doctor-patient relationship

Hamza Butt / Flickr

Would you admit a mistake if it meant legal action and potentially the end of your career? Doctors are put in a hard spot when it comes to making an error. Mistakes happen, no matter what your profession, but when life is on the line -- how do you come to terms with a bad decision?

Some in the medical community are now training doctors to better make mistakes, to admit to them and to learn from them. Joining us this week to discuss this approach is Dr. Neha Vapiwala. She’s a vice chair of education, radiation oncology and the advisory dean at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Vapiwala wrote an essay on this topic, which appeared in “The Philadelphia Enquirer.”

This week: Talk therapy, allergies and health communications

Apr 21, 2017

Many people with depression, anxiety or other mental health disorders prefer talk therapy to taking medication alone. Upstate psychologist Roger Greenberg says those who receive talk therapy are less likely to relapse.

Greenberg discusses how antidepressant use has soared since the 1990s and how more mental health professionals are needed to meet the demand for services.

Also this week: ear, nose and throat specialist Dr. Haidy Marzouk talks about diagnosing seasonal allergies; and Dr. Maritza Alvarado discusses doctor-patient communications.

Who's who in the exam room

Mar 25, 2017
Spanish Virtually / Flickr

Have you ever gone into a doctor’s appointment and been left wondering who took your blood pressure? Who asked about that prescription? Chances are you’re not alone.

Sometimes it’s difficult to know who’s who in the exam room. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Robert Schmerling, associate physician and clinical chief of rheumatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and associate professor in medicine at Harvard Medical School, talks about this exam room dilemma.

This week: Touch in chemo, pediatric anesthesia, more

Mar 15, 2017

An Upstate nurse practitioner was surprised to learn through her own research that patients undergoing chemotherapy are not necessarily bothered by the constant touching they undergo in treatment.

What matters more, according to a nursing journal article by nurse practitioner Katherine “Kitty” Leonard and College of Nursing professor Melanie Kalman, PhD, is the quality of the caregiver/patient relationship. Whether a caregiver's touch is painful or intrusive is less important than whether the caregiver shows respect and dignity, they explain on this week’s show.

This week: empathy, childhood cancer, holiday hazards

Nov 17, 2016

Establishing empathy for a patient can be tough for doctors under increasing time pressure. Yet empathy -- being able to see the world as the patient does -- can benefit both the patient and the doctor, says Dr. Louise Prince, an emergency physician at Upstate University Hospital.

Thirteen Of Clubs / via Flickr

Living with a chronic disease can feel overwhelming when trying to keep up with treatment. However, some aspects could be improved simply by creating better communication between a patient and their doctor.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Victor Montori talks about his new approach to the doctor-patient relationship, which he calls minimally disruptive medicine. Montori is a part of the knowledge and evaluation research unit at the Mayo Clinic and is the director of community engagement and late stage translational research for the Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science.