Alzheimer's

Navigating Alzheimer's disease

Jul 13, 2014
MTSOfan / Flickr

Alzheimer’s disease may not be one of the fastest-acting illnesses, but its psychological and emotional effects on patients and their families can be devastating.  Although a cure for the disease has yet to be found, there are many lifestyle changes that can be taken to help prevent and slow the development of Alzheimer’s.

This week on “Take Care,” Drs. Richard Isaacson and Dale Atkins discuss some of the issues associated with Alzheimer’s and how to fight the disease once you or someone you know has been diagnosed.  Dr. Isaacson is the director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at New York Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center. He is also the author of "Alzheimer’s Treatment Alzheimer’s Prevention: A Patient & Family Guide" and "The Alzheimer’s Diet: A Step-by-Step Nutritional Approach for Memory Loss Prevention and Treatment."  Dr. Atkins is a licensed psychologist who works with Alzheimer’s patients and their families.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with both Dr. Isaacson and Dr. Atkins.

Preventing and coping with Alzheimer's disease

Jul 11, 2014

As the baby boomer generation continues to age, the number of people diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease is predicted to triple -- and many families are already dealing with the effects of this debilitating disease. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Richard Isaacson, director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at the New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and Dr. Dale Atkins, a psychologist, author and Alzheimer's expert, about preventing and coping with Alzheimer's disease.

The Grain Brain diet: adopting a demanding nutrition plan

Jun 29, 2014
Lori Branham / Flickr

It’s breakfast time, and you’re about to dig into a plate of—salmon?

This week on “Take Care,” we present the second installment of our interview with Dr. David Perlmutter, who explains how to transition into his low-carb diet.  Perlmutter is a board-certified neurologist and Fellow of the American College of Nutrition.  He is also the author of Grain Brain: The surprising truth about wheat, carbs, and sugar—your brain’s silent killers.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Perlmutter.

Charles Knowles / Flickr

You may be careful to eat whole grain breads and cereals instead of white bread, but did you know that some experts say even those foods could be hurting your health?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Perlmutter discusses the negative health effects of carbohydrates and how to reduce those effects.  Perlmutter is a board-certified neurologist and Fellow of the American College of Nutrition.  He is also the author of Grain Brain: The surprising truth about wheat, carbs, and sugar—your brain’s silent killers.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. David Perlmutter.

Why carbohydrates may be bad for brain health

Jun 20, 2014
surlygirl / Flickr

In recent years, many people have adopted a low-carbohydrate diet to help with weight loss or because they want to eat less gluten. But some new research shows there may be a connection between carbs and cognitive function. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. David Perlmutter, a board-certified neurologist and author of "Grain Brain: The surprising truth about wheat, carbs, and sugar -- your brain’s silent killers."  Dr. Perlmutter talks about his book and the potential health benefits of a low-carbohydrate diet.

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have used high resolution imaging to show that Alzheimer’s begins in a specific part of the brain, known as a gateway to the hippocampus.

Dr. Scott Small, co-author of the study, says this particular area plays a vital role in consolidating long term memories. The discovery could help with early diagnosis of the disease, and that, he says, could lead to more effective intervention.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

Upstate Medical University's new Neuroscience Research Building is on the cusp of bringing brain researchers together at last. The $72 million building is an expansion at Upstate's Institute for Human Performance.

VIPs toured the block-long, five-story building this week. At this point it's a shell, full of empty labs and dark rooms. It's the $50 million worth of high tech equipment coming later this year that'll make a difference in brain research, according to Upstate's Vice President for Research Rosemary Rochford.

License Attribution Some rights reserved by roland / Creative Commons License

A Binghamton researcher is launching a study that he hopes will help with early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. David Shaffer is looking for Alzheimer’s patients so he can record their voices. Shaffer believes if he can get enough samples and enough funding, he could pinpoint how a deteriorating brain reveals itself in speech patterns, because so much of the brain is involved in speaking.

Copper is an important aspect of proper nutrition, and vital for us to maintain a healthy body. But a group of upstate New York researchers have concluded too much copper in our diet could be a contributing factor in the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

Tap water coming through copper pipes, fruits, vegetables, red meat and nuts; these are all sources of copper that we consume on a daily basis.

Will a cup a day keep the doctor away?

Aug 2, 2013
Doug88888 / Flickr

If you can't get through your morning without a couple cups of coffee, there's good news. Recent health studies show that coffee may be good for your brain and may help prevent certain diseases. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," recently spoke with health journalist Gretchen Reynolds about what researchers are learning about the health benefits of coffee.

Lorraine Rapp: Tell us about some of the recent studies linking coffee consumption with the reduction in developing some certain diseases.

More and more people across the country are dying from Alzheimer's disease -- and central New York is not immune to the trend.

Eileen Krupka's father has suffered from Alzheimer's Disease for the last six years.  He's like many other's with the progressive neurological disease of the brain he wanders, in fact 60-percent of Alzheimers or dementia patients wander and its a worry for the Krupka family, who live in Baldwinsville.

We have a lot of water around us. and he seems to be fascinated by the water and that's a huge concern