electronics

Light from electronic devices may keep you up at night

Mar 1, 2015
Junnn / Flickr

Reading is a common activity before bed. A lot of people like to cuddle up with a book or magazine before they turn in for the night. In the 21st century, cell phones and tablets have been added to that list of materials. Though reading is often meant to help us fall asleep, the light emitted from reading devices can actually keep us awake.

This week on “Take Care,” Lois E. Krahn discusses why it is these light emissions make people toss and turn. Krahn is a psychiatrist and sleep expert at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Madison County

You won’t be able to throw out old computers, televisions or video game consoles in the trash anymore in New York state once a new e-waste law is goes into effect Jan. 1.

This is the final phase of the state’s electronic waste recycling law that’s meant to divert electronics that can harbor dangerous metals from getting into the landfill.  

Andrew Radin, with the Onondaga County Resource Recovery Center, says this is meant to keep dangerous metals out of landfills. But he also notes there is a jobs component to all of this.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

Onondaga County is experimenting this Election Day with electronic poll books. Information gleaned from this experience could change the way New Yorkers sign in to vote in this state.

Right now, when voters go to the polls in New York state, an election worker flips through a big book. A voter then signs in next to their name, before casting their ballot.

Electronic poll books would change that first step, with voters' names stored in a laptop-like device, using a signature pad to sign in.

Locally developed GE prototype goes to Smithsonian

Dec 26, 2012
Randy Wenner

In the 1950s there were no MP3 players. In fact, there was no way to slip your favorite music into your pocket. But that all changed, thanks to a scientific breakthrough that revolutionized development at one of central New York's largest manufacturers. And the result of that development will now be forever remembered at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.

TarynMarie / Flickr

Some central New Yorkers appear to be confused about where to bring their e-waste. E-waste includes items like old computers, televisions and other small electronic devices.

OCRRA wants to remind central New Yorkers that they shouldn't bring those castoffs to the Onondaga County Resource Recovery Agency.