Health

10:07am

Fri March 14, 2014
Health

This week: how lubricants affect fertility

Kazim Chohan, PhD
Credit Upstate University Hospital

Couples trying to conceive may be surprised to learn that many sexual lubricants act as spermicides, reducing their changes of pregnancy.

Several commercial products and household oils are harmful to sperm and can slow the movement of sperm, according to a study conducted through the andrology laboratory at Upstate Medical University. We'll discuss the study and it's implications with the director of andrology services, Kazim Chohan, and Dr. Renee Mestad.

Then, Dr. Antonia Culebras explains how to reduce stroke risk for people with irregular heartbeats.

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5:38am

Fri March 14, 2014
Health

Myths about water consumption debunked

Some rights reserved by BaronBrian

There are many theories about water consumption: but are they true? Is carbonated water as healthy as still water? Should you drink more fluids when you have a cold ? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen,  speak with Dr. Stanley Goldfarb,  professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.  Goldfarb debunks some of the myths about drinking water in part two of his interview.

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6:10am

Tue March 11, 2014
Health

Cortland County counts down the days to the next Obamacare deadline

Advocates announce "Countdown to Coverage" campaign.
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Cortland County has started a "Countdown to Coverage," to try and get the word out about the next major deadline for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act.

According to Lindy Glennon of the Cortland County Community Action Program, the next important date in the Affordable Care Act timeline is March 31, which is a little over three weeks away. March 31 is the last day to enroll in health coverage through the New York State of Health marketplace, without facing penalties.

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5:08pm

Mon March 10, 2014
Health

Governor proposes offering low-cost 'basic health care plan"

People who are finding it difficult to pay for a health insurance policy offered through New York sate’s health care exchanges, may find a more affordable plan, if a proposal in Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s budget goes through.

The governor’s proposed spending plan would allow New York to offer what’s called a "basic health care plan," according to Mary Clark, regional director of Citizen Action League of New York.

“That would really opens the doors to provide coverage at extremely low cost to families at 200 percent of poverty,” she said.

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7:01pm

Sun March 9, 2014
Health

Colonoscopy important for early cancer detection

Human colon cancer cells.
wellcome images via Flickr

Colonoscopies easily fall under a category of medical tests that are important to have done, but are not easy to discuss. Colonoscopies have an uncomfortable stigma, despite the fact that most patients report not having a troublesome experience with them.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Rajeev Jain discusses the importance of colonoscopies.  Dr. Jain is a partner at Texas Digestive Disease Consultants, chief of gastroenterology at Texas Health Dallas and clinical assistant professor of medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Jain.

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7:00pm

Sun March 9, 2014
Health

Throwing cold water on popular theories

darrylh via Flickr

Water, water, everywhere. At least, that's what we've been told.

Health, nutrition, exercise and beauty experts of all kinds have said over the years that we need to consume a certain amount of water per day, that we need to drink water before and after exercise, that drinking lots of water can help you lose weight, that drinking lots of water helps the skin, and the list goes on and on.

But what’s the science behind all these claims?

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Goldfarb.

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5:34am

Fri March 7, 2014
Health

How much water does the body really need?

[cipher] Flickr

Taking a water bottle to the gym or drinking a certain amount of water each day may seem like good choices.  But do they provide health benefits? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Stanley Goldfarb, professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Goldfarb explains what his research has shown about why water is so important to the body but how you may not need as much of it as you think.

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1:14pm

Thu March 6, 2014
Health

This week: getting through menopause, eating for good health and more

Heather Shannon, director of the midwifery program at Upstate University Hospital.
Credit Upstate University Hospital

For a woman in her late 40s to early 60s, just hearing a healthcare provider assure that "you're not alone, and you're not going crazy," can be a source of comfort.

Heather Shannon, director of the midwifery program at Upstate Medical University, says that the end of childbearing years for many women comes with a multitude of symptoms: hot flashes and night sweats, depression or anxiety and mood swings. Also during this time, women may develop problems with their thyroid and/or adrenal glands. It can leave women frustrated.

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7:49am

Wed March 5, 2014
Health

EPA finalizes standards to reduce car emissions

Some rights reserved by Antonio Garcia.

The Environmental Protection Agency finalized its federal emission standards for cars and gasoline Monday, putting them in line with programs already in place in California.

The cleaner fuel and car standards will be rolled out starting in 2017. Once fully in place, the EPA estimates they’ll lower overall pollution levels and help avoid up to 2,000 early deaths per year.

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7:04am

Tue March 4, 2014
Health

Low radiation imaging comes to upstate New York

Golisano Children's Hospital at the University of Rochester Medical Center

Young patients with spinal problems in upstate New York now have local access to imaging technology that substantially decreases their exposure to radiation.

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7:01pm

Sun March 2, 2014
Health

It's in the blood tests

Kenny Holston Flickr

Getting blood work done can tell a patient a lot of things. With thousands of different tests available, it can be the answer that unlocks a certain medical ailment. After a patient gives blood though, where does that blood go and what is done with it? How exactly does drawing blood tell us what is going on with our bodies?

This week on Take Care, Anne Marie Mullin talks about the basics of blood work. Mullin is senior vice president of Laboratory Alliance, a state-licensed lab that provides testing to a 16-county region in central New York. She was trained at the National Institute of Health, and is board certified in transfusion medicine.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Anne Marie Mullin.

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5:00pm

Sun March 2, 2014
Health

DietBet: How social media can lead to weight loss

wader flickr

Some people consider social media a waste of time. But what if social media could be used to motivate positive change in people? What if social media could inspire people to make healthier choices, and even lose weight?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Tricia Leahey discusses DietBet, a social networking website that challenges users to lose weight. Leahey is an assistant professor in research at Brown Medical School and the Miriam Hospital’s Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, and is also part of the DietBetter.com’s advisory team.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Leahey.

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6:14am

Fri February 28, 2014
Health

The basics of blood work

Thirteen of Clubs Flickr

If you're a patient, having your blood drawn for a medical test may be simple for you. But what's done with your blood after it ends up in the tube is probably a big mystery. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Anne Marie Mullin, senior vice president of Laboratory Alliance, a lab that provides testing to a 16-county region in central New York, to find out more about how blood tests really work.

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8:21am

Mon February 24, 2014
Health

Excellus health insurance launches new community campaign

Credit Excellus

Excellus BlueCross BlueShield (BCBS) is launching a new campaign to remind people of the importance of taking prescription medications as directed. In many hospitals, it’s called medication adherence, and it’s an issue that’s becoming a hot topic in the health world today.

BCBS Regional President Arthur Vercillo says statistics show 75 percent of patients don’t take their prescriptions as directed.

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7:01pm

Sun February 23, 2014
Health

Obsessive habits, bizarre thoughts could be OCD symptoms

invisiblemonsters Flickr

Do you know someone who avoids touching door knobs or repeatedly checks to see if the stove is off? Maybe they adjust desk top objects until they are perfectly aligned. This may not be just fussy behavior. Repetitive acts like these could be a result of OCD, obsessive compulsive disorder.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio, talks about obsessive compulsive disorder. Zasio is a clinical psychologist who specializes in treating anxiety disorders at The Anxiety Treatment Center in California. She has been featured on the A&E television series “Hoarders” and is the author of "The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robin Zasio.

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7:00pm

Sun February 23, 2014
Health

Growing plants from seed ensures getting what you paid for

stevendepolo flickr

With vegetables readily available at any grocery store, one may forget that growing them at home is even an option. While growing plants from seed takes more time and effort than just buying them, one expert believes that not only is it worth it, but it’s actually easier to do than people may think.

This week on Take Care, Amy Jeanroy talks about the basics of growing plants from seed. Jeanroy, an expert herb gardener and contributor to About.com, has written many books on the subject, including Canning and Preserving for Dummies, 2nd edition.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Jeanroy.

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9:20am

Fri February 21, 2014
Health

Obsessive compulsive disorder manifests in variety of symptoms

zen Sutherland Flickr

Obsessive compulsive disorder is the most common anxiety disorder. At least five million Americans suffer from this disorder, which gives people obsessive thoughts. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Dr. Robin Zasio, a clinical psychologist who specializes in treating anxiety disorders. Zasio discusses obsessive compulsive disorder, and how its symptoms can affect daily life.

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2:39pm

Thu February 20, 2014
Health

Cathedral Square residents want neighborhood to be smoke free

Sudipto Sarkar Flickr

The Syracuse Common Council’s new health committee used its first meeting to discuss a smoking ban in the city’s Cathedral Square neighborhood.

The Cathedral Square Neighborhood Association has been looking to push out smoking for about three years. Now it sees a possible way to do that with the council’s newly formed health committee. The neighborhood includes the blocks surrounding Columbus Circle in downtown Syracuse.

There are a lot of questions left to be answered, like legality of such a ban and enforcement of it, said councilor Khalid Bey.

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7:01pm

Sun February 16, 2014
Health

Cholesterol: The good, the bad, and the...wine?

wellcome images flickr

Cholesterol. It’s something we need, but becomes a problem when there’s too much of it. It’s a buzzword often thrown around in advertisements for both food and medication, and something people watch out for in their diets. But what is cholesterol, and why can it be a problem?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robert S. Rosenson answers these questions and more. Dr. Rosenson is a professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and is also director of cardio-metabolic disorders at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Rosenson.

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7:00pm

Sun February 16, 2014
Health

Allergy drops could mean looking forward to spring again

Nomadic Lass Flickr

If you've ever used the phrase "a shot in the arm" to describe something as invigorating, you're probably not an allergy sufferer who's had to endure ongoing injections to control symptoms. Shots are not only painful but often inconvenient to schedule into a busy life. Yet that's been the standard course of treatment for many allergy patients for the past hundred years. Recent developments, however, may make shots obsolete for those who suffer from hay fever.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Linda Cox, talks about the new development of allergy drops. Cox is the president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, and an allergist and immunologist from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Cox.

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4:47pm

Sun February 16, 2014
Health

Dr. Sharon Brangman on The Campbell Conversations

Dr. Sharon Brangman

The American population is rapidly aging, and this has enormous implications for our health care system.  Among other challenges, there are fewer workers contributing to Medicare and Medicaid, relative to the population using those programs.  On this week’s edition of the Campbell Conversations, Grant Reeher talks with Geriatric specialist Dr. Sharon Brangman about the trends in aging, the special health care needs of the elderly, and the ways that our medical system does, and does not, respond to them. 

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6:48am

Fri February 14, 2014
Health

ACA deadlines, penalties approaching

There are less than two months left for people to sign on to a health insurance plan and avoid tax penalties for not having insurance in 2014.  

Steve Wood, community health coordinator of the ACR Health Syracuse office, said they are continuing outreach in nine counties in central New York, encouraging people to get help from specially trained navigators who can help with the process.

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5:34am

Fri February 14, 2014
Health

New medicine may ease allergy suffering

For those who suffer from allergies, allergy shots are currently the best way to get symptoms under control. But a new development could change that. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Dr. Linda Cox, the president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Cox discusses allergy drops, which could potentially eliminate allergies for the user.

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7:07am

Thu February 13, 2014
Health

Possible treatment for Parkinson's developed upstate

Some rights reserved by ZEISS Microscopy

Researchers in upstate New York have developed a new cell therapy that could treat Parkinson’s disease, a neurological disorder which affects motor function. The study from the University of Rochester Medical Center suggests this new approach could not only halt progression of the disease, but also reverse its impact on the brain.

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3:42pm

Tue February 11, 2014
Health

Study finds healthcare providers overlooking costs

A recent study by the Journal of the American Medical Association found that, despite healthcare spending that has reached nearly $3 trillion each year in the U.S., few general medicine programs around the country are teaching new physicians to practice cost-conscious care.

A survey of nearly 300 residency programs around the U.S revealed that the vast majority of healthcare providers believe it’s their responsibility to help decrease rising costs.

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8:25am

Tue February 11, 2014
Health

Stem cell discovery sets science community abuzz

A researcher working at the University of Rochester Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Institute.
Kate O'Connell WXXI

The science community was buzzing this week with news of a breakthrough in stem cell research. Stem cells have the potential to transform into any tissue in the body, and are being explored as treatment options for trauma and degenerative diseases.

When we’re born, our cells are programmed to carry out a specific role. They automatically become muscle cells, skin cells, nerve cells, and that role can’t be changed.

But stem cells can be manipulated to become any kind of cell, offering the potential for regeneration in the body.

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7:01pm

Sun February 9, 2014
Health

Diagnostic imaging: The eye for the inside

Rob! Flickr

Like something straight out of science fiction, the use of diagnostic imaging allows doctors to “see” inside the human body without physically opening it up. X-rays, CT scans, ultrasounds and MRI are some of the most common kinds, but what is the difference between all of them? What situation calls for what kind of diagnostic imaging, and is there any danger in using them?

To answer these basic questions, Dr. Scott Buckingham joins us this week on Take Care. Dr. Buckingham, of CRA Medical Imaging in Syracuse, is board certified in Diagnostic Radiology and has also had training in vascular and interventional radiology.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview Dr. Scott Buckingham.

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7:00pm

Sun February 9, 2014
Health

Poverty not sole indicator of food deserts

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Did you ever realize how the stores in your neighborhood influence what you eat?  If you're on a tight budget and don't own a car, your food choices are limited to items you can buy within walking distance. Fresh fruits and vegetables aren't usually available at the corner convenience store, and if they are, they're expensive. When the nearest full service market is miles away, eating healthy is a challenge. 

This week on Take Care, Dr. Kelly Bower discusses a new study from Johns Hopkins that found racial makeup determines the food access in a neighborhood. Bower is the lead researcher for the study and also an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Kelly Bower.

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6:04pm

Sun February 9, 2014
Health

Cliff Douglas on The Campbell Conversations

Cliff Douglas, left, speaks with Campbell Conversations host Grant Reeher

You sometimes hear that with all we know about the dangerous health effects of cigarettes, you’d have to be crazy to smoke.  That turns out to be more true than we might realize.  In this episode of the Campbell Conversations host Grant Reeher talks with tobacco control policy expert Cliff Douglas, and uncovers a variety of disturbing—and sometimes hopeful—information about our society’s tobacco use, tobacco policies, and the tobacco industry. 

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5:34am

Fri February 7, 2014
Health

Study shows access to food impacted by racial makeup of neighborhood

Poor neighborhoods in urban areas are known as food deserts, where access to grocery stores is limited. This week on WRVO’s health and wellness show Take Care, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Kelly Bower of Johns Hopkins University, who recently led a study that found it isn't just poverty that is an indicator of whether or not supermarkets are readily available in a neighborhood.

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