfort food is largely determined by cultural factors -- such as geography, ethnicity and socio-economics. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with public health expert Dr. Cynthia Morrow about how culture affects eating habits.

Lorraine Rapp?: How do you think our family background and culture influence the decisions we make regarding food choices?

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All through this morning we're looking at President Obama's immigration speech. Last night the president looked at the camera. He made good on his pledge to bypass Congress and pursue immigration reform by executive action.

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President Obama made his move last night. Today, he heads out to sell it.

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A group of Syracuse University students upset with several issues at the school surrounding student support services and administrative transparency ended an 18 day sit-in protest Thursday afternoon with several victories to claim.

A few dozen students, calling themselves THE General Body, began an occupation of Crouse-Hinds Hall, the administrative building on campus, on Nov. 3.

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State lawmakers say they want to act quickly to spend the state’s growing $5 billion surplus on an infrastructure fund to fix up roads and bridges, among other things. At a think tank sponsored conference on the state’s infrastructure, participants said there are deep needs and they warn lawmakers not to spend the money frivolously.  

Gov. Andrew Cuomo called the devastating lake effect snow that has struck the Buffalo area this week an historic event.

The governor traveled to Buffalo to meet with local officials and see snow removal operations on the New York State Thruway. The Buffalo area found itself buried under nearly six feet of snow, and the storm has been blamed for up to eight deaths in western New York. The snow fell so fast it trapped more than 100 vehicles on the Thruway.

In a Schulyer County courthouse Wednesday night, 16 people were arraigned on trespassing charges for blocking the entrance to a natural gas storage facility. Three refused to pay a $250 fine and were sentenced to 15 days in jail, starting immediately.

The three protesters sentenced to jail include a retired Air Force master sergeant, a prominent scientist, and 86-year-old Roland Micklem, who leaned on his cane and told the judge that "a person’s got to do what a person’s got to do."

The new deal between the Onondaga County Resource Recovery Agency and the company that runs its waste-to-energy plant in Jamesville calls for burning more trash, but OCRRA officials say that isn’t a problem.

OCRRA has agreed to extend its partnership for another 20 years with Covanta Onondaga, the company that’s been running the Jamesville facility since it opened more than two decades ago. The deal requires Onondaga County to come up with 345,000 tons of garbage a year, or pay a penalty. It works out to an average of nine percent more trash than the county produces now.

The costs and overtime hours are starting to add up for Syracuse University as a student sit-in protest nears the end of its third week.

The university's public safety department has had to station multiple officers in Crouse-Hinds Hall, the school's administration building, around the clock since Nov. 3. They're keeping an eye on the dozen or so students living there as part of a protest against the administration of chancellor Kent Syverud.

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Hotel Charges Couple Extra For Bad Review

Nov 20, 2014
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Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Residents Wait To See If Ferguson Commission Succeeds

Nov 20, 2014
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A big aim of Japan's effort to revive the economy is to get consumers to start buying again. Consumers are spending a little more, but apparently not enough. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Tokyo.

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Officials in Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties issued travel warnings yesterday as lake effect snow created potentially dangerous conditions.

But a few workers in Watertown were out in the storm. City bus driver Matthew Muñoz shoveled snow at the bus stop in front of the Woolworth building. He didn't seem phased.

"I think it's annoying," Muñoz said. "Typical Watertown weather. But I'm sure it'll go down, and then come back again and go down and come back again."

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