Take Care

Sunday evenings at 6:30 pm

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email both Linda, Lorraine and the show producers at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f6dae1c8bbad399ea093|5187f6c5e1c8bbad399ea079

Pages

7:01pm

Sun November 3, 2013
Health

Hepatitis C -- the "silent epidemic"

Hepatitis virions.
Microbe World Flickr

The “baby boomer” generation – Americans born between 1945 and 1965, has had a big impact on American society and culture. Now a disease is having a big effect on them. Baby boomers are five times more likely to have contracted Hepatitis C than the rest of the population. With symptoms that may not appear for decades, most may not even know they have Hepatitis C until it is too late.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Bryce D. Smith explains why all baby boomers should be tested for Hepatitis C. Dr. Smith is a lead health scientist in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Viral Hepatitis, and is the primary author of recent Hepatitis C testing recommendations that are aimed at members of the baby boomer generation.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Smith.

Read more

7:00pm

Sun November 3, 2013
Health

How to de-stress and improve your health

bottled_void Flickr

Stress is a part of everyday life, and for some people, the workplace can be a significant cause. Sometimes, when work isn’t left at work, stress from the job can bleed into your personal life and severely affect your physical health. But, dealing with work stress can be easier than people may think.

This week on Take Care, Jane Pernotto Ehrman discusses causes of stress in the workplace and ways to deal with it. Ehrman is the lead behavioral specialist at the Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Lifestyle Medicine, in the Wellness Institute, where she develops and implements the behavioral and stress management sections of lifestyle wellness programs.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Jane Pernotto Ehrman.

Read more

5:41am

Fri November 1, 2013
Health

Why baby boomers should be tested for Hepatitis C

Health providers in New York state are now required to offer a Hepatitis C test to all baby boomers. That's because about three-quarters of people who have the virus don't know they have it -- and most are in the baby boomer generation. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care” recently spoke with Dr. Bryce Smith of the Centers for Disease Control about this silent epidemic.

Lorraine Rapp: So I know there are different forms of the virus Hepatitis. This is Hepatitis C —what exactly is it and why is it so dangerous?

Read more

7:01pm

Sun October 27, 2013
Health

More salt, more problems, says expert

Judy van der Velden Flickr

If your mouth begins to water when you think about pretzels, peanuts and French fries, then you probably like salty foods. If this is true, then you are one of the many who love salt. But while some people understand that too much salt intake isn’t healthy, most don’t realize that cutting back on salt means more than just avoiding the salt shaker during meal time.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Norman Kaplan discusses salt’s effect on the body, and why people should be much more aware of how much salt they are actually taking in. Dr. Kaplan is a professor of internal medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, where he’s been on the faculty for over four decades. His book, Kaplan’s Clinical Hypertension, is currently in its 10th edition.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Kaplan.

Read more

7:00pm

Sun October 27, 2013
Health

Angina, Bob Dole, and NASCAR: How Viagra solidified its role in American society

Felix E. Guerrero Flickr

1998 brought about many things: the invention of Google, the Monica Lewinsky scandal, the Winter Olympic Games in Japan and the film Armageddon. While these events took the world by storm, one little blue pill also made its way on to the scene, and has changed how Americans view sex in the 15 years since.

This week on Take Care, sociologist Meika Loe discusses the history and the effects of the drug Viagra. Loe is an associate professor of sociology and women’s studies at Colgate University in Hamilton, N.Y., and the author of the book The Rise of Viagra: How the Little Blue Pill Changed Sex in America.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Meika Loe.

Read more

7:59am

Fri October 25, 2013
Health

Cutting back on sodium means more than just putting down the salt shaker

pboyd04 Flickr

Many health professionals recommend eating less salt. But why is too much salt bad for your health? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Norman Kaplan of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, whose textbook on high blood pressure, "Kaplan's Clinical Hypertension," is in its 10th edition.

Lorraine Rapp: So when it enters our system, what actually takes place in the body that causes it to have harmful effects on our blood pressure?

Read more

10:10am

Mon October 21, 2013
Health

Fear is in the mind of the beholder

charamelody Flickr

You’re watching a scary movie. As the suspense begins building, you notice that your heart rate increases, your pupils dilate, and you that you are beginning to sweat. Is it hot in the room? No, that’s not what’s causing it. What you’re experiencing is good ol’ fashioned fear.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Liz Phelps discusses two kinds of fear: real and fake. Dr. Phelps is the director of the Phelps Lab at NYU and a professor in psychology. Her research focuses on how human learning and memory are changed by emotion, and what neural systems mediate the interactions between the three.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Phelps.

Read more

7:00pm

Sun October 20, 2013
Health

Sugar and cavities: The "tooth" behind what causes decay

dreyboblue Flickr

Halloween wouldn’t be the same without horror films, costumes, and of course, candy. The more candy, the more successful the trick-or-treating. But when children start sorting through their sugary treasures, it may not be a bad idea to have a toothbrush on standby to help combat the real horror of Halloween — cavities.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Thomas Salinas talks about why sugar, something most people -- particularly kids -- love, can cause cavities and dental decay. Dr. Salinas is a professor of dentistry at the Mayo Clinic, a world renown medical practice and research group in Rochester, Minnesota.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Salinas.

Read more

6:26am

Fri October 18, 2013
Health

Why exactly is sugar bad for your teeth?

Steven Guzzardi Flickr

October 31 is right around the corner, and with Halloween comes candy. We've all been told, with too much candy comes cavities. But why does sugar cause tooth decay? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Thomas Salinas, professor of dentistry at the Mayo Clinic about how cavities occur and how to prevent them.

Lorraine Rapp: What is it about sugar that causes cavities?

Read more
Tags: 

7:01pm

Sun October 13, 2013
Health

How to get the most out of the modern day ER

Mark Coggins Flickr

When people hear “emergency room,” thoughts of high stress medical situations that could play out on televised shows such as ER often come to mind. While this is fitting to a certain extent, more and more people are finding themselves at the ER to deal with situations that used to be dealt with in the doctor’s office. This is because the ER has changed dramatically in more ways than one.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Leana Wen discusses how the modern ER works and how to prepare for a visit to it. Dr. Wen is an attending emergency physician and director of patient-centered care research at George Washington University, and the author of When Doctors Don’t Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary Tests.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Wen.

Read more

7:00pm

Sun October 13, 2013
Health

You can't go wrong with fall veggies

Leah Landry WRVO

What do you think of when you hear the words "fall foods?" For children, “fall foods” may mean candy corn and Halloween treats, while others may think vegetables -- things like squash, cabbage and beets. These fall under the category of autumnal vegetables, and can provide many healthy benefits to consumers of them.

This week on Take Care, nutritionist Joan Rogus talks about what makes fall vegetables good for you. Rogus is a registered dietitian in central New York who's been a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for over 25 years.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

Read more

6:59pm

Sun October 13, 2013
Health

Decluttering your home can also mean decluttering your mind

spykster Flickr

It comes in many different forms and can show up in many different places — on top of something, under something, around something, inside of something. Clutter can essentially happen just about anywhere. While this description may sound a bit scary, one psychologist insists it’s not as scary as many people may think.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio discusses how to manage clutter. Zasio is clinical psychologist who specializes in anxiety disorders. She has appeared on the A&E reality television show Hoarders, and is the author of The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Zasio.

Read more

7:59am

Fri October 11, 2013
Health

Do you know when to visit the emergency room?

File Photo
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

The emergency room has become an integral part of the American medical system. But how do you know when you should go to the E.R.? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with emergency physician Dr. Leana Wen about what you should know before you have to visit an emergency room.

Lorraine Rapp: Can you give us a quick overview of how emergency rooms have changed over the years—how it might affect us as patients?

Read more

7:01pm

Sun October 6, 2013
Health

Despite wide availability, many still not taking advantage of flu shot

itsv Flickr

Fall brings many great things—the leaves begin to change color, apples are ripe for the picking — but on the other end of the spectrum, fall also brings something that nobody looks forward to — flu season. A simple flu shot, which is easy to get, may equip people with all the immunity tools they need to fight off the flu. But surprisingly, the majority of people don’t take advantage of it.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Joseph Bresee discusses how the flu shot works and why people should get it. Dr. Bresee is the chief of the Epidemiology and Prevention Branch at the Centers for Disease Control, and helps create the yearly vaccine he believes more people should be receiving.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Joseph Bresee.

Read more

7:00pm

Sun October 6, 2013
Health

Coping with empty nest syndrome

Credit Mandy Jansen / Flickr

Leaving home for the first time can be very stressful on a child. Whether they are moving away to college or relocating for a job, the process is one of change and readjustment. But the parents who raised that child often have an even more difficult time adjusting -- resulting in what is known as empty nest syndrome.

This week on Take Care, Kimberly Key talks about why empty nest syndrome develops, and how it can be used as a motivator to positively turn someone’s life around. Key is a psychotherapist and a nationally certified counselor who specializes in holistic human development and the founder of Encompass Work & Family, which helps people evolve through life’s stages.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Kimberly Key.

Read more

7:11am

Fri October 4, 2013
Health

Unpredictability of flu season should be motivation to get shot

paulswansen Flickr

Every year at this time, public health officials encourage Americans to get a flu vaccine, but the majority of people choose not to have a flu shot. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Joseph Bresee of the Centers for Disease Control about how the vaccine works to prevent the flu, and why the CDC recommends it.

Read more

7:01pm

Sun September 29, 2013
Health

Compulsive "hoarding" caused by more than just nostalgia

Mark Knobil Flickr

Everyone has something they can’t quite let go, whether it’s all the back issues of their favorite magazine or their favorite sweater from 2003 that no longer fits. What happens when this feeling spreads to many other items as well, to the point where it starts to not only compromise your home, but your daily life as well.

The recent popularity of the A&E reality television show Hoarders has opened up a national conversation on the topic of compulsive hoarding, which many are starting to realize can be a serious psychological issue rather than just a strong feeling of nostalgia towards physical items.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio talks about compulsive hoarding and the treatment process for it. Dr. Zasio is a clinical psychologist that specializes in anxiety disorders. She has appeared on Hoarders, and is the author of the book “The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, and Uncluttered Life.”

 Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robin Zasio.

Read more

7:00pm

Sun September 29, 2013
Health

Researcher hopes "chemo brain" study can help cancer patients

Velcade chemo treatment.
tyfn Flickr

Chemotherapy is one of the best known forms of cancer treatment, and while often effective, it can leave behind a number of side effects, like hair loss and nausea. Some who have undergone chemotherapy also have claimed to have felt foggy, forgetful and not as sharp as they were before the treatment. Largely ignored by the medical community in the past, this symptom, which is referred to as “chemo brain,” is finally starting to come to the forefront in medical research.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Michelle Janelsins talks about the research she and others are now conducting on chemo brain. Janelsins is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery, Cancer Control at the University of Rochester School of Medicine, where she got her PhD.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Janelsins.

Read more

6:31am

Fri September 27, 2013
Health

New study hopes to unlock the secret to "chemo brain"

Chemotherapy can cause many side effects like hair loss and nausea. But for years, many cancer patients have said it causes something else, forgetfulness and memory loss, or what cancer survivors call "chemo brain." Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Michelle Janelsins of the University of Rochester, who is leading a research study into chemotherapy's effects on cognitive function.

Lorraine Rapp: The term “chemo brain” is relatively new. How do researchers and medical doctors actually define that term?

Read more

7:01pm

Sun September 22, 2013
Health

Year-round youth sports mean more injuries

wynner3 Flickr

Any casual sports fan knows that it’s football season. Just look at any high school on a Friday night or in the living rooms of Americans everywhere on Sundays. If you ask a child athlete when football season is though, their response may not be fall—it may be “all year.”

Year-round playing of a single sport is just one of the trends in youth athletics which have helped lead to an increase in youth sports injuries, according to Dr. Pietro Tonino. Dr. Tonino is Chief of Sports Medicine at the Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago, and a leading expert on youth sports injuries.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Pietro Tonino.

Read more

7:00pm

Sun September 22, 2013
Health

Cherries & chocolate -- not just for dessert

D. H. Wright Flickr

What do strawberries, dark chocolate and cherries all have in common? If you guessed that they all can help with your health and wellness, you are right. If you guessed that they are all delicious, we’ll give you that too.

This week on Take Care, a conversation about folk remedies with Denise Foley, an award-winning health journalist and the Contributing Executive Editor at Prevention magazine. She's the co-author of "‪The Doctors Book of Home Remedies for Children: ‪From Allergies and Animal Bites to Toothache and TV Addiction, Hundreds of Doctor-Proven Techniques and Tips to Care for Your Kid."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Denise Foley.

Read more

5:45am

Fri September 20, 2013
Health

The changing culture of youth sports

With children starting to play sports at younger ages and playing their sports year-round, the chance they are going to get injured is on the rise. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," recently spoke with Dr. Pietro Tonino, the chief of sports medicine at Loyola University in Chicago, about why these injuries are occurring and how to prevent them.

Lorraine Rapp: How has youth sports changed over the years?

Read more

7:01pm

Sun September 15, 2013
Health

Melanoma treatment breakthroughs provide hope for those in advanced stages of disease

Melanoma cancer cells.
Credit Oscar Rohena / Flickr

With early detection and treatment, melanoma is nearly 100 percent curable.  But for patients with advanced stages of melanoma, this skin cancer is often regarded as one of the most deadly forms of cancer. Now, new advances in treatment therapies have provided dramatic improvements for those whose melanoma has spread.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Lynn Schuchter, chief of hematology-oncology at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center, about how melanoma is diagnosed and the variety of treatments now available.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Lynn Schuchter.

Read more

7:00pm

Sun September 15, 2013
Health

Dads vs. cads: The biological reasons for who wins a woman's heart

zoetnet Flickr

Is love blind, or is it like a biological version of The Bachelorette? How does a woman pick her dream guy? Is it completely up to her, or is there a point in which her biological instincts take over? This week on Take Care, clinical psychologist and journalist Dr. Vinita Mehta discusses the issue most men are afraid to ask about -- how women pick their mates.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Vinita Mehta.

Read more

5:34am

Fri September 13, 2013
Health

Melanoma treatments advancing rapidly

Lorraine Rapp: If you would, walk us through what happens when a person finds out their mole or growth is malignant. Who makes that diagnosis and what are the first steps taken once a person gets the diagnosis.

Read more

7:01pm

Sun September 8, 2013
Health

Celiac disease: how it's diagnosed and treated

SliceOfChic Flickr

Celiac disease is a tricky medical disorder. When left untreated, up to 300 different symptoms can occur, and the elapsed time from the onset of those symptoms to an actual diagnosis averages about ten years.

Nancy Lapid, the managing editor for Reuters Health, and Dr. Daniel Leffler, the director of clinical research at the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, both spoke with “Take Care” about this serious disease, which many people have only heard of in recent years.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Nancy Lapid and Dr. Daniel Leffler.

Read more

7:00pm

Sun September 8, 2013
Health

Does an apple a day really keep the doctor away?

Kevin Maloney

We’ve all been told that an apple a day keeps the doctor away. In the over 150 years that saying has been around, many have taken it as common health knowledge. But are apples really that good for you?

According to Joan Rogus, a registered dietician from central New York, the reason the saying has stood the test of time is because of the truth behind it. When asked what health benefits an apple can provide, Joan believes an easier question to answer would be, “What doesn’t an apple do for us?”

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

Read more
Tags: 

5:34am

Fri September 6, 2013
Health

Celiac disease -- more than gluten intolerance

Gluten intolerance has recently become a popular nutritional catch phrase. But behind the hype of the many gluten-free products currently on the market is an actual disorder called celiac disease. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Daniel Leffler, who is the director of the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston about how the disease is diagnosed and treated.

Read more

8:34am

Sun September 1, 2013
Health

How should you make the medicine go down?

e-MagineArt.com Flickr

Capsules, chewable tablets, gel tabs -- Over-the-counter medications now come in so many different formulations, it's difficult to figure out what to take. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen....hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," Spoke to Dr. Lindsay McNair, a pharmaceutical physician and professor at the Boston University School of Public Health, about how to best take your medicine.

Lorraine Rapp: There are so many forms that these over the counter medications come in. What was behind their development?

Read more

7:01pm

Sun August 25, 2013
Health

The I-STOP law: an assemblyman's push to solve a big problem

VCU Libraries Flickr

Prescription drugs can be helpful to those that need them. But for others they can be dangerous or even deadly. This week on “Take Care,” we talk to New York State Assemblyman Michael Cusick, the lead sponsor behind a piece of legislation called I-STOP, or Internet System for Tracking Over Prescribing, which is intended to serve as a national model to end prescription painkiller abuse.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Assemblyman Cusick.

Read more

Pages