Harvard

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Of all the factors that influence our well-being, our environment itself is one often overlooked. We consider exercise and nutrition, sleep and stress -- but new research suggests that an optimal, “green” environment may be more influential than previously understood, increasing both productivity and overall health in the workplace and beyond.

To learn more about the latest in green environments, “Take Care” was joined by Piers MacNaughton, associate director of the Healthy Buildings Program at the Harvard Center for Health and Global Environment. MacNaughton recently managed a study on environmental influences in the hopes of determining what an “optimal built environment” looks like.

Green buildings, better workers?

May 12, 2017
Joh739 / Flickr

Companies are always looking for ways to make their employees more productive. Now, a new study shows that making buildings more environmentally friendly, or “green,” can make them healthier for the workers inside -- and improves those workers' cognitive functions. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Piers MacNaughton, an associate director of the Healthy Buildings Program at the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment. Dr. MacNaughton was the project manager for the study.

Michael Mandiberg / Flickr

Depending on how much we get, sleep can either be our best friend or our worst enemy. A good night’s sleep can make us feel refreshed and rejuvenated, while a bad night’s sleep can leave us feeling moody and groggy. So exactly how much rest is needed to call it a good night’s sleep?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Orfeu Buxton discusses sleep deprivation. Buxton is assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, associate neuroscientist in the Division of Sleep Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and associate professor at Pennsylvania State University. He participated in a recent Q&A on sleep featured in the New York Times.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Buxton.