Public Radio Presents

Sundays 7 p.m.

Public Radio Presents is a rotating collection of some of the best productions in public radio. Any given Sunday you'll hear debates, storytelling, historical programming, panel discussions, documentaries, and more. Past programs have included: Intelligence Squared US, America Abroad, State of the Re:Union, Destination DIY, Here's the Thing with Alec Baldwin, and locally produced documentaries and panel discussions.

Have a suggestion for this rotating block? Let us know.

Andrew Houser / Flickr

This week, on "Re:sound," we'll turn down the thermostat and usher in stories that gives us the chills. This Sunday you'll hear:

I Fell Through the Ice by Dennis Funk and Gwen Macsai (Re:sound debut, 2016)

Phil Smith grew up skating on frozen lakes. But one New Year's Eve, reliving his childhood memories put him in a life and death situation.

Overland by Nate DiMeo (The Memory Palace , 2016)

Join us this Sunday for a special hour of Re:sound, in which the team shares their favorite entires to the 2016 ShortDocs Challenge.

This show features the entries, as well as interviews with producers, a visit to Manual Cinema -- who are adapting the winning ShortDoc into a live shadow puppetry performance -- and more.

Tune in this Sunday, June 18 at 7 p.m. for this episode of Re:sound. If you missed it on-air, you can hear it online.

martin_vmorris / Flickr

Join us as "Re:sound" returns to the airwaves in June and July. This week we're going on three “soundwalks” that meander at the pace of real life.

First, the 4700 block of Liberty Heights Avenue is a portrait of survival and adaptability. It's a self-governed, informal economy where the currency is respect. Space is shared by merchants, churches, longtime residents, and drug dealers. Immigrants from Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, West Africa, and Korea have set up shops alongside a dwindling number of African American-owned businesses. Trust is earned here, not given lightly.

Join us this Sunday for a one-hour special with "All Things Considered" host Kelly McEvers. In-depth reporting from the "Embedded" podcast will investigate videos of police encounters and how the proliferation of this kind of video has affected life in America.

Note: This hour contains graphic and sensitive subject matter and may not be appropriate for young children. Please read the summary that follows to determine if these are topics are something you'd be comfortable with younger listeners hearing.

"We Knew JFK" is an hour-long radio documentary on the life of John F. Kennedy, told in oral history form, through the first-person recollections of those who knew him. The program is constructed from a remarkable collection of audio interviews, recorded half a century ago and archived at the Kennedy Library in Boston, where they have gone largely unheard by the general public.

Join us this Sunday for the next "Intelligence Squared U.S." debate. This time, we take a look at the charter school.

In the 25 years since Minnesota passed the first charter school law, these publicly funded but privately operated schools have become a highly sought-after alternative to traditional public education, particularly for underserved students in urban areas. Between 2004 and 2014 alone, charter school enrollment increased from less than 1 million to 2.5 million students.

Exodus '47

May 9, 2017

From Inside Out Documentaries, "Exodus '47" is the story of three men who served aboard the Exodus 1947, a Jewish refugee ship that tried to run thousands of holocaust survivors past the British blockade of Palestine in 1947.

You'll hear from three men who experienced that journey: Bill Millman, Frank Lavine and Nat Nadler. Before there was an Israel, these men (and nearly 40 others) climbed aboard a rusted American ferryboat and set out from Philadelphia to transport thousands of Jewish holocaust survivors.

Join WRVO for journeys to freedom, on two legs and four:

Ten years ago, more than 50 pit bulls were discovered at a dog fighting ring in Virginia. Most people thought they couldn't be saved. But their stories had just begun.

And 150 years ago, two girls crossed the Missouri River trying to escape a life of slavery.

In the summer of 2016, a high school teacher and his students set out on a 500-mile journey to follow in their footsteps.

"The Response: America's Story" seeks listeners' unique stories about they lives they lead, and their hopes for the next four years. The series offers Americans a chance to share their realities and reflections with the world.

The fourth segment of the series asks "How has the first 100 days of the Trump presidency affected you?" We hear Americans' answers on Sunday, April 30 at 7 p.m.

The principal recommendation of the final report of the Consensus Commission on Local Government Modernization is to establish a new municipal form of government for Onondaga County, with a single executive and a 33-seat legislature. While public forums and town hall meetings have been held to discuss the report, and the proposal has been both criticized and defended in the media, missing is a direct exchange between opposing views, with opportunities for challenge and rebuttal.

Donlelel / Google Images

The principal recommendation of the Final Report of the Consensus Commission on Local Government Modernization is to establish a new municipal form of government for Onondaga County, with a single executive and a 33-seat legislature.

Thirsty Planet

Apr 12, 2017
Stephen Smith / APM Reports

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel.

Over 70 years ago, in 1945, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and King Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia met onboard he USS Quincy. A close relationship between the two countries has been maintained ever since, with oil and military and intelligence cooperation at its foundation. But the 9/11 attacks, the U.S. shale revolution, human rights concerns, and diverging interests in the Middle East have all put strains on this relationship.

Has this special relationship outlived its usefulness or is it too important to walk away from? Hear the debate on WRVO.

Bev Sykes / Flickr

For National Poetry Month, WRVO is bringing you "Hearing Voices: Wordshakers."

An hour-long program full of poetry, this special features "The Charge of the Light Brigade," Walt Whitman's "America," found poems and more. Tune in this Sunday, April 2 at 7 p.m. for our kick-off of National Poetry Month.

Missed the program live? You can listen online, any time.

From "The Response: America's Story," we bring you a program about immigration, one of President Trump's signature issues.

Marion S. Trikosko / Library of Congress

Award-winning playwright Marcus Gardley's latest play is titled "X." It tells the story of the assassination of Malcolm X, both the story we think we know, and the details seldom shared. Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" provides the framework for Gardley to deepen our understanding of this complex, compelling figure in the tumultuous era of the 1960s.  

In 2014, the shooting of Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri, set off a wave of protests and sparked a movement targeting racial disparities in criminal justice. Since then, there have been other controversial deaths of African Americans at the hands of law enforcement that have captured the public’s attention, from Tamir Rice, to Philando Castile.

This BBC and APM co-production, "The Response - America's Story" seeks listeners' unique stories about the lives they lead and their hopes for the next four years. Americans can tell their realities and reflections of the world, using the technology in their pockets.

In this special broadcast, Sunday, March 5 at 7 p.m., Americans tell their experience of health. Hosted by the BBC's Shaimaa Khalil, this episode presents diverse voices reflecting on human realities of health -- a major focus of the Trump administration's first 100 days. 

The story of two more cases the Stearns County Sheriff's Department had trouble solving, and a man whose life was ruined when he was wrongly suspected of killing a police officer. It includes data showing a shockingly low clearance rate for major crimes not just in Stearns County but in many other places around the country. Afterward, the team of reporters discuss why there is no authority that can put pressure on local law enforcement to do a better job of solving crimes.

The story of how investigators zeroed in on the wrong guy, ruining his life by naming him a "person of interest." Plus, discussion of the term "person of interest" and interviews with experts about why the term is gaining currency and what it means.

About the series

This program contains material that some listeners may find disturbing.

This program contains material that some listeners may find disturbing.

This program details further mistakes of the investigators in the Jacob Wetterling disappearance, showing that law enforcement failed to canvass the neighborhood and missed key witnesses. This weeks' discussion: the overwhelming number of leads that Jacob's family and law enforcement received, and the killer's recent confession.

It is alleged that the practice of gerrymandering -- dividing election districts into units to favor a particular group -- subverts democracy by making congressional districts “safe” for one party or the other. As a result, only those voting in primaries are in effect choosing our representatives.

Join us for two consecutive weekends in January for the best of the 2016 Third Coast Festival on WRVO. 

Back with their "Best of the Best" broadcast, Third Coast features winners of the annual documentary competition. From more than 500 entries, 10 were chosen as winners. Meticulously crafted and lovingly produced, these stories will intrigue, inform and insire.

This year's program features powerful, important stories dealing with issues that might not be suitable for young listeners.

This New Year's Day, celebrate our country by helping the Capitol Steps make fun of it. You don't need to win the Electoral College to proclaim laughter is exactly what 2017 needs. Tune in for the Year in Review from "The Capitol Steps" this Sunday, January 1 at 7 p.m. on WRVO.

Let's not let the election divide us any further -- unite in laughter!

Listen online anytime.

'16 Going on '17

Dec 20, 2016
Dafne Cholet / Flickr

The unexpected, unusual, often positive, even life-changing events of our past year... surounded by the voices and music we may have heard, or never heard before.

Tune in Sunday, December 25 at 7 p.m. on WRVO for a summary of the unusual events in 2016 daily life, business, transportation, science, outer space, show business, the outdoors and unique things not classified as "Breaking News."

Loaded with pop, movie, TV, and Broadway music of today and yesterday -- including The Eagles, Bob Dylan, "Hamilton," David Bowie, Taylor Swift and more.

A Christmas Carol: REDUX

Dec 12, 2016

"A Christmas Carol: REDUX" tells the Charles Dickens classic in the present day, giving it satirical comedic spin. Amidst a crumbling economy, skyrocketing unemployment, and mass protests on Wall Street, a cheapskate Scrooge refuses to share his wealth with those less fortunate.

It's the classic Christmas tale with visits by the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future.

Tune in this Sunday, December 18 at 7 p.m. on WRVO.

Missed the broadcast? You can hear it online.

Alt 50s Christmas

Dec 6, 2016

Christmas in the 1950s was the stomping ground for Rudolph and Frosty, but underneath the marshmallow world of perfect conformity was another take on holiday cheer that involved rock 'n' roll, space travel, my baby left me blues and good old Cold War paranoia.

It's Alt 50s Christmas -- edgier than Perry Como, more corrupt than a rigged quiz show -- something to sing while you dig your fallout shelter.

Join us for this special on Sunday, December 11 at 7 p.m. Can't catch it live on WRVO? You can listen online.

College Choice: The Value of It All

Nov 30, 2016
Elissa Nadworny / NPR

A special from NPR News, "College Choice: The Value of It All" follows nine college seniors. NPR's Robert Siegel spent more than a year checking in with the students, talking with them about their choice of school and how things turned out.

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