breast cancer

People who are obese are likely to have fast heart rates and after weight loss surgery, when concentrations of the hormone leptin drop, so does a person’s heart rate, says Rushikesh Shah, MD (who is completing his training in internal medicine at Upstate University Hospital). More on this "physiological compensatory change" and ways to help avoid unnecessary diagnostic tests and medical interventions.

Also this week: a special dance class for people with Parkinson's disease to improves balance, gait and strength and a program for those with a high risk for breast cancer.

Advances in the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer begins in laboratories. This week, we'll get an inside look at four different labs currently searching for answers.

First, a lab that explores how to determine which drugs will work best in each patient. Then, scientists Christopher Turner and Nicholas Deakin detail their search for ways to halt the spread of cancer. Next, how to better protect bone from radiation therapy during cancer treatments. And lastly, the best way to inhibit estrogen, which can trigger breast cancer in women after menopause.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

There is a nationwide racial disparity when it comes to breast cancer. The mortality rate is 41 percent higher for African-American women than Caucasian women. But a special program at Pioneer Homes in Syracuse hopes to put a dent in that number.

The idea is to get the 149 women over the age of 40 in this public housing development to get a mammogram, which can detect cancer in its early stages and can lead to better survival rates.

Aidan Jones / Flickr

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, but chances are you might not know that. Lung cancer just doesn’t get some of the same attention as other types of cancer, and that ultimately leads to more deaths.

Will a cup a day keep the doctor away?

Aug 2, 2013
Doug88888 / Flickr

If you can't get through your morning without a couple cups of coffee, there's good news. Recent health studies show that coffee may be good for your brain and may help prevent certain diseases. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," recently spoke with health journalist Gretchen Reynolds about what researchers are learning about the health benefits of coffee.

Lorraine Rapp: Tell us about some of the recent studies linking coffee consumption with the reduction in developing some certain diseases.

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute / dana-farber.org

Last month, when actress Angelina Jolie announced that she decided to undergo surgery to have her breasts removed to reduce her chances of developing breast cancer, public attention has been focused on prophylactic mastectomies, a procedure which has increased in popularity in recent years.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview about prophylactic mastectomies.

When actress Angelina Jolie decided to have her breasts surgically removed to prevent her from getting breast cancer, it brought unprecedented attention to the growing trend of prophylactic mastectomies. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO’s health and wellness show, “Take Care,” spoke with Dr. Ann Partridge, a medical oncologist and Harvard professor, about why more women are electing to have this surgery.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

Letters have started going out from radiologists to women, after normal mammograms, to alert them to a condition that might make it harder for doctors to find breast cancer.  A state initiative called the "Breast Density Inform" bill ultimately may force women to have a deeper discussion with their doctors about their risk factors for breast cancer.