Take Care

Sunday evenings at 6:30 pm

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email both Linda, Lorraine and the show producers at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

WRVO allows republishing of Take Care web posts at no charge, with the following provisions:  a) no editing of scripts, graphics or audio is allowed;  b) "WRVO Public Media" shall be credited on the republished post; and c) notification of intent to republish a post is emailed to TakeCare@wrvo.org.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

How to prevent blood clots during travel

Aug 30, 2015
Christopher Doyle / Flickr

Blood clots can serve a lifesaving function, but they also can be deadly if they form when a person has been immobile for a long period of time. The problem is most common on a long plane flight or car trip when people might be sitting in the same cramped position for several hours.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Menaka Pai, a hematologist at the Hamilton General Hospital in Hamilton, Ontario, about why blood clots form and why they can put your life at risk. Pai is also an executive member of the organization Thrombosis Canada.

Are Fido & Fluffy disturbing your sleep?

Aug 30, 2015
Andy / Flickr

Sometimes, no matter how well trained a pet might be, it simply doesn’t want to sleep at any convenient time, keeping you up throughout the night.

This week on “Take Care,” Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with Dr. Lois Krahn, a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist at their Sleep Disorders Center in Arizona, on why some pets might be disturbing their owner’s sleep.

bandita / Flickr

It is human nature to squat when defecating. It was not until the invention of the modern-day toilet that humans started to sit upright for waste elimination. A new invention, the Squatty Potty, is bringing back that natural human instinct.

Dr. Rajeev Jain joins “Take Care,” this week to talk about the Squatty Potty and whether or not it really helps. Jain is the chief of gastroenterology at Texas Heath Dallas and a partner at Texas Digestive Disease Consultants.

Why long flights can lead to blood clots

Aug 28, 2015

Between weather and security concerns, commercial air travel can seem more and more difficult. But there's also a health concern associated with very long flights if you are unable to move around -- blood clots. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Menaka Pai, a professor of medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, about how blood clots form and why they can be deadly. Dr. Pai is also an executive member of the organization Thrombosis Canada.

Skley / Flickr

Each generation has their differences. Times change and people adapt but one thing that has always seemed to remain consistent is love.

Dr. Karl Pillemer, a professor of human development at Cornell, joins “Take Care,” this week to discuss his new book, “30 Lessons for Loving: Advice from the Wisest Americans on Love, Relationship and Marriage,” and how love has lasted throughout the generations.

Omega 3 fatty acids 'essential' for human body

Aug 23, 2015
Jo Christian Oterhals / Flickr

Omega 3 fatty acids are labeled as “essential,” meaning it’s something the human body needs, but can’t make itself. This means the only way to get Omega 3s is by eating certain foods.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Kerri-Ann Jennings about Omega 3s. Jennings is a registered dietician, nutritionist, as well as former editor for Eating Well Magazine.

Wellness tourism taking the vacation world by storm

Aug 16, 2015
Villa Amor / Flickr

In the past, vacations were ways for many to shed responsibilities and relax. That trend, however, seems to be as old as Disney World, as the idea of wellness trips slowly take over the vacation scene.

This week on “Take Care,” print, television, and digital journalist Ismat Sarah Mangla talks about the new travelling trend and what fuels people to be active during their vacations.

Summer woes: brain freeze and dark clothing

Aug 16, 2015
Jereme Rauckman / Flickr

Brain freeze. Most people have had one of these so-called “ice cream headaches,” but how do they happen, and why doesn’t everybody get them?

This week on “Take Care” we talk to Dr. Mark Green, director of the Center for Headache and Pain Medicine and professor of neurology and anesthesiology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

The uniqueness of diverticulitis and how to treat it

Aug 16, 2015
euthman / Flickr

In the medical field, the suffix ‘-itis' stands for inflammation. Bronchitis, laryngitis, etc., are all inflammatory medical problems.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Rajeev Jain tackles the unique inflammatory condition, diverticulitis. Jain is the chief of gastroenterology at Texas Heath Dallas and a partner at Texas Digestive Disease Consultants.

Betty Nudler / Flickr

Taking a vacation and a break from the stresses of everyday life may seem like a healthy thing to do in and of itself. But recently a new trend has emerged called wellness tourism. It incorporates a range of ways to get healthy while you travel. This week, On WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with journalist Ismat Sarah Mangla of International Business Times. Mangla has written about the growing business of wellness tourism.

How seperating work and play can help prevent burnout

Aug 9, 2015
Hawk Wind / Flickr

Burnout is all too common for those in the work force. From emails to text messages, the line between work and home has blurred to the point where there almost isn’t one.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Ron Friedman addresses the topic of workplace burnout and how to counter the effects with ways to stay satisfied and engaged during the work week and bring the separation between work and home back.

Uncovering the mystery behind varicose veins

Aug 9, 2015
Warren Flick / Flickr

We all know that person who, when upset, has that neck vein that bulges and pulses uncontrollably. Although unsightly and intimidating, we have come to accept and expect to see those veins at times, but veins that bulge permanently are a different story.

Varicose veins are common and bulge in quite the same way, yet they remain shrouded in mystery for some people.

Dr. Jennifer Heller, assistant professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and director of the Johns Hopkins Vein Centers, joins “Take Care” this week to address varicose veins and uncover the mystery behind these bulging blood vessels.

In a world with 24-7 accessibility, sometimes it's hard to unplug from your job. But too much stress at work can be bad for your overall health. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with social psychologist Ron Friedman about how to promote well being and boost productivity at the same time. Friedman is also the author of the book, "The Best Place to Work: The Art and Science of Creating an Extraordinary Workplace."

Avoiding the dreaded traveler's diarrhea

Aug 2, 2015
maaco / flickr

Traveler’s diarrhea. It’s something not everybody can avoid, no matter how hard they try. But why do some contract this ailment even when taking all the necessary precautions not to?

This is the focus on this week’s “Take Care,” where we talk to Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky about how sometimes, no matter how cautious you might, be “Montezuma’s Revenge” can still strike.

Kozarsky is a professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Emory University School of Medicine, and medical director of TravelWell, a clinic that serves international travelers. She is also a co-founder of the International Society of Travel Medicine and an expert consultant on travelers’ health with the CDC.

jfingas / Flickr

Technology has always been the way of the future. The medical field, typically known for its advanced medical technology, has adopted a new form of service:  mobile.

This week on “Take Care,” health and technology reporter Jennifer Jolly discusses smartphone apps that can bring the doctor’s office to the patients. Jolly recently authored an article for The New York Times Well blog about the mobile doctor apps and how they are changing the medical field.

Doctor house calls go high-tech

Jul 31, 2015
CNBP / Flickr

The idea of the old-fashioned doctor house call has gone high-tech. Now, there are smart phone apps to schedule a home doctor visit or video conference call with a medical practitioner. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak to health and technology reporter Jennifer Jolly about what's driving this trend. Jolly writes the Wired Well column for the New York Times Well blog.

How to survive the wilderness

Jul 26, 2015
Al_HikesAZ / Flickr

Lost in the wilderness, people tend to make things worse for themselves by trying to find their way out, or looking aimlessly for food. Yet staying calm and staying put might guarantee your safety faster than anything else.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Christopher McStay, chief of clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. McStay was also the former chief of service for the Bellevue Hospital Emergency Department in New York City, where he treated patients who have survived extreme circumstances such as Hurricane Irene and Superstorm Sandy.

The reality of contact lenses

Jul 26, 2015
Andy Simmons / Flickr

Contact lenses have become a cultural norm as more and more people make the switch from glasses to contacts. But are people using these lenses correctly, and do they know exactly how these lenses even work?

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to contact lens expert Dr. Bryan Lee, a cornea, cataract and Lasik specialist, whose practice is located in Los Altos, California. Lee is also a member of the Council of American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Hiking in the woods and mountains is a popular activity. But if you take the wrong fork in the trail and get lost, a day of recreation can turn into an exercise in staying safe. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak to Dr. Christopher McStay, chief of clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the University of Colorado. They discuss the basics of surviving in the wilderness for the average person.

Blue Zones residents living longer, healthier lives

Jul 19, 2015
Ed Schipul / Flickr

Roughly one in 5,000 people in the United States lives to be 100 years old, yet there are concentrated places in the world where living to 100 is not unusual, and people manage to live this long without contracting any preventable diseases. These areas, called “Blue Zones,” are located in Ikaria, Greece; Okinawa, Japan; Ogliastra Region, Sardinia; Loma Linda, California; and Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to National Geographic Explorer Dan Buettner, who has traveled the globe to uncover the longevity secrets used in these Blue Zones, how these people are able to live for such a remarkably long time. Buettner recently released his latest book, “The Blue Zones Solution: Eating and Living Like the World’s Healthiest People.”

Hot dogs and hamburgers: the truth about the meat we buy

Jul 19, 2015
Chris H / Flickr

According to the National Sausage and Hot Dog Council, during peak hotdog season, Americans typically consume 7 billion hot dogs. But what exactly is in these hotdogs that people buy at the supermarket, and is it healthy for people to be eating so many of them?

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Kerri-Ann Jennings about what exactly is in the meat of the hot dogs and hamburgers that we eat. Jennings is a registered dietician and nutritionist, as well as former editor for Eating Well Magazine.

WXXI News

Six-year-old Jason Green is spending his afternoon at the dentist’s office, but his focus is on the many stickers he is earning by behaving during the appointment.

“Well, I have been really good,” Jason beams, holding a stack of adhesive monster truck drawings.

To live longer, live like you're in a 'Blue Zone'

Jul 17, 2015
almekri01 / Flickr

It seems everyone is looking for a secret to living a long, healthy life. But Dan Buettner, a National Geographic explorer and author has traveled the world to find it.

This week on WRVO's health and wellness program "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak to Buettner about why a higher percentage of people in what he calls "Blue Zones" live to be 100 years old without preventable diseases.

Support for this story comes from The Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

How to avoid dehydration throughout the summer

Jul 12, 2015
faungg / Flickr

Water and summer go together like peanut butter and jelly. From the ocean to backyard pools, water tends to be a way of life for most during hot weather. But while everyone is having fun many forget how important it is to drink water as well.

This week on “Take Care,” health expert Johannah Sakimura talks about the importance of staying hydrated during these hot summer months.

roujo / Flickr

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in both men and women in the United States, but the number of heart disease related deaths has declined over the past 50 years and continues to do so.

This week on “Take Care,” New York Times health and science reporter Gina Kolata talks about the minor changes hospitals have made to heart attack treatments that might have an impact on heart disease deaths in the U.S.

osseous / Flickr

The leading cause of death in the U.S. has seen an incredible drop in the last decade or so. That's because hospitals have made a series of small changes that have led to the survival of more heart attack victims. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with New York Times health and science reporter Gina Kolata about what she found were the reasons behind this change.

The link between brain disease and our gut

Jun 28, 2015
James Joel / Flickr

The hip bone is connected to the back bone. The back bone is connected to the chest bone. But is the brain connected to the gut?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Perlmutter sits down to discuss the connection between gut and brain health. Perlmutter is an associate professor at the University of Miami School of Medicine, a board-certified neurologist and fellow of the American College of Nutrition.

Kevin Krejci / Flickr

With the sun beating down during these summer months, many of us lather on some sunscreen and find relief in the nearest body of water. Pools however, often used as a shield from the sun’s harmful rays, might not be as harmless as we think.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Emmy Graber, assistant professor of dermatology at the Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, addresses chlorine and its effect on our skin and hair.

Is the brain connected to the gut?

Jun 26, 2015

In recent years, medical researchers have been discovering more about the link between gut health and overall health. This week's on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," neurologist and author Dr. David Perlmutter talks about the idea that microbes in the gut could affect neurological conditions. Dr. Perlmutter writes about explores this connection in his book “Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain – For Life.”  

More of this interview can be heard on "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show Sunday evening at 6:30 p.m.

Yale Rosen / Flickr

Lung cancer is considered the leading cause of cancer deaths among both men and women. How can it be prevented and who is more likely to get it?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Martin Edelman talks about what can cause lung cancer and who can develop it. Edelman is head of the Solid Tumor Oncology Department at the University of Maryland’s Greenebaum Cancer Center.

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