Take Care

Sunday evenings at 6:30 pm

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email both Linda, Lorraine and the show producers at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

WRVO allows republishing of Take Care web posts at no charge, with the following provisions:  a) no editing of scripts, graphics or audio is allowed;  b) "WRVO Public Media" shall be credited on the republished post; and c) notification of intent to republish a post is emailed to TakeCare@wrvo.org.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

Office of Emergency and Public Health Preparedness / Flickr

After the recent measles outbreak, citizens, medical professionals, advocacy groups and government entities were all talking about "public health." But public health is an ongoing issue -- one that requires more attention. That's according to Dr. Leana Wen, Baltimore City's health commissioner. This week on "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Wen about the importance of public health.

The dangers of having a sweet tooth

Feb 15, 2015
Judy van der Velden / via Flickr

Sugar is in a lot of the foods you consume every day, but not all sugar is created equal. Whether it’s refined, naturally occurring, or added – sugar should be eaten sparingly, according to this week’s guest, because addiction to sugar is very real and very possible. And it’s not just the addition to sugar that’s a problem, it’s the damage it can do to your body.

This week on “Take Care,” James DiNicolantonio explains what causes sugar addiction and helps us differentiate healthy and harmful sugars. DiNicolantonio is a cardiovascular research scientist at Saint Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Missouri.

There’s fungus among us and a pedicure won’t fix it

Feb 15, 2015
jima / Flickr

Fungus of the nail, while virtually painless, can often stick out like a sore thumb. Embarrassing discoloration isn’t the only downside of fungus -- if left untreated, that fungus can spread and destroy the nail.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Dana Stern discusses how fungal infections are formed and how to treat them. Stern is a dermatologist, nail specialist and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. 

How sugar impacts the brain and body

Feb 13, 2015

For years, nutritionists have been pushing Americans to eat more vegetables and fewer desserts. But emerging research is increasingly showing the damage eating too much sugar can do to our health. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with James DiNicolantonio, a cardiovascular research scientist at St. Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas City and a leading authority on the effects of sugar on the body.

Lorraine Rapp: So what is it about sugar that makes it so harmful?

Dr. Germ's advice on avoiding colds and flu

Feb 8, 2015
Claus Rebler / Flickr

The flu and flu-related complications hospitalize more than 200,000 people each year. But experts say there a lot of ways people can try to avoid catching flu and cold germs and help keep them from spreading.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Philip Tierno discusses how to reduce your likelihood of contracting and spreading the flu. Tierno is a professor in the department of pathology and microbiology at NYU Langone Medical Center and is also the author of “The Secret Life of Germs: What They Are, Why We Need Them and How We Can Protect Ourselves against Them.” Because of his expertise, he’s earned the nickname “Dr. Germ.”

Why are people afraid of flying?

Feb 8, 2015
atomicshark / Flickr

Flying is not easy these days, especially so for those living with a paralyzing fear of the skies. But you don’t have to let your fear of flying ground you, because there is a way to remedy anxiety caused by flying.

This week on “Take Care,” Tom Bunn talks about what causes a fear of flying and how to regulate it. Bunn is a pilot who has flown in the military and for commercial airlines. Bunn is a licensed therapist and is the founder of SOAR, a program that has helped more than 5,000 individuals get over their fear of flying.

StarsApart / Flickr

Cold and flu season is at its peak right now. So what can you do to keep from picking up germs from friends, co-workers and family members? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Philip Tierno, a professor at NYU Medical Center and the author of the book, "The Secret Life of Germs: What They Are, Why We Need Them." Tierno discusses the science behind his recommendations for how to avoid picking up a cold or flu bug.

Fox Valley Institute / Flickr

Post-traumatic stress disorder affects 7.8 million people at some point in their lives. Anyone who has suffered through an accident, war, natural disasters or sexual assault can develop post-traumatic stress.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Francine Shapiro talks about Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, or EMDR, a kind of therapy used to help victims of trauma. Shapiro is the originator and developer of EMDR therapy and is the executive director of the EMDR Institute in Watsonville, California.

adwriter / Flickr

A growing body of medical evidence indicates that childhood trauma may be a major risk factor for poor health and quality of life in later years. But as life continues, instead of burying the past, many elders search for a way to get rid of the burdens associated with hurtful memories. This week, we interview an expert who says it’s not too late to resolve issues and achieve peace in your senior years.

Lisa Kendall joins us on “Take Care” to discuss options for resolving trauma before the end of life. Kendall is a licensed clinical social worker specializing in the areas of aging, elder care, trauma and adult survivors of childhood abuse. She speaks on these topics at a national level.

Helping victims of trauma

Jan 30, 2015

EMDR is a controversial kind of therapy meant to help patients get over different kinds of trauma. It stands for “Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing.” And while some doctors don't believe in it, others, and survivors of accidents, natural disasters and sexual assault, swear by this kind of treatment. And the Defense Department sanctions it to help veterans deal with post-traumatic stress disorder. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Francine Shapirom, who developed this therapy.

ShareHows.com / Flickr

Breast cancer is the deadliest cancer for women in the United States. So what are the risk factors for this kind of cancer? And can anything be done to minimize them?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Ann Partridge discusses how to decrease the risk in the development of cancer. Partridge is an associate professor at Harvard Medical School, the founder and director of the Program for Young women with Breast Cancer and the director of the Adult Survivorship Program at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

jsmjr / Flickr

A tooth has been bothering you for a couple of days now, maybe for the first time – but maybe not. Tooth pain can be just that, a pain, but with new options in the field of dentistry, you could be pain free and chomping at the bit in no time.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Phillip Sheridan explains how dental implants work. Dr. Sheridan is an associate professor of dentistry in the Mayo Clinic’s dental specialties department.

Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer among american women. The role genetics plays in who gets breast cancer has been reported a lot recently. But there are also other risk factors. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with oncologist Dr. Ann Partridge of the Dana Farber Institute about the lifestyle changes women can make to help reduce their risk.

Lorraine Rapp: Let’s talk briefly about who is at most risk for getting breast cancer in the general population -- not genetics, not family history.

Science finds you can teach an old dog new tricks

Jan 18, 2015
Dierk Schaefer / Flickr

It may seem like a truism that older people are set in their ways. But research is showing that the human brain is uniquely designed to allow people to change, even as we age.

This week on “Take Care,” author David DiSalvo discusses what science has discovered about our adaptability and how people can use that knowledge to make changes in their own behavior. DiSalvo is the author of three books about the human brain and cognitive psychology. His most recent is "Brain Changer: How Harnessing Your Brain's Power to Adapt Can Change Your Life."

Workout worries for the 'weekend warrior'

Jan 18, 2015
Global Panorama / Flickr

You’re always so busy during the day that when evening comes you’re too tired to exercise. So you decide to wait for the weekend and work out extra hard to make up for it. But is that a good idea?

This week on “Take Care,” health writer Gretchen Reynolds discusses the dangers of being a “weekend warrior.” Reynolds writes for The New York Times “Well Blog” and is the author of the book “The First 20 Minutes: Surprising Science Reveals How We Can Exercise Better, Train Smarter, Live Longer.”

Research shows flexibility of human brain

Jan 16, 2015

Change is often hard. But new research shows that the human brain is much more flexible than once thought. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with David DiSalvo, the author of the book "Brain Changer: How Harnessing Your Brain's Power to Adapt Can Change Your Life." DiSalvo says this discovery is one of the biggest coming out of neuroscience research in recent years.

cjuneau / Flickr

Upstate New York’s harsh winters and even harsher winds can be dangerous. One of the health risks, if you are caught out in the elements, or without a source of heat for a period of time, is hypothermia.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Chris McStay talks about how hypothermia affects the body and how to prevent it. McStay is chief of clinical operations at the department of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Alberto Pasini / Flickr

With menopause comes hot flashes, night sweats and more uncomfortable side effects. But what if we told you there was something right in your pocket (or purse) that could help you deal with all of these symptoms?

This week on “Take Care,” we speak with Dr. JoAnn Manson about a new app that can help you deal with menopause. Manson is professor of medicine at Harvard Medical school and chief of preventive medicine a Brigham and Women’s hospital.

Bitter cold: the basics of hypothermia

Jan 9, 2015
Corey Templeton / Flickr

In these cold winter months, the risk for hypothermia rises. You don't have to be an outdoor enthusiast or an avid hiker, in fact, don't even have to be outside to develop hypothermia. A few degrees means the difference between a normal core body temperature, and a temperature dangerously close to hypothermia.

This week on "Take Care," we speak with Dr. Chris McStay, chief of clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, about hypothermia and how to avoid it.

Using guided imagery to help patients cope

Jan 4, 2015
llnataliell / Flickr

The mind-body connection is increasingly being explored by doctors, scientists and others. Research shows that guided imagery can help turn around the way your mind works, thus the way your body behaves. 

This week on “Take Care,” Jane Pernotto Ehrman speaks about how guided imagery works. Ehrman is lead behavioral health specialist at the Cleveland Clinic Center for Lifestyle Medicine in the Wellness Institute, and has had personal experience with guided imagery working for her.

Thirteen of Clubs / Flickr

Avoiding stressful moments can be difficult living in today’s society. But new research about the impact of stress on your heart may make you want to try.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Peter Gianaros shares his research and advice on the risks stress has on the heart. Gianaros is an associate professor in the department of psychology at the University of Pittsburgh.

Stress, anxiety and heart health

Jan 2, 2015
Nicolas Raymond / freestock.ca via Flickr

Can stress, anxiety and depression cause heart disease? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with Dr. Peter Gianaros, a psychology professor at the University of Pittsburgh about his research into how the mind-body connection effects heart health.

Lorraine Rapp: What have you learned about how what we think and feel effect cardiovascular health?

Trysil / Flickr

The time to pull out the winter sporting gear has come, but with it comes the possibility of injury

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Navan Duggal discusses the strain winter sports can have on the body and what you can do to decrease the risk of injury. Duggal was chief of the Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Service at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and is currently in private practice at Syracuse Orthopedic Surgeons.

chelsea / Flickr

When Rebecca Soffer lost both of her parents in her early thirties, she realized how isolating grief can be. She envisioned a community of younger adults sharing stories, not judgment, in a productive and honest way.

This week on “Take Care,” Rebecca Soffer shares her story and the website that came out of her experience. She is the co-founder and CEO of the website Modern Loss.

Why snow plus sports so often equals injuries

Dec 19, 2014

Winter sports are certainly popular in northern and central New York. But whether it’s skating, skiing or sledding, falling on the snow or ice is inevitable -- and can lead to injury. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with Syracuse-based orthopedist Dr. Naven Duggal about the risks of winter sports and how to prevent injuries.

Christiana Care / Flickr

A vocal doctor-patient relationship is crucial especially when a patient's needs should be addressed. 

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Atul Grover discusses the importance of increased communication between doctors and patients. Grover is chief public policy officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Gout -- how it starts and how to decrease its risk

Dec 14, 2014
Ivan Lian / Flickr

When an individual has their first encounter with gout, it can develop quite suddenly, over a period of hours.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Robert Shmerling talks about risk factors and how to reduce your likelihood of getting gout.  Shmerling is a Harvard Medical School professor and clinical chief of rheumatology at Beth-Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.

Focusing on the patient

Dec 12, 2014

Doctors used to be seen as authority figures who could not be questioned. But as society becomes more service oriented, patient-centered care has become something that the medical community is increasingly focused on. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with Dr. Atul Grover of the Association of American Medical Colleges about how this emphasis is changing the way doctors are trained.

Health Information Technology: the future of medicine

Dec 7, 2014
Community Eye Health / Flickr

With so much information being stored on the web today, it may come as a surprise that medical records have only recently begun the conversion into a digital format known as HIT, or Health Information Technology.  Like any big change, using electronic medical records poses many potential benefits and risks.

This week on “Take Care,” David Whitlinger discusses the factors involved in the switch from paper-based medical records to electronic medical records.  Whitlinger is executive director of the New York eHealth Collaborative and former director of healthcare device standards and interoperability for the Intel Corporation’s digital health group.

Maintaining a healthy weight through the holidays

Dec 7, 2014
thepeachmartini / Flickr

It happens every year. The holiday season rolls around and suddenly you can’t eat enough. Some people argue that holiday food is the best food of the year, but what can we do to make sure we don’t end up ruining a year’s worth of diet and exercise?

This week on “Take Care,” registered dietician Ashley Koff suggests strategies to eat healthy and not gain too much weight during the holiday time. Koff is a contributing editor to Prevention magazine, the author of two books and on the faculty of the Continuum Center for Health and Healing at the Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City.