Take Care

Saturday at 6:30 a.m. and Sunday at 6:30 pm

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email both Linda, Lorraine and the show producers at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

WRVO allows republishing of Take Care web posts at no charge, with the following provisions:  a) no editing of scripts, graphics or audio is allowed;  b) "WRVO Public Media" shall be credited on the republished post; and c) notification of intent to republish a post is emailed to TakeCare@wrvo.org.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

Rebuilding the doctor-patient relationship

Aug 20, 2016
Andrew Malone / Flickr

When you visit the doctor you might feel like you spend more time in the waiting room than in the actual examination room. But with dozens of patients a day, it can be difficult for primary care doctors to spend more time with each person.

This week on "Take Care," Tom Blue explains how patients can get more face-to-face time with their doctor through something called concierge medicine. Blue is a pioneer in concierge medicine and has been building private physician practices since 2002. He is also the executive director of the American Academy of Private Physicians, and is the co-founder and chief strategy officer of LeadHealth, which focuses on functional medicine to control health care costs and improve the lives of its members.

Digging into the hidden subconcious of the brain

Aug 20, 2016
wyinoue / Flickr

Do you ever find yourself wondering why you do the things you do every day, or reach the decisions you make? Most of the time, small everyday tasks and decisions aren't given much thought by our conscious mind, but our unconscious mind may always be thinking about them.

This week on "Take Care," Shankar Vedantam, a science correspondent for NPR who focuses on human behavior and social sciences, explains what he calls the hidden brain and his work on the topic. Vedantam is the host of the NPR podcast "The Hidden Brain," which has explored topics such as unbearable boredom, the art of forgery, and what drives romantic relationships besides love. He is also the author of the book, "The Hidden Brain: How Our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars, and Save Our Lives."

Alex Proimos / flickr

One complaint about today's medical system is that treatment can seem impersonal. The idea of concierge medicine tries to combat this by charging a monthly fee to allow doctors to take fewer patients and provide more individual focus. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Tom Blue, executive director of the American Academy of Private Physicians, about concierge or private medicine.

Christopher Brown / Flickr

If you were asked what the best place for your cell phone is, you might say your pocket. But a recent study has shown keeping your cell phone on your person may be connected to certain types of cancer.

This week on “Take Care,” journalist Dina Fine Maron shares the findings of this study. Maron’s article, “Major Cell Phone Radiation Study Reignites Cancer Questions,” appeared in Scientific Americanin May 2016. Maron is an award winning journalist, the health and medicine editor for Scientific American, and is a contributor to the publication's podcasts and Instant Egghead video series.

How to make healthy life changes from tiny habits

Aug 13, 2016
Nathan Rupert / Flickr

When it comes to making a change in our life, such as reducing stress or losing weight, it can seem difficult. But if we broke it down into small steps that eventually turned that change into an everyday routine, it might not seem so scary.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. B.J. Fogg tells us about this new theory he calls “Tiny Habits:” a model he’s created for human behavior change, guided by research and design. Fogg is a psychologist and innovator who directs the persuasive tech lab at Stanford University, is the author of “Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do,” and has been selected by Fortune Magazine as one of the “10 Gurus You Should Know.”

How tiny habits can lead to lasting change

Aug 12, 2016

Change is hard. And if you're trying to make a healthy change -- like losing weight or quitting smoking -- the challenge may seem monumental. This week, WRVO's health and wellness show features an interview with B.J. Fogg, A Stanford University psychologist and innovator. He says the secret to lasting change is developing changes in your behavior, which he calls tiny habits.

Chris Potter / Flickr

You care about your health, but it can be expensive. Between doctor’s visits, co-pays, and prescription medication, the final bill can be more than you expect. But what if there was a way to make it cheaper?

This week on “Take Care,” Matthew Chaiken tells us about his new company Blink Health, and how they’re able to cut out the middle man when it comes to buying prescription drugs at the pharmacy. Chaiken co-founded Blink Health with his brother Geoffrey in 2014, and they launched the company’s website and mobile app this past February.

Mindful eating: Let your body tell you when you're full

Aug 6, 2016
Scott Kidder / Flickr

You may feel you don’t always eat because you’re hungry, but to fulfill other emotions, such as boredom, stress, sadness or anger.

Overeating can often be a result of mindless eating when we’re feeling these emotions, according to this week’s “Take Care” guest, Dr. Lynn Rossy. Rossy is the author of the book "The Mindfulness-Based Eating Solution: Proven Strategies to End Overeating, Satisfy Your Hunger, and Savor Your Life,” and is a licensed clinical psychologist for the wellness program at the University of Missouri. She is also on the board of directors for the Center for Mindful Eating.

Being mindful of your eating

Aug 5, 2016
Michelle Hurwitz / Flickr

Sometimes physical hunger isn't the only reason we choose to eat. Mindless eating, a topic we explore this week on "Take Care," can bring comfort and mask other issues.

This week on WRVO's health and wellness show, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Lynn Rossy, a clinical psychologist at the University of Missouri's Wellness Program. Rossy helps people learn to check in with their bodies, recognize when they're full and avoid overeating.

Some find art more therapeutic than words

Jul 30, 2016
David Goehring / Flickr

Even if your version of drawing is simple stick figures, you may find yourself feeling relaxed when you doodle on papers or color. Creating art has even been proven to have a therapeutic value in the medical world.

The term art therapy was coined in the 1940s, and today is applied in a variety of settings to aid both children and adults in expressing and releasing trauma. This week on “Take Care,” international art therapy expert, Cathy Malchiodi gives us an insight to art therapy and how it works. Malchiodi is a research psychologist, art therapist, and clinical counselor. She is also the founder and director of the Trauma-Informed Practices and Expressive Arts Therapy Institute, and is the president of Art Therapy Without Borders.

Gallstones; why they form and how they can be prevented

Jul 30, 2016
Hey Paul Studios / Flickr

It’s a small organ on the right side of the body behind the liver. It’s three inches long, shaped like a pear and it can cause us severe pain if our cholesterol builds up -- but we can live without it. Can you guess what it is? 

The gallbladder is the organ that fits this description. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Salam Zakko enlightens us on what this organ does and why it's sometimes removed. Zakko is a gastroenterologist and the executive director at Connecticut Gastroenterology Institute and Clinical Research Foundation at Bristol Hospital. He is also a clinical professor in medicine at the University of Connecticut.

How art therapy can help some deal with trauma

Jul 29, 2016
Jessica Wilson / Flickr

The therapeutic value of art has long been recognized. Today art therapy is used to treat adults and children with a variety of mental health issues. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with research psychologist and art therapist Cathy Malchiodi about how art therapy is used to help patients.

Staying safe when lightning strikes

Jul 23, 2016
Andreas Øverland / Flickr

When we think of something with low odds, like winning the lottery, we might compare it to getting struck by lightning. However, the chances of getting struck by lightning may be higher than you think.

There is actually a one-in-12,000 chance this could happen in your lifetime, according to the National Weather Service. This week on “Take Care,” lightning expert John Jensenius tells us what we need to know about lightning and how to stay safe when it strikes. Jensenius is a meteorologist and lightning safety specialist with the National Weather Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Tim Sandle / Flickr

Donating blood and organs, if possible, is encouraged in the medical world to save lives. But recently, medical professionals may also be looking for a new type of donor—fecal.

Fecal transplantation dates back to 4th century China, according to the Fecal Transplant Foundation, and is a recent, but often effective, treatment for a specific type of colitis. To explain fecal transplantation this week on “Take Care,” is Dr. Rajeev Jain. Jain is a partner at Texas Digestive Disease Consultants, the chief of gastroenterology at Texas Heath Dallas, and is a clinical assistant professor of medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School.

Lightning can strike and be dangerous

Jul 22, 2016
Nathan Vaughn / Flickr

Summertime in many parts of the world means thunderstorms. And with thunder comes the danger of lightning. While being struck by lightning is often thought to be rare, it can happen, and can cause permanent injury or death. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with John Jensenius, a meteorologist and lightning safety specialist with the National Weather Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Suffering economy causes stress in college graduates

Jul 16, 2016
Shilad Sen / Flickr

For generations kids have been told that if they work hard in school, they’ll get a good job. But this doesn’t seem to be so simple for the millennial generation, as there just aren’t enough jobs in the current economy to go around.

Little berries are big super food

Jul 16, 2016
Min Liu / Flickr

Whether you buy them fresh or frozen, pick them off the bush or grow them yourself, berries are one of the best foods to have in the house. They’re tasty and, nutrition-wise, pack a big punch for such a small food.

Rachel.Adams / Flickr

The millennial generation is experiencing high levels of stress over work and career. Large student loans, difficulty finding a job after college and the new economy are causing mental health issues for a growing number of younger people. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," Hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Vinita Mehta, a clinical psychologist and journalist about this increase in anxiety among millennials.

Exercise intensity may affect your mood

Jul 9, 2016
eltpics / Flickr

For many years research has proven just how much daily exercise can improve our overall health. But even with this information, some of us still dread exercise and can’t get past the idea of the sweating, aching, and tiredness it can make us feel.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Paddy Ekkekakis explains why some of us may feel this way toward exercise more than others. Ekkekakis is a professor at Iowa State University and has been researching pleasure and displeasure responses resulting from exercise and physical activity for the past 25 years. His current focus is on the psycho-biological mechanism of the sense of fatigue, and reasons for avoiding physical activity.

How to keep your feet healthy this summer

Jul 9, 2016
Kaylyn Izzo / WRVO

You've kept them bound up and under wraps all winter, and now your feet want to get out and enjoy the sun just like you do. But with more exposure comes more possibility for injury and infection.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Neal Blitz shares with us how to keep our feet healthy this summer. Blitz is a reconstructive foot and ankle surgeon, and the creator of the Bunionplasty bunion surgery procedure. He is also a fellow of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, and maintains a private practice in New York City.

Fit Approach / Flickr

Medical experts agree that exercise can help prevent a variety of diseases and disorders and is generally good for you. But exercising does not put everyone in a good mood. This week WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care" takes a look at the relationship between mood and exercise in an interview with Paddy Ekkekakis of Iowa State University. Ekkekakis has researched how exercise causes pleasure and displeasure.

The dangers of sun exposure and melanoma

Jun 25, 2016
Sunny_mjx / Flickr

A day on the lake, an afternoon of yard work, watching a baseball game; these are all events that can put us in direct sunlight. But with a 200 percent increase in melanoma diagnoses since the 1970s, we may need to take more precaution when it comes to the sun.

Fortunately, there have been improvements in diagnosis and treatment over the past few decades.This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Lynn Schuchter explains the rise in melanoma and gives us the latest on treatment and prevention. Schuchter is the medicine division chief of hematology-oncology at Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania.  She also leads the melanoma program at the university, and is a professor of hematology-oncology.

Things to keep in mind when grilling this summer

Jun 25, 2016
Tojosan / Flickr

Nothing beats the taste of flame grilled food in the summertime. But there are some things to keep in mind in terms of safety when using the grill.

This week on “Take Care,” food safety expert Benjamin Chapman tells us what we need to know. Chapman is an associate professor and food safety extension specialist at North Carolina State University. He's also the co-host of the podcast “Food Safety Talk.”

Great grilling means safe grilling

Jun 24, 2016
Matt Malone / Flickr

Many people look forward to grilling in the summertime as a fun, healthy choice. But if not done properly, grilling can be dangerous and cause a food safety issue. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with food safety expert Benjamin Chapman, a professor at North Carolina State University about the do's and don'ts of grilling. Chapman also co-hosts the podcast “Food Safety Talk.”

Why sustainability should be incorporated into our diets

Jun 18, 2016
Aleksandra B. / Flickr

When we think about healthy eating, many of us view it in regards to our personal health. However, we may need to view it in terms of a healthy environment as well.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Walter Willett tells us the dangers industrially producing food can have on the environment, and why a sustainable diet should become a necessity. Willett is the chair of the nutrition department at Harvard University School of Public Health, and the Fredrick John Stare professor of epidemiology and nutrition. He is also the chair of the Scientific and Technical Advisory Council of the annual Menus of Change leadership summit, which analyzes issues involving public health, the environment, and the food industry.

What you need to know about latex allergy

Jun 18, 2016
Victor BS / Flickr

There are many things a person can be allergic to. However, an uncommon, but serious allergy that can sometimes be overlooked is latex.

A latex allergy can cause severe discomfort, and in extreme cases death. To explain this allergy on “Take Care” this week, is Dr. Neeta Ogden. Ogden is an adult and pediatric allergist, asthma specialist and immunologist in private practice in New York City. She is also a spokesperson for the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

fishhawk / Flickr

When you think of healthy eating, you probably think of food that's nutritious for you. But what if we thought more about eating in a way that's healthy for the environment? The idea of sustainable eating is a philosophy that more people are adopting. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Walter Willett, chair of the Nutrition Department at the Harvard School of Public Health, about which foods have the most impact on the environment. Willett is one of the world's experts on sustainable eating.

The pharmacist's role and what it takes to become one

Jun 11, 2016
Mike Mozart / Flickr

They wear a white lab coat, but aren’t your typical doctor. They work behind a counter, but they don’t serve you food. A pharmacist fills your prescriptions and makes sure they are safe for you. But how do they earn their white lab coat and spot behind the counter?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Elizabeth Higdon tells us what it means to be a pharmacist. Higdon is an instructor in the department of pharmacy practice at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences campus in Colchester, Vermont. She also holds a doctor of pharmacy degree, teaches classes on over-the-counter medications, and works as a community pharmacist.

Steps to a successful herb garden

Jun 11, 2016
Kaylyn Izzo

If you’re not big on gardening, but still want to add a fresh taste to every dish, an herb garden may be something to consider.

This week on “Take Care,” gardening expert, Amy Jeanroy tells us how to make this simple, yet useful, garden a success. Jeanroy covers herb gardening for the how-to website About.com, and has operated a family greenhouse business for the past 15 years. She is also the author of ”Canning and Preserving for Dummies,” which is now in its second edition.

A pharmacist's role in your health care

Jun 10, 2016
NVinacco / Flickr

Many of us rely on pharmacists for nothing more than filling a prescription. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Elizabeth Higdon, an instructor with the Department of Pharmacy Practice at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, about the role pharmacists can play as part of your health care team.

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