Take Care

Sunday evenings at 6:30 pm

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email both Linda, Lorraine and the show producers at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

marknewell / Flickr

Nurses who provide care to cancer patients do some of the most emotionally difficult work there is in medicine. The life and death situations they routinely face can lead to what was once known as burnout, but is now called "compassion fatigue." The issue is compounded by the ethical dilemmas that frequently surround end-of-life treatment decisions made by physicians and family members.

This week on “Take Care,” Pattie Jakel discusses the ethics of oncology nursing. Jakel is a clinical nurse specialist in the Solid Oncology Program at the UCLA Santa Monica Hospital, Santa Monica, California. She has a master’s degree in nursing and has published studies on the ethical conflicts of oncology nursing.

Green thumb, healthy plate

May 24, 2015
Vicki Moore / Flickr

Vegetables that people grow themselves have benefits not available through any other source. If you want salad for dinner, you can walk into your own garden and pick it yourself. You know nobody else has handled it, it hasn't traveled miles to your table and you're getting all of nature's nutrients at their peak.

So how hard is it to grow a vegetable garden? This week on “Take Care,” Marie Iannotti recommends five healthy vegetables that are also easy to grow for the modest gardener. Iannotti is a longtime master gardener, a former Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulture educator, master gardener program coordinator, and a member of the Garden Writer's Association and The Garden Conservancy. She's the author of two gardening books and is the gardening expert at About.com.

Nurses who provide care to cancer patients do some of the most emotionally difficult work there is in medicine. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview Pattie Jakel, a clinical nurse specialist in the Oncology Program at the UCLA Santa Monica Hospital in California. They discuss the ethical dilemmas oncology nurses often confront.

Chewing tobacco means big league risks

May 17, 2015
Ben Roffer / Flickr

As baseball season gets underway, there's a revival of not only hot dogs, but chewing tobacco. Baseball’s history with chewing tobacco began early on, when players sought to keep their mouths from getting dry due to hot, dusty conditions. What are the dangers of chewing tobacco and other forms of smokeless tobacco, and why has it been overlooked even as society clamps down on cigarettes?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Pfister discusses the dangers chewing tobacco has on the mouth area and the entire body. Pfister is the chief of the head and neck oncology service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.

Nail salon safety: how to avoid a foot bath faux pas

May 17, 2015
FoundryParkInn / Flickr

A visit to the nail salon is a time to relax, decompress and spruce up your digits, but don't think you're out of the water (or foot bath) just yet. Have you considered the safety of your visit?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Dana Stern talks about nail salon safety and how to avoid catching fungal infections. Stern is assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City.

Chewing tobacco is one of the oldest methods of consuming tobacco. And even as American society has clamped down on the use of cigarettes, the various forms of smokeless tobacco on the market don't get nearly as much attention. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care,"  hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview Dr. David Pfister, chief of the Head and Neck Oncology Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City about why this kind of tobacco is so dangerous.

Do you know what's in your herbal supplements?

May 10, 2015
jdurchen / Flickr

When you buy herbal supplements, are you really getting what you pay for? Is the label accurate?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Arthur Grollman talks about herbal supplements. Grollman is a professor of pharmacological sciences, a professor of experimental medicine and director of the Zickler Laboratory of Chemical Biology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Robert S. Donovan / Flickr

With warm weather finally here again, experts say it’s important to find the best way to protect your skin from the sun’s harmful rays.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Emmy Graber discusses what kind of sunscreen to buy and the benefits of using it. Graber is an assistant professor of dermatology at the Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center.

Herbal supplements: how regulated are they?

May 8, 2015

Vitamins and supplements are big business in the U.S. But herbal supplements have recently come under scrutiny amid accusations that sometimes they do not even contain the herb they are advertised to. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview Dr. Arthur Grollman, professor of pharmacological sciences and experimental medicine at Stony Brook University, bout exactly how herbal supplements are -- or are not -- regulated by the government.

How to mother a child who's not a kid anymore

May 3, 2015
Callum Baker / Flickr

As a mother, when your children have reached their 20s and have left the nest, how do you find the balance between giving them their independence while still parenting?

This week on “Take Care,” Harriet Lerner discusses mothering a young adult. Lerner is a psychologist and author of the bestselling book “The Dance of Anger.”   

matt kornatz / Flickr

Historically speaking, the heel has always been a soft spot. If you find you've got a pain occurring in the heel -- whether it's when you’ve gotten up in the morning or after you’re done exercising -- it might be plantar fasciitis.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Navan Duggal talks about plantar fasciitis, who it affects and what people can do to ease their discomfort. Duggal is former chief of the Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Service at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and is currently in private practice at Syracuse Orthopedic Surgeons.

Mothers of 20-somethings have to negotiate a new relationship with a child who's not a child anymore. But may still expect mom to "take care of things" in a crisis situation. This week on “Take Care,” WRVO's health and wellness show, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with psychologist and author Harriet Lerner. They began by asking her whether mothers should feel responsible for how independent -- or dependent -- their adult children are.

Chris Enn / Flickr

Spring time means a return to the outdoors and spring cleaning. Unfortunately, spring cleaning or other home improvement projects sometimes result in trips to the emergency room or even death.

This week on “Take Care,” hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp discuss home improvement injuries with Dr. Ryan Stanton. Stanton is an emergency physician at Baptist Health in Lexington, Kentucky.

Prevention is key to avoiding mold in the home

Apr 26, 2015
additionpictures / Flickr

Mold isn't just an eyesore, it can also damage the structural integrity of your home and negatively impact your health. A hidden leak or humid basement can quickly become a serious (and seriously expensive) problem.

This week on “Take Care,” Bob Vila discusses how mold is caused and how to prevent it in the home. Vila is the TV-handyman host of “This Old House” on PBS and author of “Bob Vila’s Complete Guide to Remodeling Your Home.”

Home improvement can equal health risks

Apr 24, 2015
Collin Anderson / Flickr

As winter turns to spring, a homeowner's thoughts turns to home improvement. But those needed chores around the house and yard come with the risk of injury. This week on “Take Care,” WRVO's health and wellness show, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Ryan Stanton, emergency physician and medical director at University of Kentucky Good Samaritan Hospital about the most common home improvement injuries.

frankieleon / Flickr

Dealing with a major medical crisis in your life is stressful enough. But suppose something goes wrong, and the outcome isn't what you had expected? When does a patient move from being merely disgruntled and dissatisfied to seriously considering a lawsuit?

This week on “Take Care,” Chris Stern Hyman discusses medical malpractice and its principles. Hyman is a healthcare attorney, former litigator and founder of Medical Mediation Group in New York City.

The myths of detox diets

Apr 19, 2015
Marilyn M / Flickr

Can mixing cayenne pepper, lemon juice, syrup and water help flush out toxins from your body? Can detoxing help weight loss?

This week on “Take Care,” Susan Moores discusses the negative effects detox diets have on the body. Moores is a registered dietician and former national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

Why energy drinks aren't your average cup of joe

Apr 12, 2015
Tambako the Jaguar / Flickr

Caffeine gets many people through the day. An increasingly popular form of caffeine comes in energy drinks, but when consumed in large doses, it can pack quite a punch – sometimes a dangerous one. How do you know if you have consumed too much caffeine? When is it time to stop?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Kathleen Miller discusses the dangers of energy drinks and their effects on the body. Miller is a senior research scientist and assistant professor in sociology at the University at Buffalo.

Inside the ambulance: from dispatch to hospital

Apr 12, 2015
Penn State / Flickr

When you hear those high pitched sirens coming from the road, you know someone somewhere is being transported to a local hospital or urgent care center. There’s a lot of science that goes into those transports to ensure their safety and efficiency.

This week on “Take Care,” Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Scott Matin on how ambulances and their crews operate. Matin is a 25-year veteran of emergency medical services and vice president of clinical, education and business services for MONOC Mobile Health Services in Wall Township, New Jersey.

Potential risks of energy drinks underestimated

Apr 10, 2015
Mike Mozart / Flickr

Energy drinks have become increasingly popular in the last 15 years, becoming a staple on college campuses. But are they safe? And how do they impact the health of teens and young adults? This week on Take Care, WRVO's health and wellness show, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Kathleen Miller, a senior research scientist at the University at Buffalo, who has extensively researched the effects of energy drinks.

Cataract surgery's ease and success surprises many

Mar 29, 2015
National Eye Institute

If you've ever driven an old car with cloudy headlights, you know that the amount of light that passes through the lens is reduced. This is the basic principle behind cataracts in the human eye, and most are related to aging.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Chang explains how a cataract forms and what cataract surgery is like, along the benefits of the procedure. Chang, one of the world’s top cataract surgeons, is a clinical professor of optometry at the University of California San Francisco and author of “Cataracts: A Patient’s Guide to Treatment.”

Have you ever wondered how to revamp your eating habits during cold and flu season to strengthen your immune system? There are five simple foods you can add to your diet to help you reach immune health and achieve nutritional balance.

This week on “Take Care,” Michelle Dudash discusses immune boosting foods. Dudash is a registered dietician, a Cordon Bleu-certified chef and the author of “Clean Eating for Busy Families: Get Meals on the Table in Minutes with Simple and Satisfying Whole-Foods Recipes You and Your Kids Will Love.”

Getting to the guts of the matter of 'gut health'

Mar 22, 2015
James Joel / Flickr

If you watch television, you probably have seen commercials advertising products that claim to help improve your “gut health.” The idea of healthy and unhealthy bacteria in a person’s digestive tract has been around for a while, but researchers are learning more all the time about the connection between gut health and overall health.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Rajeev Jain, chief of gastroenterology at Texas Heath Dallas, discusses gut flora and how to maintain good gut health. Jain is also a partner at Texas Digestive Disease Consultants and clinical assistant professor of medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School.

Kidney stone basics, including some ways to avoid them

Mar 22, 2015
SoulSoap / Flickr

Often described as the worst pain imaginable aside from child birth, kidney stones can seemingly happen to anyone. But what is a kidney stone? How is it formed? Is passing one as painful as they say? More importantly, is there any way to prevent kidney stone altogether?

Joining us on “Take Care” to talk about the basics of kidney stones and how to prevent them is Dr. Glenn Preminger. Preminger is a professor of surgery and chief of the division of urology at Duke University.

No 'gut health,' no glory

Mar 20, 2015

The idea of healthy and unhealthy bacteria in the digestive tract has been around for a while. But lately the balance between the two has become popularly referred to "gut health." what does that mean and how does that affect your overall health? This week on “Take Care,” WRVO's health and wellness show, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Rajeev Jain, chief of gastroenterology at Texas Heath Dallas, to explain why we should care about what's going on in our gut.

quinn.anya / Flickr

Only four percent of people experience chronic migraines. But all migraine sufferers can have life-long recurrences, often beginning at puberty and affecting those between 35 and 45 years old.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Mark Green talks about what causes migraines and how to manage them. Green is the director of the Center for Headache and Pain Medicine and professor of neurology and anesthesiology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. 

Oliver Symens / Flickr

Keeping track of health information for children and the elderly has always been a complicated task. Care for these groups has slowly moved to the Internet to make their personal information easier to manage and access by their loved ones. But does that convenience endanger the privacy of their information at all?

This week on “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen talk to Jonathan Schwartz about the benefits of using a new website to manage loved ones’ health information. Schwartz is the co-founder and chief executive officer of CareZone, an online service that enables families to organize care of their relatives.

The basics of migraine, chronic or not

Mar 15, 2015

Migraines are painful, they come on suddenly and they're more common than you think. But there are ways to manage triggers and treat the condition effectively.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Mark Green talks about what causes migraines and how to manage them. Green is the director of the Center for Headache and Pain Medicine and professor of neurology and anesthesiology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

Creating a Carezone of health information

Mar 13, 2015

  Managing personal information is a constant problem in the digital age. And managing health information for yourself or a loved one is especially hard because it can be sensitive. This week on “Take Care,” WRVO's health and wellness show, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with the former CEO of Sun Microsystems Jonathan Schwartz. He founded the website CareZone, which provides a safe place to store medical history and share it with family members.

Lorraine  Rapp: Why is there a need to manage family care giving on line?

Eddie Codel / Flickr

Right now, wearable health technology is all the rage, with many people tracking things like their steps, activity levels and body movements. But soon these devices could used not just for fitness but as medical tools that could change how illnesses are diagnosed and treated.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Michael Blum talks about wearable health technology. Blum is a cardiologist and clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco and heads up the university’s Center for Digital Health Innovation as associate vice chancellor for informatics.

Pages