Take Care

Saturday at 6:30 a.m. and Sunday at 6:30 pm

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email both Linda, Lorraine and the show producers at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

WRVO allows republishing of Take Care web posts at no charge, with the following provisions:  a) no editing of scripts, graphics or audio is allowed;  b) "WRVO Public Media" shall be credited on the republished post; and c) notification of intent to republish a post is emailed to TakeCare@wrvo.org.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

Screening for prostate cancer

Jun 24, 2017
Neeta Lind / Flickr

As men age, the likelihood of being diagnosed with prostate cancer goes up. And since prostate cancer is the most common cancer for American men, how to screen for this disease has been quite controversial.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo discusses the latest recommendations for prostate cancer screening. Bibbins-Domingo chairs the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that issued new recommendations in April 2017. Bibbins-Domingo is professor of medicine and of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco.

Watch your salt, whether it's kosher, table, pink or sea

Jun 24, 2017
Andrew Huff / Flickr

Salt used to be salt. It was iodized, it sat on the table in a shaker, and it was used during cooking and after. While basic table salt is still a staple of many households, other salts have come on the market and offered quite a bit of competition. This week we ask, “What’s the difference?”

Kerri-Ann Jennings joins us on “Take Care” to talk about salt and why it’s still best to take it easy with the salt shaker. Jennings is a registered dietitian and freelance nutrition writer who contributes to WebMD, FoodNetwork.com and other publications.

Prostate cancer: what we know about screening

Jun 23, 2017

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men. But the recommendations about who should be screened for the disease have changed over the years, leading to some confusion. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, the chair of the U.S. preventive services task force, which released the most recent prostate cancer screening guidelines earlier this year.

Tick-borne diseases on the move

Jun 17, 2017
Macroscopic Solutions / Flickr

Residents of the Northeastern U.S. have become increasingly familiar with Lyme disease, which is transmitted by ticks. But the tick population in this country is spreading and growing, and along with it, so are the diseases they carry.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Richard Ostfeld, senior scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, a not-for-profit research institution in Millbrook, New York, discusses the latest information on ticks and tick-borne diseases. The Cary Institute examines the science behind environmental solutions. Ostfeld also teaches at Rutgers University and the University of Connecticut, and has authored the book, "Lyme Disease: The Ecology of a Complex System."

Going nuts for butters

Jun 17, 2017
Susan Rubin / Flickr

While many American kids grow up eating peanut butter, in recent years, a wide variety of different kinds of nut and seed butters have hit the grocery store shelves. But what kind of nutritional value to they all provide?

This week on “Take Care,” sports nutritionist Nancy Clark gives us a primer on nut and seed butters. Clark is the author of “Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guidebook.” She writes the monthly nutrition column “The Athlete's Kitchen,” which appears in over 100 sports and fitness publications and websites.

Fairfax County / Flickr

Many residents of the Northeast are familiar with Lyme disease. But the tick population in this country is increasing -- and so are the number of tick-borne diseases and the number of people contracting them. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Richard Ostfeld, a disease ecologist with the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York.

Defining and treating alcohol use disorder

Jun 10, 2017
Matthias Ripp / Flickr

Addiction to alcohol is costly both on a personal level and as a public health issue. But while neither new nor rare, it’s a disease that is misunderstood by many.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Patrick O'Connor, professor of general medicine at Yale School of Medicine, discusses alcohol abuse and its treatments. O’Connor has written extensively on alcoholism and opioid addiction and is the chief of general internal medicine at the Primary Care Center, Yale-New Haven Hospital.

Water systems & safety worries

Jun 10, 2017
Martina Yach / Flickr

In the United States, most people take it for granted that they will be able to go to the faucet, turn it on and get clean water. But in recent years, cases where something goes wrong with municipal water systems have made headlines and put the state of the nation’s water infrastructure under a microscope.

This week on “Take Care,” Richard Anderson, senior advisor to the U.S. Conference of Mayors Water Council, discusses how municipal water systems work, and the challenges communities face in delivering safe, clean water to residents. Anderson has held his position as advisor since 1999. 

Ryan Delaney / WRVO News File Photo

Recent incidents in Flint, Michigan and Hoosick Falls, New York have brought to light the problems with many municipal water systems. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Richard Anderson, senior advisor to the U.S. Conference of Mayors Water Council about the state of the country's water infrastructure. Anderson has held that position since 1999.

Combating aging: the latest in medical technology

Jun 3, 2017
NEC-Medical -137 / Flickr

Getting older is an inevitable part of our lives, with age-related issues and conditions inspiring new advancements in technology to aid those affected. Whether it’s medication management, falling, or other problems facing aging adults, the latest medical technologies are offering new ways to combat those barriers.

To find out more about some of these new technologies, “Take Care” was joined by Dr. David Lindeman, director of the Center for Technology and Aging -- a research group in Oakland, California.

Bagged lettuce better than no lettuce

Jun 3, 2017
Leah Landry / WRVO News

Bagged lettuce may seem like one of those true conveniences of modern life. You want to eat more salad, but don’t want to spend time washing, tearing and chopping. But is eating bagged lettuce as healthy for you as a good old head of lettuce?

This week on “Take Care,” Kerri-Ann Jennings, a registered dietitian and freelance nutrition writer, answers that question for us. Jennings contributes to WebMD, FoodNetwork.com and other publications.

ACT Project Concordia / Flickr

Many seniors need to -- or want to -- remain in their homes as they get older. It’s often referred to as “aging in place.” But they often need help. More and more, that help is coming in the form of new technology. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with David Lindeman, director of the Center for Technology and Aging in Oakland, CA about some of the new gadgets and devices that can help the elderly remain safe and healthy at home.

The return of recess

May 20, 2017
John Lustig / Flickr

As public schools have been pressured to emphasize academics in recent years, one of the traditions of the school day that often gets put on the chopping block is recess. But studies show that recess provides a variety of benefits beyond a break in the school day for kids.

This week on “Take Care,” Michelle Carter, senior program manager of the Society of Health and Physical Educators, better known as SHAPE America, discusses the benefits recess can provide. Carter has also served as a health and physical education teacher in the Washington, D.C. public school system.

Want whiter teeth? Don't head to your local pharmacy

May 20, 2017
Rupert-Taylor Price / Flickr

A pearly white smile isn’t always easy to come by. While some blame genetics, coffee and tea, teeth yellowing is a natural part of aging. Teeth whitening is a fairly new obsession, but with gels, lights, pastes and strips, the trend continues to pick up speed.

This week on “Take Care,” we speak to Dr. Mark Burhenne about the different kinds of whitening products available and if they’re effective or even safe. Burhenne is a practicing dentist of over 30 years and creator of the popular website “Ask the Dentist."

Reading, writing and recess

May 19, 2017
cryptic_star / Flickr

Over the years, some school districts around the country have gotten rid of recess to make more time for academics. But studies show that recess has many benefits -- and not just increasing physical activity. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Michelle Carter, a senior program manager for the Society of Health and Physical Educators or SHAPE America, about the campaign to bring back recess. Carter has also served as a health and physical education teacher in the Washington, D.C. public school system.

Christoph Habel / Flickr

Whether you’re nine or 90, falls pose a risk to anyone on their feet. They can be unexpected, startling, and dangerous – especially as we get older – and as the leading cause of concussion and traumatic brain injury, it’s important to know what we can do to protect ourselves, should we take a tumble.

To find out about the right way to fall, “Take Care” spoke with physical therapist Jessica Schwartz, who works with athletes and individuals with prosthetic limbs on how to prevent falls and respective injuries.

Bakoko / Flickr

Of all the factors that influence our well-being, our environment itself is one often overlooked. We consider exercise and nutrition, sleep and stress -- but new research suggests that an optimal, “green” environment may be more influential than previously understood, increasing both productivity and overall health in the workplace and beyond.

To learn more about the latest in green environments, “Take Care” was joined by Piers MacNaughton, associate director of the Healthy Buildings Program at the Harvard Center for Health and Global Environment. MacNaughton recently managed a study on environmental influences in the hopes of determining what an “optimal built environment” looks like.

Green buildings, better workers?

May 12, 2017
Joh739 / Flickr

Companies are always looking for ways to make their employees more productive. Now, a new study shows that making buildings more environmentally friendly, or “green,” can make them healthier for the workers inside -- and improves those workers' cognitive functions. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Piers MacNaughton, an associate director of the Healthy Buildings Program at the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment. Dr. MacNaughton was the project manager for the study.

Iain Watson / Flickr

Often when we think of therapy, we imagine an office complete with a desk, a chaise lounge, and a clinician with a clipboard. But as technology continues to transform the way we live, changes in therapy are yet another sign of the times. Different from traditional, in-person therapy, online therapy has its own criteria and benefits, and is becoming an increasingly popular option for individuals seeking mental health treatment.

To find out more about online therapy, “Take Care” spoke with associate executive director of practice research and policy for the American Psychological Association, Dr. Lynn Bufka.

Combating arthritis: The word on knee injections

May 6, 2017
Penn State / Flickr

Characterized by painful inflammation and stiffness of the joints, arthritis is an affliction that ails many. As weight-bearing joints, the knees are particularly prone to the most common form of arthritis, osteoarthritis. In an effort to find relief, some may consider surgery and medication. For others, corticosteroid injections in the knee have become an effective means to combat their osteoarthritis.

To find out more about these knee injections and their effectiveness, “Take Care” spoke with Dr. Robert Shmerling, associate physician and clinical chief of rheumatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Going online for talk therapy

May 5, 2017

Technology is transforming many aspects of medicine -- including psychotherapy. Online talk therapy is a growing business. But is it as effective as traditional therapy? And does talking about your personal issues over the internet with a therapist remain private and secure?

This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Lynn Bufka, associate executive director of practice research and policy at the American Psychological Association, about what to consider before choosing online talk therapy.

The latest recommendations for breast cancer screening

Apr 29, 2017
Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

For many women, breast cancer screenings are an important consideration for their health and peace of mind. In recent years, however, screening recommendations have changed, and some may be left unsure of what to do. When is the right time for a baseline mammogram? And how often again after that?

To answer these questions and more, “Take Care” was joined by Dr. Jane Charlamb, director of the Division of Breast Health and Lactation Medicine in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at SUNY Upstate Medical University. Charlamb’s clinical practice focuses on benign breast disease, breast cancer screening, and prevention in high risk women.

Getting protein on the go

Apr 29, 2017
Alyson Hurt / Flickr

Getting protein during a sit-down meal may not be hard, but getting more protein in snacks can be more difficult. Many protein-rich foods like meat are hard to consume when you’re on the go.

This week on "Take Care," nutritionist Joan Rogus discusses protein’s role in our diet and the various snacks that are packed with it, including some surprising ones. Rogus is a registered dietician in central New York who has her own private practice in Syracuse.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The guidelines for screening for breast cancer have changed over the years. This has led to a lot of confusion among women about who needs to be screened and when. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Jayne Charlamb, Director of the Division of Breast Health and Lactation Medicine in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, about why the guidelines have changed and what the current recommendations are.

Eelke / Flickr

With so many health products and practices promising to provide quick fixes to all that ails us, it can be difficult to discern which ones actually work. But for doctors and medical researchers, the question of effectiveness becomes an opportunity for clinical studies.

To find out more about some of these studies, “Take Care” spoke with Dr. Joann Manson, a professor of medicine at Harvard University, and chief of the Division of Preventive Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

The dangers of drowsy driving

Apr 22, 2017
ZACK MCCARTHY / Flickr

Every day, many of us drive cars, and every night, we’re meant to get seven to eight hours of sleep. But sometimes, seven to eight is more like four to five, and this can have some nasty effects behind the wheel. In fact, over one-third of drivers on the road right now didn’t get enough sleep last night.

So, what does this mean for the safety of our roads? To find out, “Take Care” spoke with Jake Nelson, director of traffic safety advocacy and research for AAA.

Why sleep deprivation & driving don't mix

Apr 21, 2017
Saurabh Mishra / Flickr

Much attention has been given to the dangers of driving while drunk. But, if you're sleep deprived and you get behind the wheel, it can be just as risky. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Jake Nelson, director of traffic safety advocacy and research for AAA, about the dangers of drowsy driving.

yourblogondrugs.com / Flickr

In recent years, the United States has seen an alarming spike in opioid overdoses. From prescription painkillers to street drugs like heroin, opioid abuse has led to widespread addiction and all too often, death. Today, development of the counterdrug Narcan is serving to combat the growing problem and save the lives of those affected.

To find out more about this epidemic and what’s being done about it, “Take Care” spoke with emergency medicine physician and Baltimore Health Commissioner, Dr. Leana Wen.

Painkillers: prescription or affliction?

Apr 15, 2017
VCU CNS / Flickr

When a water heater fell on him one fateful day at work, John Dias’ life was forever changed. He awoke in the hospital, partially paralyzed, and when he left, he had a prescription for OxyContin. But like so many others, his prescription became his affliction, resulting in a severe addiction and eventual overdoses.

In recent years, this occurrence has become all too common, leading to the development of the antidote naloxone – the very medicine which revived Dias on two separate occasions. To find out more about his story, “Take Care” spoke with Dias, who opened up about his experience and the importance of naloxone, also known by the brand name Narcan.

M / Flickr

The opioid epidemic has torn apart communities across the country. One city has decided to take what some might call extraordinary measures to help fight fatal overdoses and save lives. Baltimore now has a program that makes the fast-acting opioid antidote naloxone, or Narcan, available to every resident in the city.

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