baby boomers

Retiring old perceptions about aging

Nov 6, 2015
MTSOfan / Flickr

As the influential baby boomer generation gets older, they are reinventing what it means to be a senior citizen. But much of American society views being elderly negatively. This Sunday, on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Bill Thomas, a physician, author and expert on eldercare about changing this perception.

This week on the Campbell Conversations, the discussion returns to millennials—how are their lives and views different from the generations that have preceded them, especially the Baby Boomers?  Are these differences permanent, or will millennials begin to act and think like previous generations as they age?  Host Grant Reeher talks with Paul Taylor, author of The Next America:  Boomers, Millennials, and the Looming Generational Show

The group F.O.C.U.S. Greater Syracuse is trying to keep baby boomers from leaving the area as they retire. The community group has completed a study about just how age-friendly central New York is.

Baby boomers, born between 1946 and 1964, make up about a third of Onondaga County’s population. F.O.C.U.S. wanted to find out what would make it easier for them to stay in central New York.  

Nine out of ten older people in Tompkins County want to stay close by for retirement, but a survey finds a majority want to move to more urban areas, which will put a strain on housing.

Ithaca is a city that already has a tight housing market. The Tompkins County Office for the Aging found it will likely get tighter. The agency conducted a survey of people who recently retired or are about to.