Take Care

Sunday evenings at 6:30 pm

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email both Linda, Lorraine and the show producers at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

Diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have been rising for the past 20 years. Today, 3.5 million children in the United States are on medication for the disorder. This week on WRVO’s health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Alan Schwarz, a writer for The New York Times who has reported extensively on ADHD. Schwarz discusses the rise of ADHD and how it is likely being over diagnosed.

Study shows equal marriages lack sexual spark

Mar 30, 2014
Ika Ink / Flickr

If you share the chores with your spouse, the two of you have what psychologists call a "peer marriage,” an egalitarian partnership. Maybe the husband cooks, vacuums, and loads the dishwasher, and you genuinely enjoy each other's company. But what about your sex life? The answer may reveal an unexpected outcome of modern marriage.

This week on Take Care, Lori Gottlieb, psychotherapist and author of The New York Times article “Does a More Equal Marriage Mean Less Sex?” discusses how equality in marriage can impact a couple’s sex life. Her article has triggered a national debate on why peer marriages seem to have lost that sexual spark. Gottlieb is the author of The New York Times bestseller "Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough" and three other books, as well as a contributing editor for The Atlantic.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Lori Gottlieb.

brownpau / flickr

Imagine getting a skin rash so painful that it compares to the intensity of pain associated with childbirth and kidney stones. The Center for Disease Control says that shingles can cause this kind of pain, and that one in three Americans will get it in their lifetime. Why exactly does shingles cause this kind of pain, and what is being done to prevent and treat it?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Pritish Tosh discusses the skin rash known as shingles. Dr. Tosh is assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic where he has collaborated with the Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development. He’s a leading expert on emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Tosh.

It's one of the most painful syndromes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say one in three Americans will get it eventually and those over 60 should be vaccinated. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Pritish Tosh, assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic,  about shingles and how to prevent it.

Lorraine Rapp: Let’s start at the beginning so we have a full understanding.  Exactly what is shingles?

What's the future for the nutrition facts label?

Mar 23, 2014
Dan Domme / Flickr

The Food and Drug Administration is changing the nutrition facts label for the first time since the 1990s. The changes will update the current labels, which have serving sizes that seem too small to many Americans and no prominence placed on the calories.

This week on Take Care, Tracy Fox, president of Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants in Washington D.C., discusses the current nutrition facts label and how it may be upgraded.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Tracy Fox.

Going green with juicing

Mar 23, 2014
Creative Commons via Flickr

While the taste of vegetables may turn some people off, they contain nutrients that are vital for a healthy body. Turning to popular and creative methods such as juicing or making smoothies is a quick, easy and tasty way to consume these important vegetables. This approach has become so popular in recent years that juice bars have started to open up in some cities across the country.

This week on Take Care, Yuri Elkaim talks about green drinks. Elkaim is a registered holistic nutritionist, fitness expert and health coach, as well as a former professional soccer player. He currently writes a fitness blog at U.S. News and World Report.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Yuri Elkaim.

Nutrition facts label will be changing

Mar 21, 2014

The familiar nutrition label you see on every food and drink you buy will be changing. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Tracy Fox, president of Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants in Washington D.C.  Fox discusses the current nutrition label and what changes might be coming.

Lorraine Rapp: I wondered if you would talk about how effective these labels have been in helping consumers make more informed decisions? Overall has the program been effective?

Quench your thirst for knowledge about water consumption

Mar 16, 2014
Vassilis Online / Flickr

We hear all sorts of recommendations when it comes to drinking water: drink 6-8 glasses of water a day, drink fluids when you have a cold and drink still water instead of flavored water or soda. All this advice is enough to make your head spin -- and your bladder swim.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Stanley Goldfarb discusses some common misconceptions about water consumption in part two of his interview. Goldfarb is a professor of medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. He has a specialty in renal electrolyte and hypertension, and is a leading expert in the topic of water consumption.

Click 'Read More' to hear the second part of our interview with Dr. Goldfarb.

7 foods that can take your diet to a "super" level

Mar 16, 2014
gkdavie / flickr

The word “superfood” may sound a bit intimidating, but nutritionists believe they allow people to take their healthy diets to the next level. But what makes a food “super,” and what foods actually make the cut?

This week on Take Care, Rachel Berman talks about seven superfoods that can easily be incorporated into a healthy diet. Berman is a registered dietician and the health editor at About.com. She is also the author of Boosting Your Metabolism for Dummies and Mediterranean Diet for Dummies.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Rachel Berman.

Myths about water consumption debunked

Mar 14, 2014
Some rights reserved by BaronBrian

There are many theories about water consumption: but are they true? Is carbonated water as healthy as still water? Should you drink more fluids when you have a cold ? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen,  speak with Dr. Stanley Goldfarb,  professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.  Goldfarb debunks some of the myths about drinking water in part two of his interview.

Colonoscopy important for early cancer detection

Mar 9, 2014
wellcome images via Flickr

Colonoscopies easily fall under a category of medical tests that are important to have done, but are not easy to discuss. Colonoscopies have an uncomfortable stigma, despite the fact that most patients report not having a troublesome experience with them.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Rajeev Jain discusses the importance of colonoscopies.  Dr. Jain is a partner at Texas Digestive Disease Consultants, chief of gastroenterology at Texas Health Dallas and clinical assistant professor of medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Jain.

Throwing cold water on popular theories

Mar 9, 2014
darrylh via Flickr

Water, water, everywhere. At least, that's what we've been told.

Health, nutrition, exercise and beauty experts of all kinds have said over the years that we need to consume a certain amount of water per day, that we need to drink water before and after exercise, that drinking lots of water can help you lose weight, that drinking lots of water helps the skin, and the list goes on and on.

But what’s the science behind all these claims?

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Goldfarb.

How much water does the body really need?

Mar 7, 2014
[cipher] / Flickr

Taking a water bottle to the gym or drinking a certain amount of water each day may seem like good choices.  But do they provide health benefits? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Stanley Goldfarb, professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Goldfarb explains what his research has shown about why water is so important to the body but how you may not need as much of it as you think.

It's in the blood tests

Mar 2, 2014
Kenny Holston / Flickr

Getting blood work done can tell a patient a lot of things. With thousands of different tests available, it can be the answer that unlocks a certain medical ailment. After a patient gives blood though, where does that blood go and what is done with it? How exactly does drawing blood tell us what is going on with our bodies?

This week on Take Care, Anne Marie Mullin talks about the basics of blood work. Mullin is senior vice president of Laboratory Alliance, a state-licensed lab that provides testing to a 16-county region in central New York. She was trained at the National Institute of Health, and is board certified in transfusion medicine.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Anne Marie Mullin.

wader / flickr

Some people consider social media a waste of time. But what if social media could be used to motivate positive change in people? What if social media could inspire people to make healthier choices, and even lose weight?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Tricia Leahey discusses DietBet, a social networking website that challenges users to lose weight. Leahey is an assistant professor in research at Brown Medical School and the Miriam Hospital’s Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, and is also part of the DietBetter.com’s advisory team.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Leahey.

The basics of blood work

Feb 28, 2014
Thirteen of Clubs / Flickr

If you're a patient, having your blood drawn for a medical test may be simple for you. But what's done with your blood after it ends up in the tube is probably a big mystery. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Anne Marie Mullin, senior vice president of Laboratory Alliance, a lab that provides testing to a 16-county region in central New York, to find out more about how blood tests really work.

Obsessive habits, bizarre thoughts could be OCD symptoms

Feb 23, 2014
invisiblemonsters / Flickr

Do you know someone who avoids touching door knobs or repeatedly checks to see if the stove is off? Maybe they adjust desk top objects until they are perfectly aligned. This may not be just fussy behavior. Repetitive acts like these could be a result of OCD, obsessive compulsive disorder.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio, talks about obsessive compulsive disorder. Zasio is a clinical psychologist who specializes in treating anxiety disorders at The Anxiety Treatment Center in California. She has been featured on the A&E television series “Hoarders” and is the author of "The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robin Zasio.

stevendepolo / flickr

With vegetables readily available at any grocery store, one may forget that growing them at home is even an option. While growing plants from seed takes more time and effort than just buying them, one expert believes that not only is it worth it, but it’s actually easier to do than people may think.

This week on Take Care, Amy Jeanroy talks about the basics of growing plants from seed. Jeanroy, an expert herb gardener and contributor to About.com, has written many books on the subject, including Canning and Preserving for Dummies, 2nd edition.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Jeanroy.

zen Sutherland / Flickr

Obsessive compulsive disorder is the most common anxiety disorder. At least five million Americans suffer from this disorder, which gives people obsessive thoughts. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Dr. Robin Zasio, a clinical psychologist who specializes in treating anxiety disorders. Zasio discusses obsessive compulsive disorder, and how its symptoms can affect daily life.

Cholesterol: The good, the bad, and the...wine?

Feb 16, 2014
wellcome images / flickr

Cholesterol. It’s something we need, but becomes a problem when there’s too much of it. It’s a buzzword often thrown around in advertisements for both food and medication, and something people watch out for in their diets. But what is cholesterol, and why can it be a problem?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robert S. Rosenson answers these questions and more. Dr. Rosenson is a professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and is also director of cardio-metabolic disorders at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Rosenson.

Allergy drops could mean looking forward to spring again

Feb 16, 2014
Nomadic Lass / Flickr

If you've ever used the phrase "a shot in the arm" to describe something as invigorating, you're probably not an allergy sufferer who's had to endure ongoing injections to control symptoms. Shots are not only painful but often inconvenient to schedule into a busy life. Yet that's been the standard course of treatment for many allergy patients for the past hundred years. Recent developments, however, may make shots obsolete for those who suffer from hay fever.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Linda Cox, talks about the new development of allergy drops. Cox is the president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, and an allergist and immunologist from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Cox.

New medicine may ease allergy suffering

Feb 14, 2014

For those who suffer from allergies, allergy shots are currently the best way to get symptoms under control. But a new development could change that. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Dr. Linda Cox, the president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Cox discusses allergy drops, which could potentially eliminate allergies for the user.

Diagnostic imaging: The eye for the inside

Feb 9, 2014
Rob! / Flickr

Like something straight out of science fiction, the use of diagnostic imaging allows doctors to “see” inside the human body without physically opening it up. X-rays, CT scans, ultrasounds and MRI are some of the most common kinds, but what is the difference between all of them? What situation calls for what kind of diagnostic imaging, and is there any danger in using them?

To answer these basic questions, Dr. Scott Buckingham joins us this week on Take Care. Dr. Buckingham, of CRA Medical Imaging in Syracuse, is board certified in Diagnostic Radiology and has also had training in vascular and interventional radiology.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview Dr. Scott Buckingham.

Poverty not sole indicator of food deserts

Feb 9, 2014
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Did you ever realize how the stores in your neighborhood influence what you eat?  If you're on a tight budget and don't own a car, your food choices are limited to items you can buy within walking distance. Fresh fruits and vegetables aren't usually available at the corner convenience store, and if they are, they're expensive. When the nearest full service market is miles away, eating healthy is a challenge. 

This week on Take Care, Dr. Kelly Bower discusses a new study from Johns Hopkins that found racial makeup determines the food access in a neighborhood. Bower is the lead researcher for the study and also an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Kelly Bower.

Poor neighborhoods in urban areas are known as food deserts, where access to grocery stores is limited. This week on WRVO’s health and wellness show Take Care, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Kelly Bower of Johns Hopkins University, who recently led a study that found it isn't just poverty that is an indicator of whether or not supermarkets are readily available in a neighborhood.

You can judge food by its packaging

Feb 2, 2014
Press Release Finder / Flickr

We put a lot of faith in the food we buy. Every time we open up a jar of pickles, a bag of potato chips or a can of soda, we trust that that product will be safe and of a high quality. The package that food is in has a great impact on that safety and quality. And you may not realize there is actual science behind food packaging, which is quite intricate and complex.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Joesph Hotchkiss talks about the science of food packaging. Hotchkiss is the director of the School of Packaging and the Center for Packaging Innovation and Sustainability at Michigan State University. He was once a science advisor in the Food and Drug Administration, and holds a Ph.D. in food chemistry.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Joseph Hotchkiss.

Tips for living your best life after age 50

Feb 2, 2014
Dark Dwarf / Flickr

Maybe you've taken your good health for granted. But once you turn 50, all bets are off. What you do during this decade will set the stage for a life of continued wellness or one of gradual but irreversible decline. But it's never too late to do the right thing for your body.

This week on Take Care, Huffington Post and AARP columnist Barbara Hannah Grufferman shares three essential tips for staying healthy after age 50. Grufferman has interviewed experts from around the field, and from her findings, she wrote a book called “The Best of Everything After 50.” She also serves as host of "The Best of Everything" on AARP's YouTube Channel.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Barbara Hannah Grufferman.

Food packaging does more than protect food

Jan 31, 2014

Every day, American consumers rely on the cans, bottles, boxes and plastic that food is sold in to keep them safe. In fact, scientists research how food packaging can help preserve food and extend shelf life. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Joseph Hotchkiss, director of the school of packaging at Michigan State University about the science of food packaging.

Linda Lowen: Every package protects its contents, but what is it providing protection against?

Brisk is better

Jan 26, 2014
Asela Jayarathne / Flickr

The National Walkers' Health Study recently conducted the largest known study about walkers. It was administered to 40,000 different walkers, mostly middle age. Some walkers were slow and some were nearly jogging. Gretchen Reynolds joined us to talk about the findings. Reynolds is a health reporter for the New York Times and author of "The First 20 Minutes: Surprising Science Reveals How We Can Exercise Better, Train Smarter, Live Longer".

Click Read More to hear our interview with Gretchen Reynolds.

When illness causes parent-child role reversal

Jan 26, 2014
MTSOfan / Flickr

At the beginning of life, parents generally take care of children. But later in life, many adult children find that they become the ones who must take care of their parents. Whether that transition happens suddenly or slowly over the years, it can be difficult because the roles parents and children have played for decades are reversed.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Leana Wen, an emergency physician and director of patient-centered care research at George Washington University, discusses some of the things adult children should keep in mind as they become caregivers.

Click Read More to hear our interview with Dr. Wen.

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