Take Care

Sunday evenings at 6:30 pm

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email both Linda, Lorraine and the show producers at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

WRVO allows republishing of Take Care web posts at no charge, with the following provisions:  a) no editing of scripts, graphics or audio is allowed;  b) "WRVO Public Media" shall be credited on the republished post; and c) notification of intent to republish a post is emailed to TakeCare@wrvo.org.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

How to survive the wilderness

Jul 26, 2015
Al_HikesAZ / Flickr

Lost in the wilderness, people tend to make things worse for themselves by trying to find their way out, or looking aimlessly for food. Yet staying calm and staying put might guarantee your safety faster than anything else.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Christopher McStay, chief of clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. McStay was also the former chief of service for the Bellevue Hospital Emergency Department in New York City, where he treated patients who have survived extreme circumstances such as Hurricane Irene and Superstorm Sandy.

The reality of contact lenses

Jul 26, 2015
Andy Simmons / Flickr

Contact lenses have become a cultural norm as more and more people make the switch from glasses to contacts. But are people using these lenses correctly, and do they know exactly how these lenses even work?

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to contact lens expert Dr. Bryan Lee, a cornea, cataract and Lasik specialist, whose practice is located in Los Altos, California. Lee is also a member of the Council of American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Hiking in the woods and mountains is a popular activity. But if you take the wrong fork in the trail and get lost, a day of recreation can turn into an exercise in staying safe. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak to Dr. Christopher McStay, chief of clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the University of Colorado. They discuss the basics of surviving in the wilderness for the average person.

Blue Zones residents living longer, healthier lives

Jul 19, 2015
Ed Schipul / Flickr

Roughly one in 5,000 people in the United States lives to be 100 years old, yet there are concentrated places in the world where living to 100 is not unusual, and people manage to live this long without contracting any preventable diseases. These areas, called “Blue Zones,” are located in Ikaria, Greece; Okinawa, Japan; Ogliastra Region, Sardinia; Loma Linda, California; and Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to National Geographic Explorer Dan Buettner, who has traveled the globe to uncover the longevity secrets used in these Blue Zones, how these people are able to live for such a remarkably long time. Buettner recently released his latest book, “The Blue Zones Solution: Eating and Living Like the World’s Healthiest People.”

Hot dogs and hamburgers: the truth about the meat we buy

Jul 19, 2015
Chris H / Flickr

According to the National Sausage and Hot Dog Council, during peak hotdog season, Americans typically consume 7 billion hot dogs. But what exactly is in these hotdogs that people buy at the supermarket, and is it healthy for people to be eating so many of them?

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Kerri-Ann Jennings about what exactly is in the meat of the hot dogs and hamburgers that we eat. Jennings is a registered dietician and nutritionist, as well as former editor for Eating Well Magazine.

WXXI News

Six-year-old Jason Green is spending his afternoon at the dentist’s office, but his focus is on the many stickers he is earning by behaving during the appointment.

“Well, I have been really good,” Jason beams, holding a stack of adhesive monster truck drawings.

To live longer, live like you're in a 'Blue Zone'

Jul 17, 2015
almekri01 / Flickr

It seems everyone is looking for a secret to living a long, healthy life. But Dan Buettner, a National Geographic explorer and author has traveled the world to find it.

This week on WRVO's health and wellness program "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak to Buettner about why a higher percentage of people in what he calls "Blue Zones" live to be 100 years old without preventable diseases.

Support for this story comes from The Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

How to avoid dehydration throughout the summer

Jul 12, 2015
faungg / Flickr

Water and summer go together like peanut butter and jelly. From the ocean to backyard pools, water tends to be a way of life for most during hot weather. But while everyone is having fun many forget how important it is to drink water as well.

This week on “Take Care,” health expert Johannah Sakimura talks about the importance of staying hydrated during these hot summer months.

roujo / Flickr

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in both men and women in the United States, but the number of heart disease related deaths has declined over the past 50 years and continues to do so.

This week on “Take Care,” New York Times health and science reporter Gina Kolata talks about the minor changes hospitals have made to heart attack treatments that might have an impact on heart disease deaths in the U.S.

osseous / Flickr

The leading cause of death in the U.S. has seen an incredible drop in the last decade or so. That's because hospitals have made a series of small changes that have led to the survival of more heart attack victims. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with New York Times health and science reporter Gina Kolata about what she found were the reasons behind this change.

The link between brain disease and our gut

Jun 28, 2015
James Joel / Flickr

The hip bone is connected to the back bone. The back bone is connected to the chest bone. But is the brain connected to the gut?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Perlmutter sits down to discuss the connection between gut and brain health. Perlmutter is an associate professor at the University of Miami School of Medicine, a board-certified neurologist and fellow of the American College of Nutrition.

Kevin Krejci / Flickr

With the sun beating down during these summer months, many of us lather on some sunscreen and find relief in the nearest body of water. Pools however, often used as a shield from the sun’s harmful rays, might not be as harmless as we think.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Emmy Graber, assistant professor of dermatology at the Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, addresses chlorine and its effect on our skin and hair.

Is the brain connected to the gut?

Jun 26, 2015

In recent years, medical researchers have been discovering more about the link between gut health and overall health. This week's on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," neurologist and author Dr. David Perlmutter talks about the idea that microbes in the gut could affect neurological conditions. Dr. Perlmutter writes about explores this connection in his book “Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain – For Life.”  

More of this interview can be heard on "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show Sunday evening at 6:30 p.m.

Yale Rosen / Flickr

Lung cancer is considered the leading cause of cancer deaths among both men and women. How can it be prevented and who is more likely to get it?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Martin Edelman talks about what can cause lung cancer and who can develop it. Edelman is head of the Solid Tumor Oncology Department at the University of Maryland’s Greenebaum Cancer Center.

Is Facebook making us sad?

Jun 21, 2015
TSEVIS / Flickr

Facebook and the world of social media has given the average person easy access to friends, family and even strangers’ lives with the click of a button or swipe of the thumb. But does having that access make our lives sadder?

This week on “Take Care,” Mai-Ly Nguyen Steers addresses the surprising link between Facebook and depression. Steers is a social psychologist at the University of Houston. Her study, "Seeing Everyone Else's Highlight Reels: How Facebook Usage is Linked to Depressive Symptoms," was published in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

Facebook, social comparison and depression

Jun 19, 2015
melenita / Flickr

Americans are spending more and more time on social media. But that can lead to an unexpected impact on the mental health of social media users. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "take care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview University of Houston social psychologist Mai-Ly Nguyen Steers about her research into the links between Facebook and depression. Steers’ study "Seeing Everyone Else's Highlight Reels: How Facebook Usage is Linked to Depressive Symptoms," was published in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

Diabetes: Symptoms, signs and causes

Jun 14, 2015
Neeta Lind / Flickr

Diabetes has reached epidemic levels, and in fact is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, but many people don't know exactly what it is, beyond the fact that is has something to do with sugar levels.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Nathan discusses diabetes, how it’s caused and what symptoms to check for if you’ve developed it. Nathan is a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the General Clinical Research Center and of the Diabetes Center at Massachusetts General Hospital.  

Food trucks: Consider this on-the-go cuisine a go

Jun 14, 2015
gwen / Flickr

Food trucks, while mobile, have a foothold in many urban areas. And they’re not just providing American food staples – your classic grilled cheese or hot dog. Some of these trucks are quite near gourmet, specializing in locally-sourced food or a particular culture’s cuisine. But are they safe? Is the food prepared in the truck? Do food trucks follow the same regulations as regular restaurants?

This week on “Take Care,” we speak to Richard Myrick about food truck safety. Myrick is an expert in the field, the founder of Mobile-Cuisine.com (the online trade magazine of the mobile food industry) and the author of the book “Running a Food Truck for Dummies.”

Why food trucks may be safer than you think

Jun 12, 2015
daryl_mitchell / Flickr

Food trucks have made a name for themselves in many communities and even on national television. Sometimes they offer food made only from local ingredients, specialty items or even gourmet dishes. And if there's a long line, you know it's good! But is it safe? What kind of regulations do these mobile restaurants and kitchens adhere to?

This week on Take Care, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak to Richard Myrick. Myrick is one of the foremost leaders in the field and author of the book "Running a Food Truck for Dummies."

Preventing falls as you get older: exercise is the key

Jun 7, 2015
Rosie O'Beirne / Flickr

Many older people have a great fear of falling – and with good reason. When a senior citizen falls, the likelihood of serious injury is far greater than when a younger person does. And for the elderly, falls can be disabling and even lead to death.

This week on “Take Care,” we interview Dr. Laurence Z. Rubenstein, professor and chairman of the Department of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Rubenstein has researched and worked extensively on the development of interventions to prevent falls in older adults.

Vienze Ziction / Flickr

Not only do sunglasses reduce glare while we’re driving and help us to see more comfortably when we’re outside, but they also help to reduce the risk of eye damage.

This week on “Take Care,” professor of ophthalmology at the University of California Davis Medical School and spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Dr. Ivan Schwab, explains why sunglasses can prevent damage to the eyes and what damage the sun can cause.

What seniors can do to help prevent falls

Jun 5, 2015

When younger people fall down, it may lead to some bumps and bruises. But for senior citizens, falls are much more likely to be life changing -- leading to broken hips or disability. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview Dr. Laurence Rubenstein, chairman of the Department of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine about the dangers of falls for the elderly and how to prevent them.

No yolks about it, eggs are healthy

May 31, 2015
UnknownNet Photography / Flickr

One day you hear they’re good for you and other days you hear they’re bad. The healthiness (or unhealthiness) of eggs have been debated for decades. Does the protein outweigh the cholesterol? What makes an egg good or bad and should we continue incorporating eggs into our diets?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Luc Djousse discusses the nutritional value of eggs. Djousse is director of research in the Division of Aging at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and is assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Want a taste? Taste buds and supertasters

May 31, 2015
animantis / Flickr

The human tongue is an organ that enables us to enjoy the sense of taste. And on the tongue lies those bumps that we call our taste buds, which makes eating chocolate so pleasurable and ice cream so indulgent.

This week on “Take Care,” hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp talk to Dr. Linda Bartoshuk about how those taste buds work and why people have different tastes than others. Dr. Bartoshuk is the director of human research at the University of Florida Center for Smell and Taste, and is the scientist behind the groundbreaking discovery of supertasters -- individuals who have stronger reactions to taste than most of us.

Eggs -- incredible again?

May 29, 2015
Marina Shemesh / Flickr

First medical experts told us not to eat too many eggs because they're high in cholesterol. But earlier this year, we were told that eating cholesterol is not what causes heart disease. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care", hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview Dr. Luc Djousse, director of research in the Division of Aging at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and an assistant professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. They discuss the nutrients found in eggs and how dietary cholesterol really works.

marknewell / Flickr

Nurses who provide care to cancer patients do some of the most emotionally difficult work there is in medicine. The life and death situations they routinely face can lead to what was once known as burnout, but is now called "compassion fatigue." The issue is compounded by the ethical dilemmas that frequently surround end-of-life treatment decisions made by physicians and family members.

This week on “Take Care,” Pattie Jakel discusses the ethics of oncology nursing. Jakel is a clinical nurse specialist in the Solid Oncology Program at the UCLA Santa Monica Hospital, Santa Monica, California. She has a master’s degree in nursing and has published studies on the ethical conflicts of oncology nursing.

Green thumb, healthy plate

May 24, 2015
Vicki Moore / Flickr

Vegetables that people grow themselves have benefits not available through any other source. If you want salad for dinner, you can walk into your own garden and pick it yourself. You know nobody else has handled it, it hasn't traveled miles to your table and you're getting all of nature's nutrients at their peak.

So how hard is it to grow a vegetable garden? This week on “Take Care,” Marie Iannotti recommends five healthy vegetables that are also easy to grow for the modest gardener. Iannotti is a longtime master gardener, a former Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulture educator, master gardener program coordinator, and a member of the Garden Writer's Association and The Garden Conservancy. She's the author of two gardening books and is the gardening expert at About.com.

Nurses who provide care to cancer patients do some of the most emotionally difficult work there is in medicine. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview Pattie Jakel, a clinical nurse specialist in the Oncology Program at the UCLA Santa Monica Hospital in California. They discuss the ethical dilemmas oncology nurses often confront.

Chewing tobacco means big league risks

May 17, 2015
Ben Roffer / Flickr

As baseball season gets underway, there's a revival of not only hot dogs, but chewing tobacco. Baseball’s history with chewing tobacco began early on, when players sought to keep their mouths from getting dry due to hot, dusty conditions. What are the dangers of chewing tobacco and other forms of smokeless tobacco, and why has it been overlooked even as society clamps down on cigarettes?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Pfister discusses the dangers chewing tobacco has on the mouth area and the entire body. Pfister is the chief of the head and neck oncology service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.

Nail salon safety: how to avoid a foot bath faux pas

May 17, 2015
FoundryParkInn / Flickr

A visit to the nail salon is a time to relax, decompress and spruce up your digits, but don't think you're out of the water (or foot bath) just yet. Have you considered the safety of your visit?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Dana Stern talks about nail salon safety and how to avoid catching fungal infections. Stern is assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City.

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