college tuition

State University of New York

SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher is leaving her post next month. In an exit interview with Capitol Correspondent Karen DeWitt, Zimpher spoke about the details and potential drawbacks of the new Excelsior Scholarship program, which will offer free tuition to state colleges to some middle class students.

You can listen to the complete interview with Nancy Zimpher here.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

A residency requirement for college students seeking free tuition at New York’s public colleges is drawing criticism. Gov. Andrew Cuomo defended the late addition to the plan, approved as part of the state budget earlier this month.

Cuomo proudly touted the free tuition program for some middle-class students passed in the week-late state budget, appearing with former first lady and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at LaGuardia Community College in Queens on April 12.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Central New York legislators are split on the recent state budget process. While some see significant gains, others see missed opportunities and purely political motivations.

State Sen. David Valesky with the Independent Democratic Conference said there is a lot to be pleased about in the state's new spending plan.

“By and large I think this was a tremendously successful state budget,” Valesky said.

The budget includes infrastructure investments, college affordability and raising the age of criminal responsibility to 18 years old.

Onondaga Community College

Onondaga Community College expects a bump in enrollment following the state legislature’s approval of free tuition at SUNY and CUNY schools. It was part of the state budget plan approved on Sunday.

formulanone / Flickr

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Here's a look at key items in New York's new $153 billion state budget, approved Sunday night, after the New York Senate approved the spending plan (the Assembly voted on Saturday):

-JvL- / Flickr

The state budget is now three days late and negotiations remain at an impasse. Now, Gov. Andrew Cuomo is asking legislative leaders to extend last year's budget through the end of May while Democrats and Republicans continue working to settle their differences.

New York State Senate

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and state lawmakers missed the midnight budget deadline after they failed to solidify deals on state spending and taxation, as well as some unrelated items like permitting ride hailing services outside of New York City.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is warning that the state might not be able to add more money for schools this year because of uncertainties in Washington over federal funding.

Just days before the state budget is due, Cuomo is urging the state legislature to pull back on additional spending for school districts beyond the $1 billion increase he’s already proposed, saying there’s too much uncertainty over federal funding right now.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

The next two weeks at the New York State Capitol are going to be very busy as lawmakers face the deadline for a new budget. Several issues remain unresolved.

Matt Ryan / New York Now

The state legislature’s one-house budgets make some changes to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s $163 million proposal to offer free tuition at public colleges in New York to some middle-class students.

Cuomo’s plan would have the state pay the tuition at public colleges and universities for students who have a combined family income of up to $125,000 a year when the plan is fully phased in in two years.

Payne Horning / WRVO News File Photo

At the annual Mohawk Valley legislative forum in Utica, state and local leaders said the region's economy is poised to expand thanks to several major projects, but  the endangered status of the nano technology center in Marcy loomed throughout the discussion.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Some state lawmakers are rejecting Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s proposal to extend a tax on millionaires. Cuomo spent Tuesday rolling out his spending plan to individual groups of lawmakers in private briefings, then at night, released details to the public.

Office of Assemblyman Gary Finch

Gov. Andrew Cuomo's proposal to offer free college tuition at New York's SUNY and CUNY schools for families that make less than $125,000 has garnered a lot of attention, but not everyone is receptive to the idea.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-NY) wants free college tuition for students in families making less than $125,000 a year. At an estimated cost of $163 million a year, the program would triple state funding for higher education. But the plan may not reach as many students as the governor claims.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Top State University of New York officials say they want a tuition freeze at the state’s colleges and universities, and are asking Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the state legislature to adequately fund SUNY in the budget  so that they don’t have to raise rates for students . The request comes as lawmakers are scrambling to meet a March 31 budget deadline.

SUNY Board Chair Carl McCall says the university board and it’s chancellor don’t want to raise tuition, and they want Cuomo and the legislature to help them avoid it.

Kent Kanouse / Flickr

The federal government’s new College Scorecard is out, and it’s stirring debate on some campuses. It's a slick website that makes finding data on higher education institutions easy, but one of the metrics has some schools worried.

David Chanatry / New York Reporting Project at Utica College

While the cost of a higher education has continued to rise across the United States, one small private college in central NY is attempting to buck that trend.

The affordability of college education has come under increased scrutiny from lawmakers and parents alike. Utica College President Todd Hutton announced plans yesterday to help change that.

“It gives me great honor to share with you that beginning in the fall of 2016, Utica College will reset its published price of tuition and fees from $35,514 to under $20,000," Hutton said.

Community colleges say free tuition won't cut it

Jan 20, 2015
Solvejg Wastvedt / WSKG

Earlier this month, President Barack Obama said he wants to give all students, regardless of income, two free years of community college.

“Right here, right now, I’m going to announce one of my most important State of the Union proposals,” he said in a speech at Pellissippi State Community College on January 9. “And that’s helping every American afford a higher education.”

The plan caused a stir, even though it was a little short on the details. More information is expected in Obama’s State of the Union address.

Onondaga Community College

Officials at Onondaga Community College like President Barack Obama’s proposal to allow students to attend two years of community college for free.  

Amy Kremenek, vice president of human resources and external relations at OCC, points to the statistics of who attends the two-year college in Syracuse to show how a program like this would be valuable.

m00by / Flickr

Later this week an Assembly committee will hold a hearing on improving access to financial aid for college students. One of the issues will be better access for part-time community college students, who are the fastest growing group.

Stephen Sartori / Say Yes to Education

Say Yes to Education is slightly short of its goal to being independently financially sustainable six years after its start.

Say Yes is a national nonprofit that opened a chapter in the Syracuse school district in 2008. It offers a different strategy to improve urban education with a promise of free college tuition to graduating high school seniors.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

LeMoyne College is making history with it’s new president.  Linda LeMura will soon become the first lay female president at a Jesuit institution anywhere in the world.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

President Obama brought his message of affordable education for the middle class to Syracuse yesterday. It was an intimate atmosphere inside the gym at Henninger High School, with the crowd interacting with the president as he laid the groundwork for his plan.

"There aren't a lot of things that are more important than making sure people get a good education," Obama said. "That is key to upward mobility. That is key to a growing economy.  That is key to a strong middle class."

The crowd then started calling out and shouting to him.

"Love you back."

The cost of going to college is an issue of growing concern among students, their parents and public officials. Now the State University of New York is introducing a tool to help applicants figure out exactly how much it will cost them to attend.

Third Way / Flickr

Members of the 113th Congress will be sworn in January 3 -- and part of the new Congress will be a familiar face returning to Washington to represent the Syracuse area in a redistricted seat.