climate change

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Environmentalists are bringing a giant yellow oil barrel across New York State to bring attention to Attorney General Eric Schneiderman’s fight to extract internal research from Exxon Mobile about climate change.

Bret Jaspers / WSKG News

Jobs were a major topic at a candidate forum at SUNY Broome for the 22nd Congressional District Thursday. But climate change came up as well, and there were definite differences in how the three candidates talked about it. 

Democrat Kim Myers advocated for government incentives to develop new technologies.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

New York Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) said his position on climate change is "evolving." The Republican representative recently signed onto a resolution that acknowledges a human role in causing climate change related to erratic and damaging weather patterns. That's a reversal from his 2014 campaign when he said it was unclear if human activities had any influence.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

While most central and northern New York crops are being planted right now, there’s one that’s being harvested. SUNY ESF researchers are harvesting willow, as part of a project that continues to find the best way to use the woody plant as an alternative energy source.

When most people hear the word willow, an image of a weeping willow tree comes to mind. But that’s not what SUNY ESF researchers are working on in the Willow Project, a program that’s developing a biomass energy source.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Central New York is preparing to have more electric vehicles on the roads in the near future.

Chevrolet is promising that it will deliver an affordable electric vehicle with a 200-mile range to showrooms by the end of this year. Other electric vehicle producers are expected to follow suit. So with the potential of more of these vehicles hitting the highway, Central New York’s Regional Planning and Development Board is getting ready.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Planting season is getting underway in central New York. And for farmers it means another year when the changing climate can make or break a growing season. But farmers aren’t sitting still when it comes to dealing with the more severe weather that comes along with a warming climate.

U.S. Department of Agricuture / Flickr, Creative Commons

Lewis County is now looking to solar to help save on energy costs. County officials expect the new solar project to generate enough power to supply half the energy needed to run the municipal hospital and county offices.

Lewis County plans to fill a nine- acre parcel of land behind the Public Safety Building in Lowville with enough solar panels to produce two-megawatts of energy. Chairman Mike Tabolt, head of the Lewis County Board of Legislators, is negotiating with Greenskies Renewable Energy to develop the solar array.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

As the fourth anniversary of the devastating storms Irene and Lee approaches, the Cuomo administration says it’s more ready than ever for hurricanes, floods, and other adverse weather events .

Since Gov. Andrew Cuomo took office in 2011, there’s been a succession of severe storms, including hurricanes Irene and Lee that brought massive flooding to upstate and Superstorm Sandy in 2012 that flooded beach front communities on Long Island and submerged portions of the New York City subway system in corrosive salt water.

EPA says clean power plan will protect public health

Aug 12, 2015
Kate O'Connell / WXXI File Photo

New carbon standards in the Clean Power Plan announced earlier this month by the Obama administration are also intended to improve your health. The goal of the new rules and regulations is to reduce the 7,500 deaths per year linked to particle pollution from power plants.

The Environmental Protection Agency calls climate change a threat to human health.Judith Enck, EPA administrator for the region that includes New York state, says the new standards will make the air easier to breathe for people with repertory illnesses, like the 25 million Americans who live with asthma.

Kate O'Connell / WXXI News

President Barack Obama’s plan for national standards to curb power plant emissions is based, in part, on a type of cap-and-trade program already existence in New York.  

Conor Bambrick, with the group Environmental Advocates, says he thinks the president's plan , billed by the White House as the “first-ever national standards” to curb carbon pollution from power plants has some of its roots in New York.

James Willamor / Flickr

This Sunday, June 7, on Public Radio Presents, join us for a story from Ithaca.

The climate is going haywire, and politicians are bickering over what to do about it, or whether to do anything at all. But that’s only part of the story. Around the country, communities are taking matters into their own hands, publicly pledging to shrink their carbon footprints, then setting out to make good on their promises. Leading, they hope, from below.

The Adaptors: An Earth Day special from BURN

Apr 13, 2015

Climate change is calling. "The Adaptors" are responding... Join us for this Earth Day special from "BURN: An energy journal" this week on Public Radio Presents.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

The New  York state attorney general says the Buffalo lake effect snowstorms are more evidence that climate change is happening, and that New York and the nation need to work harder to combat the causes of global warming.

State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says this week in western New York is another example of weather patterns that are changing, and won’t go back to normal by themselves.

http://peoplesclimate.org/march/

Central New York will be represented in this weekend's climate change march in New York City.

Several buses of local activists, college students and people concerned about climate change are heading to New York for what organizers are calling the largest climate march in history.

DVIDSHUB / Flickr

A new White House climate report paints a dire picture for New York if something drastic isn't done to address climate change, and the Obama administration is preparing to act without Congress.

The Third National Climate Assessment predicts dramatic changes in coastal states like New York. But the state’s junior Democratic senator, Kirsten Gillibrand, says upstate residents and businesses are at risk too.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

Last week's federal report on climate change puts the spotlight on how increasing global temperatures will affect the world. One Syracuse University professor is trying to localize that by creating a climate garden on campus that will show the effects of climbing temperatures on trees in central New York.

Jason Briner

A new institute designed to tackle complex environmental issues across the globe has been launched in upstate New York. This month, the University at Buffalo announced the launch of the RENEW (Research and Education in Energy, Environment, and Water) program.

Alexander Cartwright, vice president of research and economic development at the university, says an emphasis has been placed on assembling an interdisciplinary and unbiased team to tackle controversial issues.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

Syracuse environmental groups gathered this week to oppose the building of the Keystone XL pipeline following the release of a report on its potential effects.

Keystone XL is a pipeline that would transport crude oil extracted from tar sands in Alberta, Canada to refineries in the U.S.

Environmental groups have opposed the 1,179 mile pipeline since it was proposed to the White House five years ago. The report, which downplayed the pipeline's environmental effects,  has led environmentalists to ramp up protests, including in Syracuse.

The impact and severity of weather events like the tornado that hit Oklahoma City are increasing due to a changing global climate, according to research from the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC).

Tony Ficsher Photography / Flickr

If you’ve ever been in a big city during the summer, you may have felt the "urban heat island" effect. It's caused when heat gets re-radiated by pavement and buildings.

Credit Nicholas_T / via Flickr

The groundhog predicted an early spring this year -- and he isn't the only one.  Scientists now say that thanks to climate climate change, spring may arrive up to 17 days earlier in U.S. forests during the next century and that, could have an unexpected silver lining.

2012 heat causes temperature records to fall

Jan 4, 2013
jovelstefan / via Flickr

As far as weather measurements go, Syracuse crushed its old record for the warmest year ever recorded. Central New Yorkers dealt with the warmest temperatures in more than 80 years during 2012.

DVIDSHUB / Flickr

A report published Thursday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) finds that sea level increases over the next century will have significant impacts on coastal communities.

runJMrun / via Flickr

When environmentalist Bill McKibben visited Syracuse in October as part of the University Lectures series, he urged students to get their schools to make more sustainable investments. His words encouraged Syracuse University and SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry students to start the Fossil Fuel Divestment Campaign.

A new poll finds that, in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, more than two thirds of New Yorkers say they now believe in climate change.

Greg Thompson, USFWS / Flickr

The death and devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy and the Nor’easter that followed it, has brought the issue of climate change to the forefront. According to a new study published in the journal Science, we can expect global warming to be on the high side of current projections.

topgold / Flickr

As the 2012 Summer Olympics get underway this weekend, the world's attention will be focused on London.

But a team of scientists has recently been keeping a very close eye on the city that hosted the games four years ago: Beijing. 

They've discovered that China's efforts to cut back on traffic and clean up its air during the 2008 Olympics could have big implications for curbing climate change.

A recent study published in the journal of Geophysical Research Letters shows that Beijing's traffic restrictions during the games led to a significant reduction in emissions of a powerful greenhouse gas: carbon dioxide (CO2).