Health

4:03pm

Mon December 30, 2013
Health

New medical society president says physicians need more say in health care system

Dr. David Halleran is the new president of the Onondaga County Medical Society
Courtesy Onodaga County Medical Society

Health care, and particularly the world of physicians, is changing. The new president of the Onondaga County Medical Society says it’s a result of a business model that ends up limiting how doctors do their jobs.

Dr. David Halleran says over the past couple of decades, the business model of medicine has focused on profits and efficiency. And he believes that has created a more disparate medical community.

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9:07am

Mon December 30, 2013
Health

New prostate cancer diagnostic tool comes to region

Gennady Bratslavasky, head of the urology department at Upstate Medical University shows an ultrasound
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Upstate Medical University has a new tool that can help diagnose one of the most common cancers that strikes men. The hospital is one of the first in the nation to purchase a technology that gives doctors a more targeted approach in finding prostate cancer.

Jeff Barkley, a firefighter from Phoenix, had close family members die from prostate cancer. But even as his PSA level rose over the last several years -- that’s the blood test that is an indicator of prostate cancer -- five biopsies came back negative.

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7:28am

Mon December 23, 2013
Health

Affordable Care Act sign up deadline is today

Navigators have been educating people about what health care coverage plans are available through the New York State of Health. (File photo)
Ellen Abbott WRVO

Today is the deadline for individuals to sign up for health care coverage through the Affordable Care Act in order to get coverage by Jan. 1. So far, New York state’s experience with this groundbreaking change in the way Americans get health care coverage has been generally positive.

Todd Muscatello is a Vice President for Sales at Blue Cross Blue Shield in Syracuse. As someone who deals in the vagaries of health insurance every day, he says he's glad he lives in New York state.  

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6:51am

Mon December 23, 2013
Health

Food pantries strained by federal cuts

A basket of food representing the $36 cut a month that food stamp recipients received beginning in early November.
Karen Dewitt WRVO

With winter officially here, New York’s food pantries and soup kitchens are feeling the strain of feeding the hungry, especially after two key benefit cuts from the federal government.

The FOCUS food pantry, sponsored by six Albany area churches, is located just a block away from the state Capitol.

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5:37am

Mon December 23, 2013
Upstate hospital investigation

'Totalitarian' culture and pay questions at Upstate hospital

SUNY's Upstate Medical University and University Hospital are Syracuse's largest employer. Two top administrators have stepped down in recent weeks over compensation questions.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

In early November, Dr. David Smith resigned as president of the State University’s Upstate Medical University and University Hospital. Days before, the Times Union in Albany had reported Smith was close to leaving Syracuse’s biggest hospital to become president of Penn State University.

Instead, he’s found himself the subject of several investigations.

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7:01pm

Sun December 22, 2013
Health

Why is the U.S. facing a physician shortage?

Mercy Health Flickr

As current physicians get older, a recent trend shows that there aren’t enough potential physicians to replace them. Some projections say that by the end of the decade, there will be a shortfall of 90,000 doctors, causing what many are calling a doctor shortage. What happens when there aren’t enough around?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Atul Grover discusses the causes of the nation’s doctor shortage. Dr. Grover is chief public policy officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges. Trained as a general internist, Dr. Grover now holds faculty appointments at the George Washington University School of Medicine, and the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Grover.

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7:00pm

Sun December 22, 2013
Health

How female friendships improve health after 50

Flavia Aste Flickr

Ask women to name the relationships that make their lives meaningful, and female friendships will likely rank high on the list. But having good friends means a great deal more than fun times and girls’ nights out. As women age, their friendships with other women may offer significant health benefits. Recent studies indicate that women can change one another's brain chemistry for the better.

This week on Take Care, Suzanne Braun Levine discusses what makes female friendships so important, especially for older women. Levine is a writer, editor and nationally recognized authority on women and family issues and media. The first editor of Ms. magazine, she was also the first woman editor of the Columbia Journalism Review. Her e-book, "You Gotta Have Girlfriends: A Post-Fifty Posse is Good For Your Health," is the fourth installment in her series, which examines women in “second adulthood.”

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Suzanne Braun Levine.

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5:34am

Fri December 20, 2013
Health

Experts say a doctor shortage is on the way

Many experts believe the United States is facing a doctor shortage in the not-too-distant future. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Atul Grover, the chief public policy officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges about why there may not be enough physicians and what could be done about it.

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7:58am

Thu December 19, 2013
Health

Fracking chemicals can disrupt hormones

File photo
Bosc d'Anjou Flickr

Chemicals used in the process of hydraulic fracturing can disrupt the body’s normal hormone function according to new research published recently in the Journal of Endocrinology.

The study looked at Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) involved in drilling. Results showed that hormone disrupting activity was higher in water samples taken from drill sites where spills had occurred, compared to sites where little or no drilling had occurred.  

At certain levels of exposure, EDCs have been associated with cancer and infertility in adults.

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7:29am

Thu December 19, 2013
Health

ACR Health rallies to register people into state healthcare exchange

As the deadline for health insurance plan applications approaches, one agency that’s offering individuals help with the process is finding itself very busy. ACR Health in Syracuse has exceeded expectations as far as signing people up in the state healthcare exchanges.

According to navigator Brian Vanbenschoten, ACR has already helped more than 1,100 people sign up for health insurance plans that will go into effect Jan. 1. That’s 300 more than the agency anticipated at this time.

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8:19am

Wed December 18, 2013
Health

Health insurance enrollment deadline looms

There are only five days left for individuals to enroll in new health insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act, if they want that coverage to begin Jan. 1. But central New York insurers are urging people to avoid waiting until the last minute.

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7:28am

Wed December 18, 2013
Health

Dangerous toys list released for holiday season

NYPRIG demonstrates some of the dangers of small pieces and parts of popular toys.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

The New York Public Information Research Group wants to remind shoppers to take safety into consideration when buying toys this holiday season. The group has released it’s 2013 list of dangerous and toxic toys that can be found on store shelves across New York state.

You can buy the cute Littlest Pet Shop toys in stores across central New York. But beware, the cute little seals and dolphins can be dangerous.

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7:01pm

Sun December 15, 2013
Health

What's the secret to getting a good night's sleep?

Samantha Marx Flickr

How long is too long to take a nap? How can I tell if I have sleep apnea or not? What exactly is the secret to getting a good night’s sleep? If you’ve found yourself asking any of these questions before, you’re not alone. Good sleep is something we all want and need, but something we may not know how to achieve.

This week on Take Care, in part two of our interview, Dr. Orfeu Buxton answers common questions about sleep. Buxton is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, and neuroscientist in the Division of Sleep Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Orfeu Buxton.

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7:00pm

Sun December 15, 2013
Health

Hip hip hooray! One of the most common joint replacement procedures greatly improved

Don't give up tennis just yet, joint replacement surgery could keep you moving well into old age.
Ebb and Flow Photography Flickr

In the past, hip replacement surgeries were generally reserved for elderly people. Long recovery times and expensive materials sometimes deterred people from getting the procedure. But, as minimally invasive techniques and materials have improved in recent years, the population of people getting hip replacements has changed as a result.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Seth Greenky discusses the current state of hip replacement surgeries. An associate professor in orthopedics at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, NY, Dr. Greenky also co-directs the Joint Replacement Program at St. Joseph’s Hospital, also in Syracuse.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Greenky.

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4:45pm

Fri December 13, 2013
Health

Federal funding for ambulance services at risk

Ambulance services throughout New York state are at risk of losing millions of dollars in federal reimbursements as a plan is set to expire without congressional action.

Ambulances get paid by Medicaid and Medicare less than it costs to respond to emergencies from patients on those insurance plans, but one-year programs by Congress have boosted those rates. The Senate Finance Committee has approved a longer-term extension on reimbursements. Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., says he wants a five-year guarantee.

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7:57am

Fri December 13, 2013
Health

Human-on-a-chip

Researchers at the ECBC look at results from human-on-a-chip testing.
ECBC

In a handful of labs around the U.S., researchers are creating human tissue from stem cells and manipulating them to replicate the functions of human organs, all on platforms about the size of a thumb drive. This research platform is known as a "human-on-a-chip," and it has the potential to change the nature of medical treatment.

Dr. Harry Salem has been involved in his fair share of exciting scientific breakthroughs, including the creation of the breathalyzer, the infant incubator, and Nyquil.

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7:32am

Fri December 13, 2013
Health

Hip replacement advancements help young and old alike

A double hip replacement.
Tim Samoff Flickr

More than 300,000 hip replacements are performed each year, and advancements in the surgery are giving hope to baby boomers who want to continue their active lives. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Seth Greenky, a surgeon and co-director of the Joint Replacement Program at St. Joseph's Hospital about how hip replacements work, whether you're in your 20s or your 90s.

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7:01pm

Sun December 8, 2013
Health

Get some shuteye: why a good night's sleep is important to your health

Michael Mandiberg Flickr

Depending on how much we get, sleep can either be our best friend or our worst enemy. A good night’s sleep can make us feel refreshed and rejuvenated, while a bad night’s sleep can leave us feeling moody and groggy. So exactly how much rest is needed to call it a good night’s sleep?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Orfeu Buxton discusses sleep deprivation. Buxton is assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, associate neuroscientist in the Division of Sleep Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and associate professor at Pennsylvania State University. He participated in a recent Q&A on sleep featured in the New York Times.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Buxton.

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7:00pm

Sun December 8, 2013
Health

Does a healthy gut mean a healthy body?

mellowynk Flickr

Emerging research reveals that good digestion and a healthy digestive tract are dependent on beneficial bacteria, also known as probiotics. But you don't have to buy special yogurt to add probiotics to your diet. Fermented foods like sauerkraut and kimchi also aid in digestion and improve your immune system. Once you learn the basics of fermenting, it can be a fun and inexpensive way to preserve food at home and add essential nutrients.

This week on Take Care, Amy Jeanroy explains the benefits of eating fermented foods. Jeanroy is a newspaper editor, food writer and co-author of the book, "Fermenting for Dummies," published earlier this year. She's been making and eating fermented foods for 20 years and shares her love of preparing food at home on her website, TheFarmingWife.com.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Jeanroy.

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7:46am

Fri December 6, 2013
Health

How much sleep is enough?

Tony Alter Flickr

Getting a good night's sleep is easier for some people than others. But research has shown it's essential for everyone. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Orfeu Buxton, a neuroscientist and sleep researcher from Harvard, about the health issues a lack of sleep can cause.

Lorraine Rapp: Can you tell us what role does sleep play in our overall health?

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4:06pm

Mon December 2, 2013
Health

Flu shots may be good for your heart

Some rights reserved by Samantha Celera

Getting your flu shot this year may do more than just protect you from a runny nose and sore throat. A study published earlier this year in the Journal for the American Medical Association suggests that flu vaccinations may reduce the risk of heart disease.

Dr. Charlie Lowenstein is the chief of cardiology at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) in western New York. He says no one really knows why the flu can be bad for your heart, but there are some strong theories suggesting it can be.

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7:52am

Mon December 2, 2013
Health

Patient alerts system extends scope of care

Credit Kate O'Connell WXXI

Many health care providers don’t know when their patients are admitted or discharged from the hospital or seen by an ambulance crew. That makes it harder to deliver comprehensive care.

To address this issue, the Rochester Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO) has set up a simple alert system that’s aimed at improving quality of care.

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7:54am

Thu November 28, 2013
Health

Shadow of U.S. polio epidemic likely to be seen for years to come

Richard Daggett in an iron lung at age 13.
Richard Daggett

A recent outbreak of polio in Syria has raised concerns over global effort to eradicate the disease. Although polio hasn’t been seen in the United States for years, the effects of the virus are beginning to reappear in the health care system through a condition known as Post-Polio Syndrome.

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2:25pm

Wed November 27, 2013
Health

Schumer supports St. Joseph's tele-monitoring plan

Sen. Charles Schumer stands with a stethoscope and iPad to illustrate how technology will be part of this program.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer is throwing his weight behind a Syracuse hospital's plan that could ultimately save taxpayers $1 million. Saint Joseph’s Hospital is trying to get a federal grant that will help pay for a system meant to streamline care for Medicare patients.

Probably the most interesting part of the plan is the ability for hospital staff to tele-monitor a patient who’s at home, says Schumer.

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7:01pm

Sun November 24, 2013
Health

Don't be afraid, social anxiety is beatable

Cavale Doom Flickr

We're at that time of year when holiday parties and social activities crowd our social calendar. You may dread the office party and worry about what to wear, but that's a common anxiety many of us face.  But according to the National Institutes of Health, millions of Americans suffer from something much worse -- extreme fear of being scrutinized and judged by others. When the fear is so debilitating it disrupts daily life, it’s social anxiety disorder, a chronic mental health condition also known as social phobia.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio, discusses social anxiety and how to overcome the disorder. Zasio is a nationally-known clinical psychologist who specializes in this field. She's familiar to many from her appearances on the A&E television series “Hoarders.” Zasio is also the author of "The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robin Zasio.

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7:00pm

Sun November 24, 2013
Health

Cross-train your brain to fight cognitive decline

Liz Henry Flickr

Moments of forgetfulness happen to everyone. Whether it’s losing your car keys or not remembering why you opened the refrigerator, it can be frustrating to blank out when trying to remember something. When those moments happen, it’s easy to attribute it to an aging mind. But forgetfulness doesn't have to be a symptom of encroaching old age. In fact, advances in science are enabling us to reclaim lost ground and even prevent loss of memory and function.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Sherry Willis, discusses cognitive function and how older adults can keep their minds sharp. Willis is an adjunct research professor in the department of psychology at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Sherry Willis.

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7:31am

Fri November 22, 2013
Health

State cancer groups ask for more money to promote smoking cessation programs

DucDigital Flickr

Thursday was the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout, an effort begun by anti-cancer groups nearly four decades ago to help people quit smoking. This year the American Cancer Society in New York used the day to call attention to a decline in state spending on anti-smoking programs.

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5:39am

Fri November 22, 2013
Health

Overcoming fear important factor in controlling social anxiety

Millions of Americans suffer from social anxiety disorder, an extreme fear of being judged by others in social situations. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with doctor Robin Zasio, a nationally known clinical psychologist and author about what social anxiety disorder is and how to treat it.

Lorraine Rapp: would you explain the difference between just being shy and actual social anxiety?

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8:25am

Thu November 21, 2013
Health

Should we buy and sell organs?

Some rights reserved by Refracted Moments

It’s illegal to buy and sell organs in the United States, but a new study suggests paying people to donate kidneys could address the chronic shortage of available organs and be more cost effective than the current system.

The idea immediately raises the question; is there a way to buy and sell organs ethically?

In upstate New York alone there are more than 1,300 patients on the waitlist for a donated kidney. Some have been on that list for more than four years.

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8:59am

Mon November 18, 2013
Health

Lack of lung cancer advocacy hinders research dollars, improvements

Aidan Jones Flickr

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, but chances are you might not know that. Lung cancer just doesn’t get some of the same attention as other types of cancer, and that ultimately leads to more deaths.

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