cold weather

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

One Central New York non-profit organization is concerned about how horses are faring during this cold snap.

Rescue horses munch on carrots in the huge barn that’s part of The Haven at Skanda, an organization in Cazanovia that cares for rescue horses and farm animals. Executive Director Ellen Beckerman says horses will need extra protection this winter.

How to survive the winter without getting injured

Feb 20, 2016
Steve Webel / Flickr

No matter if the winter is mild or strong, dry and icy, or wet and snowy, cold weather often tends to bring injuries with it.   

Although cold-weather-related injuries may seem inevitable, there are tips and tricks to staying out of the hospital this winter. Dr. Christopher McStay, the chief of operations in the department of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and the former chief of service for the Bellevue Hospital Emergency Department in New York City, speaks with us this week on “Take Care” on how to do this.

Lorianne DiSabato / via Flickr

As this seemingly never-ending winter of record cold temperatures and stubborn snowstorms drags on in central New York, it seems hard to believe that a new season is around the corner. But, spring is lurking beneath the snow pack.

Sarah Harris / NCPR

This year's deep, prolonged freeze has sent frost as much as six feet underground -- deeper than usual. The result is a lot of frozen pipes. Towns, villages and cities across the region report problems with frozen water systems. The deep freeze has also been hard on farmers.

Kevin teRiele is a dairy farmer in Canton who is tired of winter in part, because it makes his work harder. "The biggest issue for most of us is frozen manure," he said.

Corey Templeton / via Flickr

This part probably isn’t news: It’s been really, really cold all month.

There are a few days left in February, but looking at the forecast  -- where temperatures aren’t supposed get any higher than the mid-teens, it’s safe to make some assumptions.

Brian Hoffman / via Flickr

Watertown was the coldest place in the lower 48 states yesterday, reaching -36 degrees on President’s Day morning. 

But around lunch time it had warmed up to a balmy -3 degrees.  It’s the kind of temperature that car engines hate. Still, people were driving around in their cars. But a few brave souls were out on foot.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

When the temperatures drop below zero in the winter, we layer on extra jackets and hunker down inside. The residents at Syracuse's zoo have different ways of dealing with the bitter cold elements.

A pool of bubbling water is probably the last place a human would look for warmth on a frigid January day. But it’s a reprieve from the wind chill for the small Humboldt Penguins at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse.

cjuneau / Flickr

Upstate New York’s harsh winters and even harsher winds can be dangerous. One of the health risks, if you are caught out in the elements, or without a source of heat for a period of time, is hypothermia.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Chris McStay talks about how hypothermia affects the body and how to prevent it. McStay is chief of clinical operations at the department of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Bitter cold: the basics of hypothermia

Jan 9, 2015
Corey Templeton / Flickr

In these cold winter months, the risk for hypothermia rises. You don't have to be an outdoor enthusiast or an avid hiker, in fact, don't even have to be outside to develop hypothermia. A few degrees means the difference between a normal core body temperature, and a temperature dangerously close to hypothermia.

This week on "Take Care," we speak with Dr. Chris McStay, chief of clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, about hypothermia and how to avoid it.