Take Care

Saturday at 6:30 a.m. and Sunday at 6:30 pm

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email both Linda, Lorraine and the show producers at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

WRVO allows republishing of Take Care web posts at no charge, with the following provisions:  a) no editing of scripts, graphics or audio is allowed;  b) "WRVO Public Media" shall be credited on the republished post; and c) notification of intent to republish a post is emailed to TakeCare@wrvo.org.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

A safe and happy holiday is within reach

Dec 9, 2017
Isabell Hubert / flickr

The much-anticipated holiday season is full of joy, but it’s also full of dashing through the snow to the mall with a cold to get some last-minute gifts. It’s seeing relatives you wished you could spend time with more often and some you wish you could write off altogether. And while setting up your Christmas light display makes the grandkids happy, it also means getting up on your very steep roof.

Like anything, the holiday season has pros and cons. In this holiday special, we’ll try to get you off on the right foot. Whether it’s staying healthy, keeping track of your finances in this busy spending time, or focusing on the positive when you’re hosting 20 relatives for dinner -- there are ways to start off 2018 relatively unscathed. First, we’ll focus on physical health.

For most people the holidays are a happy and healthy time, but some people do end up in the emergency room. Injuries seen in emergency facilities around the holidays include falls, cuts and back pain, among others. Most occur because, around the holidays, people are doing things they don't normally -- like reaching for heavy boxes in the attic.

This week on a special hour-long edition of "Take Care," we examine some holiday-related injuries with Dr. Michael Boniface, an emergency room doctor at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida.

Rubbertoe (Robert Batina) / Flickr

Most contact sports today require players to wear a helmet. Cyclists and skiers wear them to protect from serious injury if they fall. While helmet technology has come a long way, there is still a push to make sure that they are providing as much protection as possible.

Dr. Stefan Duma is a professor of engineering and the founding director of the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest Center for Injury Biomechanics. Duma joins us to discuss his research and the STAR safety rating system given to hockey and football helmets.

Concussions early in life could have lasting effects

Dec 2, 2017
bucaorg (Paul Burnett) / Flickr

When it comes to playing sports, professionals aren’t the only ones taking hits to the head. Kids and teens are also taking hard hits that could have a lasting impact later in life. While new technology can help minimize concussions, there is no sure way to prevent them.  

Dr. Barry Kosofsky joins us this week to discuss new methods in concussion diagnosis and to provide an update on the latest effects of traumatic brain injury. Kosofsky is the director of the Pediatric Concussion Clinic at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian Hospital. He's a top expert on concussions.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr

Anyone who has played a contact sport, like football or hockey, has had to wear a helmet. The same is true for other sports, like cycling and skiing. Helmets reduce the risk of severe head trauma if an injury does occur. Helmets worn by football players in the 1920s were made of leather and provided little protection. Today, helmets have several layers of padding, surrounded by a plastic or polycarbonate shell. 

Orthorexia: When healthy eating becomes dangerous

Nov 25, 2017
Marco Verch / Flickr

Many people have heard of anorexia nervosa, the eating disorder related to restricting the amount you eat, but many people haven’t heard of orthorexia. Orthorexia refers to compulsive healthy eating. While it isn’t clinically diagnosed yet, healthcare professionals are pushing for more research due to the problems it may cause.

Dr. Rebecca Sokal and Dr. Yon Park are fourth year psychiatry residents at the University of Maryland Sheppard Pratt Health System. Sokal and Park presented their research on orthorexia at the American Psychiatric Association meeting in 2017. They join us today to discuss the disorder and why further research is important.

Stacey Spensley / Flickr

Chia Pets and chia seeds have been a gag gift staple for decades, but are they a kitchen staple in your home? Chia seeds can be used to boost the nutritional value or as a replacement of foods you eat every day. Registered dietician Megan Ware, who founded Nutrition Awareness, joins us to discuss this superfood and how we can incorporate it into our everyday diet.

Can 'clean eating' be taken too far?

Nov 24, 2017
Sebastian Celis / Flickr

Most of us have heard of the eating disorder anorexia. Not as familiar is the term orthorexia, which is characterized by an obsession with proper nutrition, food quality and healthy eating. For someone fixated on "clean eating" avoidance of what they perceive as "unhealthy" food can result in the development of extreme, restrictive diets. 

Managing diabetes at school

Nov 18, 2017
Alan Levine / Flickr

Many students only see their school nurse when they are faking a headache to get out of class, but some of their classmates rely on the nurse to manage their health throughout the day. School nurses play a vital role in assisting students with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes through the day, especially as Type 2 diabetes in on the rise as childhood obesity rates increase.

Margaret Pellizzari is a diabetes educator and registered nurse who joins us on "Take Care" to discuss how childhood diabetes is managed in school.

tkraska / Flickr

As adults, we know to make sure we're taking care of ourselves and reducing our risk for things like heart disease, heart attack and stroke. But a recent study found one group of children may be more at risk due to their social and economic status. The study found that disadvantaged children have a thicker carotid artery wall -- which can lead to things like heart disease and other problems later in life.

Dr. Clyde Yancy is the chief of cardiology in the Department of Medicine at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. He joins us today to clear up the study’s findings and discuss how we can give all children the opportunity to be healthy.

How school nurses handle kids with diabetes

Nov 17, 2017
Sprogz / Flickr

The role of the school nurse has changed over the last few decades. Childhood obesity is on the rise and so are the number of kids with Type 2 diabetes. That means school nurses often have to administer insulin and other medications on a daily basis. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen talk with Margaret Pellizzari, a registered nurse and diabetes educator. Pellizzari is also program coordinator and assistant nurse manager in pediatric endocrinology at Cohen Children’s Medical Center on Long Island, New York.

Smartphone-related hand injuries and how to reduce them

Nov 11, 2017
Hamaza Butt / Flickr

Repeated use of anything can cause wear and tear including your smartphone. Continued scrolling and tapping can wear down the tendons in your hand and wrist causing injury. Repetitive use injuries are common in older adults but health professionals are seeing injury in younger patients as the age smartphone use decreases. 

Dr. Daniel Polatsch, an orthopedic hand surgeon and co-director of the New York Hand and Wrist Center of Lenox Hill, joins us this week to discuss how extended use of smartphones can cause injury and how to reduce the risk of it.

Online database makes medical studies more available

Nov 11, 2017
Sebastian / Flickr

Traditional medical journals allow doctors and researchers to find information on different medical conditions. These articles might take months or even years to publish, after a critical review process, and the journals in which their published often carry high subscription costs.

One doctor is trying to change the way medical information is published. Dr. John Adler, the neurosurgeon who invented the Cyberknife system, has created a new website to make it easier for doctors to publish and look up case studies or medical articles. He joins us today to discuss Cureus.com and how it’s changing the way people access medical information.

CPR: Why it's important to be up to date on training

Nov 4, 2017
Adrian Midgley / Flickr

Someone collapses and goes into cardiac arrest in public, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is crucial for that persons survival yet only one in five adults are current on CPR training. And training may not be as available to some people as it is to others.

Our guest Dr. Benjamin Abella is a professor of emergency medicine and the director of the Center for Resuscitation Science at the University of Pennsylvania. He joins us to discuss how CPR affects survival rates in patients who go into cardiac arrest and how important it is that you are trained.

Alcohol and its effect on your liver

Nov 4, 2017
Simon Scarfe / Flickr

Your liver works hard to rid your body of toxins that may come from your diet and the environment. One of those toxins is very common and is willingly ingested on a regular basis. Alcohol, if consumed in moderation, doesn’t pose any risk to your liver. Excessive drinking, though, over long periods of time, can cause problems.

Dr. Shannon Bailey, a professor of pathology and environmental health sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham joins us today to discuss how alcohol affects the liver in the long term.

Why don't more people know CPR?

Nov 3, 2017
Tommy Campbell Photography / American Heart Association 2017

If someone near you required had a cardiac event and needed CPR, would you know how to do it? If so, you would be part of just 20 percent of adults that are trained in CPR. If it's such an important lifesaving skill, why don't more people learn how it's done? This week on WRVO’s health and wellness show Take Care, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen talk with Dr. Benjamin Abella, director of the Center for Resuscitation Science at the University of Pennsylvania.

How long joint replacements actually last

Oct 28, 2017
tompickenfrets / Flickr

Major surgery may be a last resort for most people but for those who suffer from joint pain, cartilage lo­ss, and limited mobility, a replacement surgery may be exactly what they are looking for. Knee, hip, and shoulder replacements are the most popular in the United State but the question of how long these artificial joints last still remains.

Joining us today is Dr. Richard Iorio, an orthopedic surgeon and the chief of adult reconstruction at New York University Langone Hospital for Joint Diseases to discuss the longevity of joint replacements and the risks that may come with them.

The benefits of weight training

Oct 28, 2017
slgckgc / Flickr

Thirty minutes of aerobic activity is the well-known secret to staying healthy and fit -- even as you age -- but many forget about weight or strength training. Adding strength training to your aerobic exercise, or starting in general, could help reduce other health issues.

Dr. Stuart Phillips, the director of the Physical Activity Center of Excellence (PACE) as well as the McMaster Center for Nutrition, Exercise, and Health joins us to discuss why it is important to incorporate weight training into your exercise routine as you age.

Lena / Flickr

Many people may need joint replacement surgery at some point in their lives. While it usually involves a long recovery, it can be worth it for those living with chronic pain. But artificial joints can and do wear out, which could lead to more surgeries down the road. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen talk with Dr. Richard Iorio,  an orthopedic surgeon and Chief of Adult Reconstruction at NYU Langone Hospital for Joint Diseases.

New blood test calculates risk for preterm birth

Oct 21, 2017
summerbl4ck / Flickr

You're pregnant! While you may have a lot of questions, one of the most important is when you'll meet this new baby. You get the news at one of your first doctors appointments and rush home to mark your due date on the calendar, tell your family and friends, and begin one of the most important count downs of your life. Usually, you rely on that date as being the start of your new lives together.

One in ten babies in the United States is born prematurely, though, and while some women are more likely to deliver pre-term, most women don’t show any symptoms. Dr. Jill Hechtman the medical director of Tampa Obstetrics. She joins us this week to discuss a new test that could help predict the likelihood of a woman delivering early.

Unlocking tips for a longer and healthier life

Oct 21, 2017
mmtzphoto / Flickr

One doctor doesn’t want you to be his patient. As a medical oncologist and palliative care specialist at the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Edward Creagan sees patients fighting for their life every day. Joining us to discuss his book "How Not to Be My Patient: A Physician's Secret for Staying Healthy and Surviving Any Diagnosis," Creagan also reveals some of his tips for living longer and healthier lives.

Could a blood test predict preterm labor?

Oct 20, 2017
Thirteen Of Clubs / via Flickr

When a woman gets pregnant, she's often given a due date at one of her first doctor's appointments. But for some women, their baby comes early. About 1 in 10 women go into preterm labor, and many of those women don't show any symptoms before it happens. But could a new blood test predict whether a woman might experience preterm labor? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen talk with Dr.

Not just for show: Tattoos and medicine

Oct 14, 2017
Sophia Charlotte / Flickr

The body modification trend has seen an uptick in people getting decorative tattoos. Tattoos have a long history of being used for not only decoration, but a symbol of status, determining ownership of slaves, and to punish criminals. Despite the long history, questions of tattoo safety still remain. 

Joining us is Dr. Bruce Katz, director of the Cosmetic Surgery & Laser Clinic at Mount Sinai Hospital, to discuss tattoo safety, removal and new uses in medicine.

Toshiyuki IMAI / Flickr

Dry skin, hair, and nails are common, but if it is not something you’re used to dealing with it could be leading to more serious problems. Dryness can be caused by any number of things including how you take care of yourself, the products you use, or your environment.

Joining us is Dr. Rosemarie Ingleton, who is an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital and a clinical instructor of dermatology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, to discuss what could be causing dryness.

NIAID / Flickr

You do everything you can to protect your children and this includes vaccinating against any illness they might encounter. Most states mandate that your child gets the meningitis ACWY vaccine. While this will protect your child against most strands of meningitis, it doesn’t account for bacterial meningitis or meningitis B.

Patti Wukovits, a registered nurse, thought she had her daughter covered when she received the vaccine mandated by New York state law. Wukovits’ daughter Kimberly came home from school with common symptoms of the flu, the next day she was admitted to the hospital for meningitis B. Kimberly passed away three days before her high school graduation. Patti established the Kimberly Coffey Foundation in her honor.

Joining us is Patti Wukovits and Dr. Allan Tunkel, associate dean for medical education at the Warren Alpert School of Brown University, to discuss not only Kimberly’s story, but the effects this disease can have on the young adult population.

The dangers of meningitis: one mother's story

Oct 6, 2017
Partha S. Sahana / Flickr

Meningitis is a disease most people are vaccinated against, and is often treatable if contracted. But it's still a very serious disease, and in some cases it can be deadly. This week on Take Care, WRVO's health and wellness show, we hear the story of one woman who lost her daughter to meningitis. 

Michael Stern / Flickr

Increased protein in your diet can help aid in weight loss and build muscle mass, and while most of us get plenty of protein each day, one group isn’t getting enough of it. A recent review challenging the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) says that elderly and critically ill patients aren't getting enough protein to combat muscle loss.

Dr. Stuart Phillips, a Professor at McMaster University, and director of the Physical Activity Centre of Excellence (PACE), joins us today to discuss his review in Frontiers in Nutrition challenging the RDA on protein intake guidelines (RDA is established by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences).

Protein-packed breakfasts without the eggs

Sep 30, 2017
WordShore / Flickr

Frequently referred to as the most important meal of the day, there can be no question that a well-balanced breakfast is an important health consideration. And another important consideration -- getting enough protein.

Eggs are one breakfast selection guaranteed to pack a protein punch, but are they the only way to start your day with protein? To find out, “Take Care” spoke with Johannah Sakimura, a registered dietician and nutritionist for the Atlantic Health System, with a master’s degree in nutrition from Columbia.

Are elderly people getting enough protein?

Sep 29, 2017
gaspi *yg / Flickr

Many people have started to add more protein to their diets in recent years, either to build more muscle or lose weight. But research shows that elderly adults -- especially those who are critically ill -- need more protein than what is recommended. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen talk with Stuart Phillips, a professor at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, who published a review challenging the current recommendations.

Sleep plays a vital role in memory retention

Sep 23, 2017
Owlpacino / Flickr

Your memory is getting worse. If you don't write it down you can forget to do everyday tasks like picking up groceries or the kids after school. You chalk it up to stress or getting older, but your sleeping habits could be affecting your memory as well. 

Dr. Phyllis Zee is a professor in neurology and chief of the division of sleep medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. She joins us today to discuss the impact sleep has on your memory.

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