Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne, Steve Inskeep and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 5:51 a.m. and 6:51 a.m. each morning.

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3:25am

Wed December 26, 2012
Law

Wall Street Wiretaps: Investigators Use Insiders' Own Words To Convict Them

Originally published on Wed December 26, 2012 6:07 am

Raj Rajaratnam, center, billionaire co-founder of Galleon Group, is surrounded by photographers as leaves Manhattan federal court May 11 after being convicted of insider trading charges.
Mary Altaffer AP

It was another busy year for federal authorities pursuing insider trading cases. Seventy-five people have now been charged in the last three years, and investigators say that success comes largely from their decision to attack insider trading the way they take down the Mafia and drug cartels — with tools such as wiretaps, informants and cooperators.

The story behind how the government decided to go after insider trading as hard as it goes after the mob is really just a story about dead ends.

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3:23am

Wed December 26, 2012
All Tech Considered

Who Could Be Watching You Watching Your Figure? Your Boss

Originally published on Wed December 26, 2012 2:28 pm

Mobile apps and devices track a user's health statistics. But those data are sometimes sold and can end up in the hands of employers and insurance companies.
iStockphoto.com

Those of us trying to lose some pounds after overindulging this holiday season can get help from a slew of smartphone apps that count steps climbed and calories burned. Self-tracking has also become a way for companies to make money using your fitness data. And some experts worry that the data collected could be used against users in the long run.

At a recent Quantified Self Meetup in downtown San Francisco, technology lovers are testing homemade do-it-yourself devices on people eager to measure their mind and body.

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3:22am

Wed December 26, 2012
The Salt

Don't Fear That Expired Food

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 8:57 am

The expiration date on foods like orange juice and even milk aren't indicators of when those products will go bad.
iStockphoto.com

Now that the Christmas feast is over, you may be looking at all the extra food you made, or the food that you brought home from the store that never even got opened.

And you may be wondering: How long can I keep this? What if it's past its expiration date? Who even comes up with those dates on food, anyway, and what do they mean?

Here's the short answer: Those "sell by" dates are there to protect the reputation of the food. They have very little to do with food safety. If you're worried whether food is still OK to eat, just smell it.

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2:14am

Wed December 26, 2012
The Salt

The Rebirth Of Rye Whiskey And Nostalgia For 'The Good Stuff'

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 11:04 am

Templeton bottles, filled and almost corked.
Noah Adams NPR

It used to be said that only old men drink rye, sitting alone down at the end of the bar, but that's no longer the case as bartenders and patrons set aside the gins and the vodkas and rediscover the pleasures of one of America's old-fashioned favorites.

Whiskey from rye grain was what most distilleries made before Prohibition. Then, after repeal in 1933, bourbon, made from corn, became more popular. Corn was easier to grow, and the taste was sweeter.

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2:12am

Wed December 26, 2012
Best Music Of 2012

Top 10 Top 40 Of 2012

Originally published on Wed December 26, 2012 7:51 am

Ellie Goulding
Courtesy of the artist

2:12am

Wed December 26, 2012
Music Interviews

Perfume Genius: A 'Creepy, Beautiful Mix'

Originally published on Wed December 26, 2012 6:07 am

Perfume Genius.
Angel Ceballos Courtesy of the artist

Mike Hadreas describes the sound of Perfume Genius as "that kind of creepy, beautiful mix of things — that warm wash of something that is beautiful, but unsettling at the same time."

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7:27am

Tue December 25, 2012
Around the Nation

Is Santa's Sleigh Powered By Caribou?

Originally published on Tue December 25, 2012 9:42 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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7:19am

Tue December 25, 2012
Around the Nation

Santa Amazes Deaf Boy's Mother

Originally published on Tue December 25, 2012 9:42 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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4:41am

Tue December 25, 2012
Africa

U.S. Military Builds Up Its Presence In Africa

Originally published on Wed December 26, 2012 7:22 am

Gen. Carter Ham is head of the U.S. African command. An Army brigade from Fort Riley, Kan., will begin helping train African militaries beat back a growing terrorist threat posed by al-Qaida.
AP

An Army brigade from Fort Riley, Kan., some 4,000, soldiers, will begin helping to train African militaries. The idea is to help African troops beat back a growing terrorist threat posed by al-Qaida.

The American troops will head over in small teams over the course of the next year. The Dagger Brigade returned to Kansas last year from a deployment to Iraq, where it trained and advised that country's security forces.

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4:14am

Tue December 25, 2012
Middle East

Dig Finds Evidence Of Pre-Jesus Bethlehem

Originally published on Wed December 26, 2012 7:13 am

The Israel Antiquities Authority says archeologists have found the oldest artifact that bears the inscription of Bethlehem, a 2,700-year-old clay seal with the name of Jesus' traditional birthplace.
AP

Thousands of Christian pilgrims streamed into Bethlehem Monday night to celebrate the birth of Jesus. It's the major event of the year in that West Bank town. But Israeli archaeologists now say there is strong evidence that Christ was born in a different Bethlehem, a small village in the Galilee.

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4:04am

Tue December 25, 2012
U.S.

In Pursuit of Recognition: An Undocumented Immigrant's Resilient Fight

Originally published on Tue December 25, 2012 9:42 am

Sofia Campos, 23, is the head of the United We Dream campaign — a national network of youth-led immigrant organizations. Campos was born in Peru, but grew up in California, entirely unaware of her undocumented status until she tried applying for college scholarships.
Courtesy of Sofia Campos

Unlike many undocumented immigrants, Sofia Campos is not afraid to give her real name.

"It's deliberate, and it's liberating," she says. "It's kind of a shock to hear somebody say, 'I am undocumented' or wear the 'I am undocumented' T-shirt, just in your face."

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4:03am

Tue December 25, 2012
Economy

Back To The Economy Of The '90s? Not So Fast

Originally published on Tue December 25, 2012 9:42 am

A lone employee oversees Hewlett-Packard workstations being assembled at a plant on Jan. 1, 1993. Huge improvements in computer technology propelled the economy during that decade.
Ovak Arslanian Time

Throughout the debate over taxes and the "fiscal cliff," there's been a lot of looking backward — to the 1990s. The economic expansion of the 1990s was the longest in recorded American history.

Democrats say the economy thrived under the leadership of President Bill Clinton, including his tax rate increase on high earners. Republicans say government didn't spend as much then and that growth didn't really take off until the GOP took control of Congress in 1995.

So what actually happened in the '90s? What made them tick?

A Unique Boom

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3:03pm

Mon December 24, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

Whatever Happened To The Classical Christmas Album?

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 2:38 pm

A sampling of one listener's cherished classical Christmas albums from a few years back.
Mito Habe-Evans NPR

9:27am

Mon December 24, 2012
Arts

Area teenager's voice takes him to New York City

Alex Ottaviano

Fans of the Great American Song Book -- music first made popular by singers like Frank Sinatra, Mel Torme, and Ella Fitzgerald -- can thank singer Michael Feinstein for keeping the flame alive. His nightclub in New York City is a mecca for enthusiasts. Now, a local teen singing phenom is getting into the act. Sixteen-year-old Nick Ziobro from Fayetteville is currently the opening act for Feinstein's holiday show.

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8:14am

Mon December 24, 2012
Regional Coverage

Wurlitzer organ one of Syracuse's landmarks

Empire Theater

The New York State Fairgrounds in Syracuse has been an institution in the area for years. But many people don't know about another landmark housed on the grounds – an authentic Wurlitzer organ.

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7:38am

Mon December 24, 2012
Around the Nation

Santa Suits Are Getting Bigger

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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7:33am

Mon December 24, 2012
Around the Nation

Ill. Chef To Make Gigantic Green Bean Casserole

Mark Shoopman is into green beans. The Illinois chef is cooking 270 pounds of beans and 75 pounds of onions. His goal, according to WMBD in Peoria, is the largest green bean casserole in Central Illinois.

7:00am

Mon December 24, 2012
Regional Coverage

New database makes Fort Drum's historic cemeteries more accessible

Michael Sprowles, of Fort Drum's cultural resources office, checks a new map to locate grave sites at Sheepfold Cemetery on Fort Drum.
Joanna Richards WRVO

With the outbreak of World War Two, the Army installation then known as Pine Camp expanded, to become Camp Drum and eventually Fort Drum today. In the process, it swallowed up several villages, including their cemeteries.  Fort Drum researchers have created a database and new maps that will help family members of those buried at the cemeteries to find and visit their loved ones' gravesites, both in person and online.

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6:41am

Mon December 24, 2012
Europe

In Cornwall, Lisa Simpson Rivals Queen Elizabeth

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, while our politicians are consumed with the deficit deadline, many leaders around the world are taking a step back, putting quill to paper and carefully composing their Christmas messages. In Britain, particular attention will be paid to Queen Elizabeth's message, because this year she's celebrating 60 years on the throne.

NPR's Philip Reeves sent this letter, musing about what it meant to be British as 2012 comes to a close.

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6:30am

Mon December 24, 2012
Around the Nation

Gun Ownership Is A 'Responsiblity To Be Proud Of'

Following the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut, the debate over gun control has been reignited. Many have said that if there is going to be any action on gun control, law-abiding, responsible gun owners will need to be a part of the conversation. Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep talks to Steven Rinella, a writer and avid hunter, about how he views the current debate.

6:19am

Mon December 24, 2012
NPR Story

Time To Address 'Fiscal Cliff' Narrows

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 7:27 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

It is Christmas Eve, a time for good will towards all, for peace on Earth, for setting aside differences. Well, maybe that's not true for everyone this year. On Friday, Congress went home without settling their differences over how to avoid the spending decreases and tax increases known as the fiscal cliff.

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6:19am

Mon December 24, 2012
NPR Story

Syria Airstrike Update

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 7:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

International envoy Lakhdar Brahimi met with Syrian leaders today hoping to solve that country's bloody conflict, but the bloodshed goes on. There are reports of explosions in Damascus today, government forces are battling rebel fighters, and civilians continue to perish in large numbers. The relentless violence, including an airstrike yesterday on a bakery, is draining hope for any diplomatic solution. NPR's Peter Kenyon filed this report from Istanbul.

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6:19am

Mon December 24, 2012
NPR Story

Indians Demonstrate Against Gang Rape

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 6:45 am

Police in the Indian capital New Delhi had to break up a second day of protests Sunday. Hundreds of people were demonstrating against the gang rape and beating of a 23-year-old student on a bus.

3:21am

Mon December 24, 2012
Shots - Health News

Chance To Pause Biological Clock With Ovarian Transplant Stirs Debate

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 9:34 pm

Sherman Silber, a surgeon at the Infertility Center of St. Louis, offers women a procedure that he claims will put their biological clocks on ice.
Courtesy of Infertility Center of St. Louis

When Sarah Gardner was 34, she started getting really worried about whether she'd ever have kids.

"I bought this kit online that said that they could tell you your ovarian reserve," Gardner, now 40, says. These kits claim they can tell women how long their ovaries will continue producing eggs and how much time they have left to get pregnant.

"Well, mine said, 'we advise really you have a baby now.' Well, sadly that letter arrived three weeks after I just split up with my long-term partner. So, yeah, it opened a massive can of worms really," she says.

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3:20am

Mon December 24, 2012
Shots - Health News

Like Girls, Boys Are Entering Puberty Earlier

Originally published on Wed December 26, 2012 11:23 am

According to a study published in Pediatrics, boys are entering puberty six months to two years earlier than they did in past studies.
iStockphoto.com

It's been known for a while that girls start puberty earlier than they did in the past, sometimes as young as 7 or 8. But it's been unclear whether boys also go through puberty earlier. Now, a study from the American Academy of Pediatrics helps answer that question.

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3:18am

Mon December 24, 2012
The Salt

At Christmas, A Roman Holiday Revolves Around The Food

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 11:05 am

Christmas chocolate and sweets on display at a Christmas market at Piazza Navona on Dec. 20 in Rome.
Alberto Pizzoli AFP/Getty Images

The city of Rome may be the seat of the Roman Catholic Church, but as far as bright, glitzy decorations, Christmas there has always been a rather sober affair.

And yet at Christmastime, there's one area where Romans pull out all the stops — the dinner table.

Even with the economic crisis, outdoor markets, grocery shops and fishmongers are crowded with customers.

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3:17am

Mon December 24, 2012
NPR's Holiday Favorites

David Sedaris Reads From His 'Santaland Diaries'

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 6:30 am

iStockphoto.com

You might not expect "Santa's Helper" to be a career-altering gig, but for David Sedaris, it changed everything. The writer and humorist spent a season working at Macy's as a department store elf. He described his short tenure as Crumpet the Elf in "The Santaland Diaries," an essay that he read on Morning Edition in 1992.

Instantly, a classic was born. Sedaris' reading has become an NPR holiday tradition. Click the "Listen" link above to hear Sedaris read his tale.

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3:16am

Mon December 24, 2012
Shootings In Newtown, Conn.

Toy Donations Pour Into Newtown For The Holidays

Originally published on Mon December 24, 2012 1:48 pm

Christmas stockings with the names of shooting victims hang from a railing in the Sandy Hook village of Newtown, Conn.
Julio Cortez AP

The Monday after the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., toys and stuffed animals began arriving by the truckload. Ten days later, the gymnasium at Edmond Town Hall in the center of Newtown is full of them.

"When I realized that it was getting so large, I thought that we should get this to the children before the holidays," says Ann Benore, a caseworker for Newtown Social Services.

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11:16am

Fri December 21, 2012
Politics

Sen. Kerry Gets Obama's Nod For Secretary Of State

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. This afternoon, President Obama is set to nominate Massachusetts Senator John Kerry as the nation's next secretary of state. Kerry would replace Hillary Clinton, who's planning to leave that post after four years as the president's globe-trotting emissary. Joining us to talk about the move is NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley; and NPR's diplomatic correspondent Michele Kelemen, who's here in the studio with me.

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10:48am

Fri December 21, 2012
Politics

Boehner Answers Questions About Withdrawing 'Plan B'

Originally published on Fri December 21, 2012 11:16 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Action last night in the U.S. House of Representatives suggests just how hard it could be to pass a solution to the tax increases and spending cuts due at the end of the year.

INSKEEP: House Speaker John Boehner has yet to reach a deal with President Obama so he sought to put his own plan before the House last night.

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