Take Care

Sunday evenings at 6:30 pm

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email both Linda, Lorraine and the show producers at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

Keeping an eye on aging and your sight

Jan 19, 2014
Wil Taylor / Flickr

With age comes a variety of health issues. But what can you do if age brings conditions that impact your sight? This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Sheila West, professor and researcher at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins describes age-related eye disorders, and ways to slow and treat them.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview about age related eye disorders.

Play, the kale of behavior

Jan 19, 2014
Thaddeus Stewart / Flickr

That’s right, eat it up. Play has so many benefits that one play researcher describes it as the super food of behavior. Gwen Gordon is a pioneer in the field of transpersonal play. She’s worked with the MIT Media Lab, won an Emmy for children’s programming, and is currently producing the documentary “Seriously! A Movie About Play.”

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Gwen Gordon.

Can playing as an adult be good for you?

Jan 17, 2014
Eugene Kim / Flickr

You may think playtime is just for children, but research is showing that spending time just playing may be good for your health as an adult. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Gwen Gordon, an expert in the scientific benefits of play.

Lorraine Rapp: What can you tell us about the actual health benefits of play?

Clinical trials: How drugs get from R&D to your pharmacy

Jan 12, 2014
e-MagineArt.com / Flickr

It takes years for the medication you find in your neighborhood pharmacy to go through research and development. But it takes something more than that for those drugs to make it to your medicine cabinet – clinical trials and people willing to participate in them.

This week on "Take Care," Dr. Lindsay McNair, chief clinical research officer for WIRB-Copernicus Group, a leading independent institutional review board which provides human research protections and ethical research support in the field of drug development, describes how clinical trials work, who participates in them, and why.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. McNair.

Go nuts the next time you snack

Jan 12, 2014
Leah Landry / WRVO

Want to get your weight down and your health up? Maybe you've made a New Years resolution that says you're sticking to heart healthy foods and a guilt-free diet plan. Turns out the answer is nuts.

A recent study, in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that people who regularly eat nuts are 20 percent less likely to die from heart disease, respiratory disease or cancer. Registered dietitian Rachel Berman joined us to discuss the findings and to take a good look at the heart-healthy nut.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Rachel Berman.

Take Care Year in Review

Jan 5, 2014

“Take Care” welcomes the new year by celebrating the one that just passed. We've condensed our shows from 2013 into a half hour of the best of "Take Care" -- vital advice from the leading experts on how to stay healthy and well in the new year and beyond. 

2013 marked the debut of “Take Care.” The show’s tagline, "a conversation on health and wellness," highlights the basic premise that underscores this show: What could we learn if we sat down with some of the world's top authorities in medicine, science and wellness and asked them for their most essential advice?

Out of the dozens of guests Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen spoke to in 2013, we selected nine experts whose practical advice for improving your health is relatively easy to incorporate. They explain why even the smallest investment in your health can have huge returns.

Click 'Read More' to hear "Take Care Year in Review"

How to 'Take Care' in 2014

Jan 3, 2014

Many people make resolutions to be healthier this time of year -- whether that involves nutrition, exercise, or stress reduction. WRVO's weekly health show "Take Care" offers some suggestions if you're still trying to decide how to improve your wellness. Hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen take a look back at the advice some of the experts they interviewed offered listeners in 2013.

Why is the U.S. facing a physician shortage?

Dec 22, 2013
Mercy Health / Flickr

As current physicians get older, a recent trend shows that there aren’t enough potential physicians to replace them. Some projections say that by the end of the decade, there will be a shortfall of 90,000 doctors, causing what many are calling a doctor shortage. What happens when there aren’t enough around?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Atul Grover discusses the causes of the nation’s doctor shortage. Dr. Grover is chief public policy officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges. Trained as a general internist, Dr. Grover now holds faculty appointments at the George Washington University School of Medicine, and the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Grover.

How female friendships improve health after 50

Dec 22, 2013
Flavia Aste / Flickr

Ask women to name the relationships that make their lives meaningful, and female friendships will likely rank high on the list. But having good friends means a great deal more than fun times and girls’ nights out. As women age, their friendships with other women may offer significant health benefits. Recent studies indicate that women can change one another's brain chemistry for the better.

This week on Take Care, Suzanne Braun Levine discusses what makes female friendships so important, especially for older women. Levine is a writer, editor and nationally recognized authority on women and family issues and media. The first editor of Ms. magazine, she was also the first woman editor of the Columbia Journalism Review. Her e-book, "You Gotta Have Girlfriends: A Post-Fifty Posse is Good For Your Health," is the fourth installment in her series, which examines women in “second adulthood.”

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Suzanne Braun Levine.

Experts say a doctor shortage is on the way

Dec 20, 2013

Many experts believe the United States is facing a doctor shortage in the not-too-distant future. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Atul Grover, the chief public policy officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges about why there may not be enough physicians and what could be done about it.

What's the secret to getting a good night's sleep?

Dec 15, 2013
Samantha Marx / Flickr

How long is too long to take a nap? How can I tell if I have sleep apnea or not? What exactly is the secret to getting a good night’s sleep? If you’ve found yourself asking any of these questions before, you’re not alone. Good sleep is something we all want and need, but something we may not know how to achieve.

This week on Take Care, in part two of our interview, Dr. Orfeu Buxton answers common questions about sleep. Buxton is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, and neuroscientist in the Division of Sleep Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Orfeu Buxton.

Ebb and Flow Photography / Flickr

In the past, hip replacement surgeries were generally reserved for elderly people. Long recovery times and expensive materials sometimes deterred people from getting the procedure. But, as minimally invasive techniques and materials have improved in recent years, the population of people getting hip replacements has changed as a result.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Seth Greenky discusses the current state of hip replacement surgeries. An associate professor in orthopedics at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, NY, Dr. Greenky also co-directs the Joint Replacement Program at St. Joseph’s Hospital, also in Syracuse.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Greenky.

Tim Samoff / Flickr

More than 300,000 hip replacements are performed each year, and advancements in the surgery are giving hope to baby boomers who want to continue their active lives. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Seth Greenky, a surgeon and co-director of the Joint Replacement Program at St. Joseph's Hospital about how hip replacements work, whether you're in your 20s or your 90s.

Michael Mandiberg / Flickr

Depending on how much we get, sleep can either be our best friend or our worst enemy. A good night’s sleep can make us feel refreshed and rejuvenated, while a bad night’s sleep can leave us feeling moody and groggy. So exactly how much rest is needed to call it a good night’s sleep?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Orfeu Buxton discusses sleep deprivation. Buxton is assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, associate neuroscientist in the Division of Sleep Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and associate professor at Pennsylvania State University. He participated in a recent Q&A on sleep featured in the New York Times.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Buxton.

Does a healthy gut mean a healthy body?

Dec 8, 2013
mellowynk / Flickr

Emerging research reveals that good digestion and a healthy digestive tract are dependent on beneficial bacteria, also known as probiotics. But you don't have to buy special yogurt to add probiotics to your diet. Fermented foods like sauerkraut and kimchi also aid in digestion and improve your immune system. Once you learn the basics of fermenting, it can be a fun and inexpensive way to preserve food at home and add essential nutrients.

This week on Take Care, Amy Jeanroy explains the benefits of eating fermented foods. Jeanroy is a newspaper editor, food writer and co-author of the book, "Fermenting for Dummies," published earlier this year. She's been making and eating fermented foods for 20 years and shares her love of preparing food at home on her website, TheFarmingWife.com.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Jeanroy.

How much sleep is enough?

Dec 6, 2013
Tony Alter / Flickr

Getting a good night's sleep is easier for some people than others. But research has shown it's essential for everyone. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Orfeu Buxton, a neuroscientist and sleep researcher from Harvard, about the health issues a lack of sleep can cause.

Lorraine Rapp: Can you tell us what role does sleep play in our overall health?

Don't be afraid, social anxiety is beatable

Nov 24, 2013
Cavale Doom / Flickr

We're at that time of year when holiday parties and social activities crowd our social calendar. You may dread the office party and worry about what to wear, but that's a common anxiety many of us face.  But according to the National Institutes of Health, millions of Americans suffer from something much worse -- extreme fear of being scrutinized and judged by others. When the fear is so debilitating it disrupts daily life, it’s social anxiety disorder, a chronic mental health condition also known as social phobia.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio, discusses social anxiety and how to overcome the disorder. Zasio is a nationally-known clinical psychologist who specializes in this field. She's familiar to many from her appearances on the A&E television series “Hoarders.” Zasio is also the author of "The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robin Zasio.

Cross-train your brain to fight cognitive decline

Nov 24, 2013
Liz Henry / Flickr

Moments of forgetfulness happen to everyone. Whether it’s losing your car keys or not remembering why you opened the refrigerator, it can be frustrating to blank out when trying to remember something. When those moments happen, it’s easy to attribute it to an aging mind. But forgetfulness doesn't have to be a symptom of encroaching old age. In fact, advances in science are enabling us to reclaim lost ground and even prevent loss of memory and function.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Sherry Willis, discusses cognitive function and how older adults can keep their minds sharp. Willis is an adjunct research professor in the department of psychology at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Sherry Willis.

Millions of Americans suffer from social anxiety disorder, an extreme fear of being judged by others in social situations. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with doctor Robin Zasio, a nationally known clinical psychologist and author about what social anxiety disorder is and how to treat it.

Lorraine Rapp: would you explain the difference between just being shy and actual social anxiety?

With strokes, "time saved is brain saved"

Nov 17, 2013
gwire / Flickr

While time is often a major factor in determining how much damage a medical ailment can cause, it is especially true with strokes. Under the right conditions, the reversibility of stroke symptoms can decrease by the minute. But why is the saying “time saved is brain saved” so important when it comes to strokes?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Larry Goldstein, discusses how to recognize a stroke, and why time is of the essence when it comes to treating them. Dr. Goldstein is a professor of neurology at Duke University and director of the Duke Comprehensive Stroke Center in North Carolina.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Goldstein.

Why so SAD?

Nov 17, 2013
Marcel / Flickr

Winter in central and northern New York isn’t always as picturesque as some may wish it to be. Daylight is usually gone before the work day is over, flurries have the potential to make any drive difficult, and gray skies often seem like they’re never going away. It’s normal to feel off when the days get shorter, but what happens when these feelings manifest into something much more serious on a yearly basis?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Kelly Rohan discusses the causes and treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Rohan is an expert in SAD and acting director of clinical training in the Department of Psychology at the University of Vermont.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Rohan.

Time and awareness is key to treating a stroke

Nov 15, 2013

Knowing how to recognize the symptoms of stroke can mean the difference between life and death. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, spoke with Dr. Larry Goldstein, professor of neurology and director of Duke University's Stroke Center about what you should do if you suspect a loved one has had a stroke.

Lorraine Rapp: Describe what takes place in the body when a person is having a stroke?

Much is still unknown about Parkinson's disease

Nov 10, 2013
Mikael Häggström

While Michael J. Fox may best be known for his acting, many know him as one of the leading figures in taking away the stigma against Parkinson’s disease. Fox, along with former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, boxer Muhammad Ali and singer Linda Ronstadt have all been open and frank about their diagnosis of the disease. But as more and more of the public are aware of the disease though, there is still much that is unknown about Parkinson’s disease.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Kelvin Chou discusses the uncertainties involved with Parkinson’s disease, as well as cutting edge ways to treat it. Dr. Chou is associate professor of neurology and neurosurgery at the University of Michigan Medical School, and is one of the country’s leading authorities on Parkinson’s disease. He has recently published a book for patients and families called Deep Brain Stimulation: A New Life for People with Parkinson’s, Dystonia and Essential Tremor.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Chou.

What should men do when they have 'Low T?'

Nov 10, 2013
DEA.gov

You’ve seen the advertisements. A middle-aged man appears to be depressed and withdrawn from his family, and his interest in sexual activity is at an all-time low. What’s wrong with him? He’s been suffering from low testosterone levels, and all of his problems can be solved with a simple supplement. The frequency of ads for testosterone supplements have increased recently, and with it, questions about how legitimate testosterone replacement therapy is.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Martin Miner discusses the facts and myths of the condition known as “low T,” or reduced levels of testosterone in men. Dr. Miner is the co-director of the Men’s Health Center and chief of Family Practice and Community Medicine at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island. He’s also clinical associate professor of family medicine and urology at Brown University Medical School.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Miner.

Parkinson's disease: diagnosis and treatment

Nov 8, 2013
Liz West / Flickr

Parkinson's disease used to be something people didn't like to talk about. But celebrities like Michael J. Fox and Linda Ronstadt, who have been open about having the degenerative nervous disorder, have taken away some of the stigma. There is still much about Parkinson's that even the experts don't understand. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr.

Hepatitis C -- the "silent epidemic"

Nov 3, 2013
Microbe World / Flickr

The “baby boomer” generation – Americans born between 1945 and 1965, has had a big impact on American society and culture. Now a disease is having a big effect on them. Baby boomers are five times more likely to have contracted Hepatitis C than the rest of the population. With symptoms that may not appear for decades, most may not even know they have Hepatitis C until it is too late.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Bryce D. Smith explains why all baby boomers should be tested for Hepatitis C. Dr. Smith is a lead health scientist in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Viral Hepatitis, and is the primary author of recent Hepatitis C testing recommendations that are aimed at members of the baby boomer generation.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Smith.

How to de-stress and improve your health

Nov 3, 2013
bottled_void / Flickr

Stress is a part of everyday life, and for some people, the workplace can be a significant cause. Sometimes, when work isn’t left at work, stress from the job can bleed into your personal life and severely affect your physical health. But, dealing with work stress can be easier than people may think.

This week on Take Care, Jane Pernotto Ehrman discusses causes of stress in the workplace and ways to deal with it. Ehrman is the lead behavioral specialist at the Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Lifestyle Medicine, in the Wellness Institute, where she develops and implements the behavioral and stress management sections of lifestyle wellness programs.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Jane Pernotto Ehrman.

Health providers in New York state are now required to offer a Hepatitis C test to all baby boomers. That's because about three-quarters of people who have the virus don't know they have it -- and most are in the baby boomer generation. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care” recently spoke with Dr. Bryce Smith of the Centers for Disease Control about this silent epidemic.

Lorraine Rapp: So I know there are different forms of the virus Hepatitis. This is Hepatitis C —what exactly is it and why is it so dangerous?

More salt, more problems, says expert

Oct 27, 2013
Judy van der Velden / Flickr

If your mouth begins to water when you think about pretzels, peanuts and French fries, then you probably like salty foods. If this is true, then you are one of the many who love salt. But while some people understand that too much salt intake isn’t healthy, most don’t realize that cutting back on salt means more than just avoiding the salt shaker during meal time.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Norman Kaplan discusses salt’s effect on the body, and why people should be much more aware of how much salt they are actually taking in. Dr. Kaplan is a professor of internal medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, where he’s been on the faculty for over four decades. His book, Kaplan’s Clinical Hypertension, is currently in its 10th edition.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Kaplan.

Felix E. Guerrero / Flickr

1998 brought about many things: the invention of Google, the Monica Lewinsky scandal, the Winter Olympic Games in Japan and the film Armageddon. While these events took the world by storm, one little blue pill also made its way on to the scene, and has changed how Americans view sex in the 15 years since.

This week on Take Care, sociologist Meika Loe discusses the history and the effects of the drug Viagra. Loe is an associate professor of sociology and women’s studies at Colgate University in Hamilton, N.Y., and the author of the book The Rise of Viagra: How the Little Blue Pill Changed Sex in America.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Meika Loe.

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