FDA

MTSOFAN / Flickr

Alzheimer’s disease advocates in central New York are joining the national calling for more money to be spent on treatment research and a cure for the disease.

The federal government currently spends half a billion dollars a year on finding a cure for Alzheimer’s and it has left some potential cures without the money to fund trials that lead to FDA approval.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Spent grain will once again be allowed to be used as livestock feed in New York state. Sen. Chuck Schumer says the by product of the brewing process had been used for centuries by farmers to feed livestock, until the federal government got involved.

"All of a sudden the FDA, the Food and Drug Administration, came in and said 'you can’t send this spent grain except under certain conditions.' That hurt our craft brewers, say Empire Brewing and F.X.Matt here in central New York," said Schumer. It hurt our farmers getting this grain. Otherwise they’d have to pay to dispose of it.”

U.S. Department of Agriculture

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) is among those asking the Food and Drug Administration to clarify its guidelines on the use of wooden boards to age artisanal cheeses. He says cheese makers have been using wooden boards or panels to age their cheeses for centuries, and that changing the rules would put American producers at a disadvantage.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Federal food regulators are backing off of proposed changes to what craft brewers can do with the leftover grains from the beer making process.

Craft brewers in New York have said the proposal would hurt their businesses.

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) had called for the Food and Drug Administration to abandon the change. He announced Thursday FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg agreed to revise the rule to avoid "unintended consequences" that would harm brewers and farmers.

Brewers provide spent grain to dairy farmers as a low-cost or free source of cow feed.

What's the future for the nutrition facts label?

Mar 23, 2014
Dan Domme / Flickr

The Food and Drug Administration is changing the nutrition facts label for the first time since the 1990s. The changes will update the current labels, which have serving sizes that seem too small to many Americans and no prominence placed on the calories.

This week on Take Care, Tracy Fox, president of Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants in Washington D.C., discusses the current nutrition facts label and how it may be upgraded.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Tracy Fox.

Nutrition facts label will be changing

Mar 21, 2014

The familiar nutrition label you see on every food and drink you buy will be changing. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Tracy Fox, president of Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants in Washington D.C.  Fox discusses the current nutrition label and what changes might be coming.

Lorraine Rapp: I wondered if you would talk about how effective these labels have been in helping consumers make more informed decisions? Overall has the program been effective?

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer is hoping to use his influence to expedite delivery of a sterilization product used by hospitals. The senator was called by central New York hospitals to help deal with the shortage of the material used to sterilize equipment used in surgery.

Some rights reserved by Arlington County

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has started a review of the safety and effectiveness of antibacterial products across a range of industries.

The first stage of the process will focus on antibacterial soaps and body washes. Despite some heavy marketing, FDA officials say very little is known about the long-term effects of these products.

In December, the administration gave manufacturers a year to prove their antibacterial soaps and washes are safe for long term daily use, and are more effective than regular soap and water in preventing illness.

Corning Inc Gorilla Glass

Upstate glass manufacturer Corning Inc. has developed the first antimicrobial glass for our proliferating smart devices, lap tops, and TVs. The glass is more resistant to bacteria but, doubts are emerging about the benefits of antibacterial products.

Clinical trials: How drugs get from R&D to your pharmacy

Jan 12, 2014
e-MagineArt.com / Flickr

It takes years for the medication you find in your neighborhood pharmacy to go through research and development. But it takes something more than that for those drugs to make it to your medicine cabinet – clinical trials and people willing to participate in them.

This week on "Take Care," Dr. Lindsay McNair, chief clinical research officer for WIRB-Copernicus Group, a leading independent institutional review board which provides human research protections and ethical research support in the field of drug development, describes how clinical trials work, who participates in them, and why.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. McNair.

Proposed FDA rules for produce farms to be changed

Jan 1, 2014

The Food and Drug Administration is, for the first time, proposing new food safety rules for produce farmers across the country. The FDA asked for comments on the rules this year and thousands of upstate farmers responded. Many of them criticized the rules, saying they could spoil their livelihood. So the FDA announced last week they would re-draft some of the contentious rules.

Richard Ball runs Scoharie Farms on Route 30 outside of Albany. He walks over to a metal gate closing in one of his fields and yanks up the hood on his coat, blocking the wind.

Lindsay Fox / Flickr

The Food and Drug Administration may soon get in on the fast growing e-cigarette industry. It’s considering labeling them as tobacco products, which would mean regulation over where they’re sold and how they’re made. That's good news for central New York smoking opponents, who say a lack of regulation is one of the big danger points of these electronic smoking devices.

So what is an e-cigarette anyway?

“A vaporized form of nicotine that is derived from tobacco, that is flavored and inhaled like a cigarette,” says Upstate Cancer Center Medical Director Leslie Kohman.

Felix E. Guerrero / Flickr

1998 brought about many things: the invention of Google, the Monica Lewinsky scandal, the Winter Olympic Games in Japan and the film Armageddon. While these events took the world by storm, one little blue pill also made its way on to the scene, and has changed how Americans view sex in the 15 years since.

This week on Take Care, sociologist Meika Loe discusses the history and the effects of the drug Viagra. Loe is an associate professor of sociology and women’s studies at Colgate University in Hamilton, N.Y., and the author of the book The Rise of Viagra: How the Little Blue Pill Changed Sex in America.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Meika Loe.

100% Natural: What's in a name?

May 12, 2013
foodpolitics.com

When it comes to going to the supermarket, Dr. Marion Nestle wants you to keep one thing in mind:

“The purpose of the entire layout of the supermarket is to sell food products. There’s a sales pitch with every single product, every single layout.”

This week, “Take Care” interviews Nestle, a professor in nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University. She is the author of many books on the topic of food labeling, including Food Politics, which is currently celebrating its 10th anniversary of publication.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Marion Nestle.

The importance of food labels

May 10, 2013

As more Americans try to eat healthier, consumers are trying to find out more information about the food they purchase at the grocery store. And that means reading the labels. But terms like "organic" and "all natural" can be confusing. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness program "Take Care," recently spoke to NYU professor of sociology and nutrition, Dr. Marion Nestle about how the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates food labels and how consumers have demanded changes in those rules.