cooking

Things to keep in mind when grilling this summer

Jun 25, 2016
Tojosan / Flickr

Nothing beats the taste of flame grilled food in the summertime. But there are some things to keep in mind in terms of safety when using the grill.

This week on “Take Care,” food safety expert Benjamin Chapman tells us what we need to know. Chapman is an associate professor and food safety extension specialist at North Carolina State University. He's also the co-host of the podcast “Food Safety Talk.”

Leah Landry / WRVO

Over the last several decades, microwave ovens have become a standard kitchen appliance in many American homes. But for some, doubts remain about their safety and impact on the nutritional value of food cooked in them.

This week on “Take Care,” food scientist Don Schaffner takes us behind the microwave door to explain how microwave ovens work, and the ways this kind of cooking technology interacts with food. Schaffner is an extension specialist in food science and distinguished professor at Rutgers University. He is a world-renowned expert on food safety and protection and is the co-host of a podcast on microbial food safety.

The health benefits of coconut oil and when to use it

Feb 20, 2016
Phu Thinh Co / Flickr

Cooking trends come and go as new information is constantly developing on the healthiest types of foods to cook with. But the most current one was not expected, having once been called “the devil himself in liquid form” by The New York Times.

This week on “Take Care,” Megan Ware, registered dietician, nutritionist and writer for Medical News Today and Livestrong.com, explains the health benefits of the new cooking trend: coconut oil.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

A new food co-op on Syracuse's southside has opened its doors. Neighbors are welcoming the new Eat to Live Food Cooperative on South Salina Street, an area that doesn't have many options when it comes to buying healthy food.  

Joseph Bryant, president of the Southside Community Coalition said the co-op ultimately eliminates a food desert.

"Fifty-two percent of the people in this census tract use public transportation or walk. So not having the ability to drive to a grocery store is one thing, so now we can provide midday shopping trips in the neighborhood," Bryant said.