Public Radio Presents

Sundays 7 p.m.

Public Radio Presents is a rotating collection of some of the best productions in public radio. Any given Sunday you'll hear debates, storytelling, historical programming, panel discussions, documentaries, and more. Past programs have included: Intelligence Squared US, America Abroad, State of the Re:Union, Destination DIY, Here's the Thing with Alec Baldwin, and locally produced documentaries and panel discussions.

Have a suggestion for this rotating block? Let us know.

Timothy K Hamilton / Flickr

Enjoy this hour of mixes and mashes and season samples and songs.

First, Christmas at Bagram Air Base hospital in Afghanistan, a tour of the Holy Land with Hanukkah military history, a visit to a toy store and some musical Chrismashups.

Tune in this Sunday, December 17 at 7 p.m. on WRVO. If you missed the on-air broadcast, you can still listen online.

Shelby U / Flickr

Join us for an hour of rarely-heard holiday music highlighting artists, arrangements, lyrics and compositions from today and yesterday.

Hear John Denver with "Christmas Like a Lullaby," Mannheim Steamroller with "Carol of the Birds," and much more, from the classical to the modern. A full list of songs featured on "An Unfamiliar Christmas" is available online.

Tune in this Sunday, December 10 at 7 p.m. on WRVO for "An Unfamiliar Christmas."

Join us for an NPR News special this weekend exploring the latest sexual harassment allegations and admissions.

It's been a little more than a year since President Trump, then candidate-Trump, faces furious criticism over the now infamous Access Hollywood video featuring his comments about groping women. He subsequently faced a barrage of sexual harassment claims. While the moment sparked a national conversation about sexual harassment, it did not quash his Presidential aspirations.

This history special traces the development of racial, and racist, ideas. We’ll start in the ancient world, when "there was no notion of race," as historian Nell Irvin Painter puts it, and continue to the founding of the United States as, fundamentally, a nation of and for white people.

LBJ's War

Nov 8, 2017
PRI

Through secretly taped phone calls and archival interviews, most unheard until now, this program tells the story of LBJ's fall from grace in the voices of those who were there when this history was made and who had a hand in its making.

This year, SUNY Oswego's Lewis B. O'Donnell Media Summit took on "fake news." The summit is a cooperative effort of the college's communication and broadcasting community -- both faculty and students. Part of a broader set of activities to give SUNY Oswego students access to alumni and other professionals in media, the summit features four panelists and one moderator.

The panel, of White House and other broadcast news industry veterans, spoke on the politically and emotionally charged subject of "fake news." This year's panelists included media professionals on the national scene -- all with past local connections -- as well as a local talk radio host and a SUNY Oswego alumna.

This month, we take a up-close look at the Supreme Court.  How does an elite group of nine people shape everything from marriage and money, to safety and sex for an entire nation? A spinoff series from "Radiolab," "More Perfect" dives into the rarefied world of the Supreme Court to explain how cases deliberated inside hallowed halls affect lives far away from the bench.

Emily Hanford

One in five American children has a hard time learning to read. Many of these kids have dyslexia. There are proven ways to help people with dyslexia learn, and a federal law that's supposed to ensure schools provide kids with help. But across the country, public schools are denying children proper treatment and often failing to identify them with dyslexia in the first place.

This APM Reports documentary investigates why, and explores how improving things for dyslexic kids could help all students learn to read better.

Ellender Memorial Library, Nicholls State University

A growing number of colleges and universities in the eastern United States are confronting their historic ties to the slave trade. Profits from slavery and related industries helped build some of the most prestigious schools in New England. In many southern states, enslaved people built and maintained college campuses.

Andy Vasoyan / APM Reports

This weekend, WRVO continues our series of education documentaries from American Public Media. This week: the issues undocumented students face when they try to continue their education.

U.S. public schools must treat undocumented students like citizens. But once these students graduate, everything changes. Without papers, they don't qualify for federal college grants, they can't legally work to pay for tuition, and they may have to pay out-of-state tuition.

Emily Hanford / APM Reports

This weekend, WRVO begins a series of four education documentaries from American Public Media. This week, in the first episode: understanding the issue of getting good teachers and, more importantly, keeping them.

There may be nothing more important in the educational life of a child than having effective teachers, but U.S. schools are struggling to attract and keep them. The problem is most acute in rural areas, where kids may learn math from a social studies teacher. In urban schools, those most likely to leave are black men, who make up just 2 percent of teachers.

Masters of Scale

Jul 25, 2017

Hosted by LinkedIn co-founder and investor Reid Hoffman, "Masters of Scale" is an original series in which Hoffman tests his theories about how companies grow from zero to a gazillion. In conversation with famous founders, Hoffman connects the dots between fascinating disparate stories with the aim of illuminating big concepts and simple hacks that can change everything.

Hear these episodes through the end of August on WRVO.

IQ2US

Imagine getting a check from the government every month. $600 guaranteed. It’s happening in Finland, where a pilot program is being launched to test what’s known as a “universal basic income.” This week, we debate that reality.

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope / Flickr

This week on "Re:sound," stories of those who share and those who creep in the shadows. You'll hear:

The Mollusc and the Peacock by Natalie Kestecher (Short Cuts, BBC Radio 4, 2014)

This is the story of a Facebook lurker, someone who sees herself as curious but benign. Like her grandmother, who was a fan of American soap operas, she has a taste for stories about the lives of others just as long as they’re glamorous and extravagant and don’t bear too much resemblance to reality.

Voyager Found by Jonathan Mitchell (The Truth, 2014)

Fredrik Rubensson / Flickr

This week on "Re:sound," from the Third Coast Audio Festival, two stories of love through loss. We'll also enjoy an interview with the producers who've written their way through these troubled moments. Tune in for:

The Updates by Sophie Townsend with Sound Engineer Louis Mitchell. (360documentaries, ABC RN 2014)

Jon Fife / Flickr

This week on "Re:sound," heard Sunday nights on WRVO, uninvited guests like old lovers, irrational fears and the annoying habits that keep us up at night. You'll hear:

Like Steps Of Passing Ghosts by Kaitlin Prest (a Falling Tree Production for The Essay, BBC Radio 3, 2015)

Kaitlin Prest explores how we can remain haunted by past loves 'Like Steps of Passing Ghosts.'

Holdout by Katie Mingle and Roman Mars (99% Invisible, 2014)

A woman watches while a shopping mall goes up all around her.

Andrew Houser / Flickr

This week, on "Re:sound," we'll turn down the thermostat and usher in stories that gives us the chills. This Sunday you'll hear:

I Fell Through the Ice by Dennis Funk and Gwen Macsai (Re:sound debut, 2016)

Phil Smith grew up skating on frozen lakes. But one New Year's Eve, reliving his childhood memories put him in a life and death situation.

Overland by Nate DiMeo (The Memory Palace , 2016)

Join us this Sunday for a special hour of Re:sound, in which the team shares their favorite entires to the 2016 ShortDocs Challenge.

This show features the entries, as well as interviews with producers, a visit to Manual Cinema -- who are adapting the winning ShortDoc into a live shadow puppetry performance -- and more.

Tune in this Sunday, June 18 at 7 p.m. for this episode of Re:sound. If you missed it on-air, you can hear it online.

martin_vmorris / Flickr

Join us as "Re:sound" returns to the airwaves in June and July. This week we're going on three “soundwalks” that meander at the pace of real life.

First, the 4700 block of Liberty Heights Avenue is a portrait of survival and adaptability. It's a self-governed, informal economy where the currency is respect. Space is shared by merchants, churches, longtime residents, and drug dealers. Immigrants from Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, West Africa, and Korea have set up shops alongside a dwindling number of African American-owned businesses. Trust is earned here, not given lightly.

Join us this Sunday for a one-hour special with "All Things Considered" host Kelly McEvers. In-depth reporting from the "Embedded" podcast will investigate videos of police encounters and how the proliferation of this kind of video has affected life in America.

Note: This hour contains graphic and sensitive subject matter and may not be appropriate for young children. Please read the summary that follows to determine if these are topics are something you'd be comfortable with younger listeners hearing.

"We Knew JFK" is an hour-long radio documentary on the life of John F. Kennedy, told in oral history form, through the first-person recollections of those who knew him. The program is constructed from a remarkable collection of audio interviews, recorded half a century ago and archived at the Kennedy Library in Boston, where they have gone largely unheard by the general public.

Join us this Sunday for the next "Intelligence Squared U.S." debate. This time, we take a look at the charter school.

In the 25 years since Minnesota passed the first charter school law, these publicly funded but privately operated schools have become a highly sought-after alternative to traditional public education, particularly for underserved students in urban areas. Between 2004 and 2014 alone, charter school enrollment increased from less than 1 million to 2.5 million students.

Exodus '47

May 9, 2017

From Inside Out Documentaries, "Exodus '47" is the story of three men who served aboard the Exodus 1947, a Jewish refugee ship that tried to run thousands of holocaust survivors past the British blockade of Palestine in 1947.

You'll hear from three men who experienced that journey: Bill Millman, Frank Lavine and Nat Nadler. Before there was an Israel, these men (and nearly 40 others) climbed aboard a rusted American ferryboat and set out from Philadelphia to transport thousands of Jewish holocaust survivors.

Join WRVO for journeys to freedom, on two legs and four:

Ten years ago, more than 50 pit bulls were discovered at a dog fighting ring in Virginia. Most people thought they couldn't be saved. But their stories had just begun.

And 150 years ago, two girls crossed the Missouri River trying to escape a life of slavery.

In the summer of 2016, a high school teacher and his students set out on a 500-mile journey to follow in their footsteps.

"The Response: America's Story" seeks listeners' unique stories about they lives they lead, and their hopes for the next four years. The series offers Americans a chance to share their realities and reflections with the world.

The fourth segment of the series asks "How has the first 100 days of the Trump presidency affected you?" We hear Americans' answers on Sunday, April 30 at 7 p.m.

The principal recommendation of the final report of the Consensus Commission on Local Government Modernization is to establish a new municipal form of government for Onondaga County, with a single executive and a 33-seat legislature. While public forums and town hall meetings have been held to discuss the report, and the proposal has been both criticized and defended in the media, missing is a direct exchange between opposing views, with opportunities for challenge and rebuttal.

Donlelel / Google Images

The principal recommendation of the Final Report of the Consensus Commission on Local Government Modernization is to establish a new municipal form of government for Onondaga County, with a single executive and a 33-seat legislature.

Thirsty Planet

Apr 12, 2017
Stephen Smith / APM Reports

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel.

Over 70 years ago, in 1945, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and King Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia met onboard he USS Quincy. A close relationship between the two countries has been maintained ever since, with oil and military and intelligence cooperation at its foundation. But the 9/11 attacks, the U.S. shale revolution, human rights concerns, and diverging interests in the Middle East have all put strains on this relationship.

Has this special relationship outlived its usefulness or is it too important to walk away from? Hear the debate on WRVO.

Bev Sykes / Flickr

For National Poetry Month, WRVO is bringing you "Hearing Voices: Wordshakers."

An hour-long program full of poetry, this special features "The Charge of the Light Brigade," Walt Whitman's "America," found poems and more. Tune in this Sunday, April 2 at 7 p.m. for our kick-off of National Poetry Month.

Missed the program live? You can listen online, any time.

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