Health

7:29am

Thu December 19, 2013
Health

ACR Health rallies to register people into state healthcare exchange

As the deadline for health insurance plan applications approaches, one agency that’s offering individuals help with the process is finding itself very busy. ACR Health in Syracuse has exceeded expectations as far as signing people up in the state healthcare exchanges.

According to navigator Brian Vanbenschoten, ACR has already helped more than 1,100 people sign up for health insurance plans that will go into effect Jan. 1. That’s 300 more than the agency anticipated at this time.

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8:19am

Wed December 18, 2013
Health

Health insurance enrollment deadline looms

There are only five days left for individuals to enroll in new health insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act, if they want that coverage to begin Jan. 1. But central New York insurers are urging people to avoid waiting until the last minute.

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7:28am

Wed December 18, 2013
Health

Dangerous toys list released for holiday season

NYPRIG demonstrates some of the dangers of small pieces and parts of popular toys.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

The New York Public Information Research Group wants to remind shoppers to take safety into consideration when buying toys this holiday season. The group has released it’s 2013 list of dangerous and toxic toys that can be found on store shelves across New York state.

You can buy the cute Littlest Pet Shop toys in stores across central New York. But beware, the cute little seals and dolphins can be dangerous.

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7:01pm

Sun December 15, 2013
Health

What's the secret to getting a good night's sleep?

Samantha Marx Flickr

How long is too long to take a nap? How can I tell if I have sleep apnea or not? What exactly is the secret to getting a good night’s sleep? If you’ve found yourself asking any of these questions before, you’re not alone. Good sleep is something we all want and need, but something we may not know how to achieve.

This week on Take Care, in part two of our interview, Dr. Orfeu Buxton answers common questions about sleep. Buxton is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, and neuroscientist in the Division of Sleep Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Orfeu Buxton.

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7:00pm

Sun December 15, 2013
Health

Hip hip hooray! One of the most common joint replacement procedures greatly improved

Don't give up tennis just yet, joint replacement surgery could keep you moving well into old age.
Ebb and Flow Photography Flickr

In the past, hip replacement surgeries were generally reserved for elderly people. Long recovery times and expensive materials sometimes deterred people from getting the procedure. But, as minimally invasive techniques and materials have improved in recent years, the population of people getting hip replacements has changed as a result.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Seth Greenky discusses the current state of hip replacement surgeries. An associate professor in orthopedics at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, NY, Dr. Greenky also co-directs the Joint Replacement Program at St. Joseph’s Hospital, also in Syracuse.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Greenky.

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4:45pm

Fri December 13, 2013
Health

Federal funding for ambulance services at risk

Ambulance services throughout New York state are at risk of losing millions of dollars in federal reimbursements as a plan is set to expire without congressional action.

Ambulances get paid by Medicaid and Medicare less than it costs to respond to emergencies from patients on those insurance plans, but one-year programs by Congress have boosted those rates. The Senate Finance Committee has approved a longer-term extension on reimbursements. Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., says he wants a five-year guarantee.

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7:57am

Fri December 13, 2013
Health

Human-on-a-chip

Researchers at the ECBC look at results from human-on-a-chip testing.
ECBC

In a handful of labs around the U.S., researchers are creating human tissue from stem cells and manipulating them to replicate the functions of human organs, all on platforms about the size of a thumb drive. This research platform is known as a "human-on-a-chip," and it has the potential to change the nature of medical treatment.

Dr. Harry Salem has been involved in his fair share of exciting scientific breakthroughs, including the creation of the breathalyzer, the infant incubator, and Nyquil.

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7:32am

Fri December 13, 2013
Health

Hip replacement advancements help young and old alike

A double hip replacement.
Tim Samoff Flickr

More than 300,000 hip replacements are performed each year, and advancements in the surgery are giving hope to baby boomers who want to continue their active lives. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Seth Greenky, a surgeon and co-director of the Joint Replacement Program at St. Joseph's Hospital about how hip replacements work, whether you're in your 20s or your 90s.

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7:01pm

Sun December 8, 2013
Health

Get some shuteye: why a good night's sleep is important to your health

Michael Mandiberg Flickr

Depending on how much we get, sleep can either be our best friend or our worst enemy. A good night’s sleep can make us feel refreshed and rejuvenated, while a bad night’s sleep can leave us feeling moody and groggy. So exactly how much rest is needed to call it a good night’s sleep?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Orfeu Buxton discusses sleep deprivation. Buxton is assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, associate neuroscientist in the Division of Sleep Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and associate professor at Pennsylvania State University. He participated in a recent Q&A on sleep featured in the New York Times.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Buxton.

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7:00pm

Sun December 8, 2013
Health

Does a healthy gut mean a healthy body?

mellowynk Flickr

Emerging research reveals that good digestion and a healthy digestive tract are dependent on beneficial bacteria, also known as probiotics. But you don't have to buy special yogurt to add probiotics to your diet. Fermented foods like sauerkraut and kimchi also aid in digestion and improve your immune system. Once you learn the basics of fermenting, it can be a fun and inexpensive way to preserve food at home and add essential nutrients.

This week on Take Care, Amy Jeanroy explains the benefits of eating fermented foods. Jeanroy is a newspaper editor, food writer and co-author of the book, "Fermenting for Dummies," published earlier this year. She's been making and eating fermented foods for 20 years and shares her love of preparing food at home on her website, TheFarmingWife.com.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Jeanroy.

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7:46am

Fri December 6, 2013
Health

How much sleep is enough?

Tony Alter Flickr

Getting a good night's sleep is easier for some people than others. But research has shown it's essential for everyone. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Orfeu Buxton, a neuroscientist and sleep researcher from Harvard, about the health issues a lack of sleep can cause.

Lorraine Rapp: Can you tell us what role does sleep play in our overall health?

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4:06pm

Mon December 2, 2013
Health

Flu shots may be good for your heart

Some rights reserved by Samantha Celera

Getting your flu shot this year may do more than just protect you from a runny nose and sore throat. A study published earlier this year in the Journal for the American Medical Association suggests that flu vaccinations may reduce the risk of heart disease.

Dr. Charlie Lowenstein is the chief of cardiology at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) in western New York. He says no one really knows why the flu can be bad for your heart, but there are some strong theories suggesting it can be.

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7:52am

Mon December 2, 2013
Health

Patient alerts system extends scope of care

Credit Kate O'Connell WXXI

Many health care providers don’t know when their patients are admitted or discharged from the hospital or seen by an ambulance crew. That makes it harder to deliver comprehensive care.

To address this issue, the Rochester Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO) has set up a simple alert system that’s aimed at improving quality of care.

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7:54am

Thu November 28, 2013
Health

Shadow of U.S. polio epidemic likely to be seen for years to come

Richard Daggett in an iron lung at age 13.
Richard Daggett

A recent outbreak of polio in Syria has raised concerns over global effort to eradicate the disease. Although polio hasn’t been seen in the United States for years, the effects of the virus are beginning to reappear in the health care system through a condition known as Post-Polio Syndrome.

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2:25pm

Wed November 27, 2013
Health

Schumer supports St. Joseph's tele-monitoring plan

Sen. Charles Schumer stands with a stethoscope and iPad to illustrate how technology will be part of this program.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer is throwing his weight behind a Syracuse hospital's plan that could ultimately save taxpayers $1 million. Saint Joseph’s Hospital is trying to get a federal grant that will help pay for a system meant to streamline care for Medicare patients.

Probably the most interesting part of the plan is the ability for hospital staff to tele-monitor a patient who’s at home, says Schumer.

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7:01pm

Sun November 24, 2013
Health

Don't be afraid, social anxiety is beatable

Cavale Doom Flickr

We're at that time of year when holiday parties and social activities crowd our social calendar. You may dread the office party and worry about what to wear, but that's a common anxiety many of us face.  But according to the National Institutes of Health, millions of Americans suffer from something much worse -- extreme fear of being scrutinized and judged by others. When the fear is so debilitating it disrupts daily life, it’s social anxiety disorder, a chronic mental health condition also known as social phobia.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio, discusses social anxiety and how to overcome the disorder. Zasio is a nationally-known clinical psychologist who specializes in this field. She's familiar to many from her appearances on the A&E television series “Hoarders.” Zasio is also the author of "The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robin Zasio.

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7:00pm

Sun November 24, 2013
Health

Cross-train your brain to fight cognitive decline

Liz Henry Flickr

Moments of forgetfulness happen to everyone. Whether it’s losing your car keys or not remembering why you opened the refrigerator, it can be frustrating to blank out when trying to remember something. When those moments happen, it’s easy to attribute it to an aging mind. But forgetfulness doesn't have to be a symptom of encroaching old age. In fact, advances in science are enabling us to reclaim lost ground and even prevent loss of memory and function.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Sherry Willis, discusses cognitive function and how older adults can keep their minds sharp. Willis is an adjunct research professor in the department of psychology at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Sherry Willis.

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7:31am

Fri November 22, 2013
Health

State cancer groups ask for more money to promote smoking cessation programs

DucDigital Flickr

Thursday was the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout, an effort begun by anti-cancer groups nearly four decades ago to help people quit smoking. This year the American Cancer Society in New York used the day to call attention to a decline in state spending on anti-smoking programs.

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5:39am

Fri November 22, 2013
Health

Overcoming fear important factor in controlling social anxiety

Millions of Americans suffer from social anxiety disorder, an extreme fear of being judged by others in social situations. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with doctor Robin Zasio, a nationally known clinical psychologist and author about what social anxiety disorder is and how to treat it.

Lorraine Rapp: would you explain the difference between just being shy and actual social anxiety?

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8:25am

Thu November 21, 2013
Health

Should we buy and sell organs?

Some rights reserved by Refracted Moments

It’s illegal to buy and sell organs in the United States, but a new study suggests paying people to donate kidneys could address the chronic shortage of available organs and be more cost effective than the current system.

The idea immediately raises the question; is there a way to buy and sell organs ethically?

In upstate New York alone there are more than 1,300 patients on the waitlist for a donated kidney. Some have been on that list for more than four years.

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8:59am

Mon November 18, 2013
Health

Lack of lung cancer advocacy hinders research dollars, improvements

Aidan Jones Flickr

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, but chances are you might not know that. Lung cancer just doesn’t get some of the same attention as other types of cancer, and that ultimately leads to more deaths.

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7:01pm

Sun November 17, 2013
Health

With strokes, "time saved is brain saved"

gwire Flickr

While time is often a major factor in determining how much damage a medical ailment can cause, it is especially true with strokes. Under the right conditions, the reversibility of stroke symptoms can decrease by the minute. But why is the saying “time saved is brain saved” so important when it comes to strokes?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Larry Goldstein, discusses how to recognize a stroke, and why time is of the essence when it comes to treating them. Dr. Goldstein is a professor of neurology at Duke University and director of the Duke Comprehensive Stroke Center in North Carolina.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Goldstein.

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7:00pm

Sun November 17, 2013
Health

Why so SAD?

Marcel Flickr

Winter in central and northern New York isn’t always as picturesque as some may wish it to be. Daylight is usually gone before the work day is over, flurries have the potential to make any drive difficult, and gray skies often seem like they’re never going away. It’s normal to feel off when the days get shorter, but what happens when these feelings manifest into something much more serious on a yearly basis?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Kelly Rohan discusses the causes and treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Rohan is an expert in SAD and acting director of clinical training in the Department of Psychology at the University of Vermont.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Rohan.

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6:09am

Fri November 15, 2013
Health

Time and awareness is key to treating a stroke

Knowing how to recognize the symptoms of stroke can mean the difference between life and death. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, spoke with Dr. Larry Goldstein, professor of neurology and director of Duke University's Stroke Center about what you should do if you suspect a loved one has had a stroke.

Lorraine Rapp: Describe what takes place in the body when a person is having a stroke?

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7:04am

Wed November 13, 2013
Health

Medicare open enrollment deadline approaches

There’s less than a month until the Dec. 7 deadline, when Medicare’s open enrollment period ends.

Blaine Longnecker, a sales consultant out of Syracuse’s Excellus Blue Cross Blue Shield office, said seniors eligible for the federal health insurance program who are looking to change their plan shouldn't bide their time.

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7:01pm

Sun November 10, 2013
Health

Much is still unknown about Parkinson's disease

Circuits of the basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease. Picture shows 2 coronal slices have been superimposed to include the involved basal ganglia.
Credit Mikael Häggström

While Michael J. Fox may best be known for his acting, many know him as one of the leading figures in taking away the stigma against Parkinson’s disease. Fox, along with former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, boxer Muhammad Ali and singer Linda Ronstadt have all been open and frank about their diagnosis of the disease. But as more and more of the public are aware of the disease though, there is still much that is unknown about Parkinson’s disease.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Kelvin Chou discusses the uncertainties involved with Parkinson’s disease, as well as cutting edge ways to treat it. Dr. Chou is associate professor of neurology and neurosurgery at the University of Michigan Medical School, and is one of the country’s leading authorities on Parkinson’s disease. He has recently published a book for patients and families called Deep Brain Stimulation: A New Life for People with Parkinson’s, Dystonia and Essential Tremor.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Chou.

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7:00pm

Sun November 10, 2013
Health

What should men do when they have 'Low T?'

Credit DEA.gov

You’ve seen the advertisements. A middle-aged man appears to be depressed and withdrawn from his family, and his interest in sexual activity is at an all-time low. What’s wrong with him? He’s been suffering from low testosterone levels, and all of his problems can be solved with a simple supplement. The frequency of ads for testosterone supplements have increased recently, and with it, questions about how legitimate testosterone replacement therapy is.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Martin Miner discusses the facts and myths of the condition known as “low T,” or reduced levels of testosterone in men. Dr. Miner is the co-director of the Men’s Health Center and chief of Family Practice and Community Medicine at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island. He’s also clinical associate professor of family medicine and urology at Brown University Medical School.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Miner.

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7:50am

Fri November 8, 2013
Health

Parkinson's disease: diagnosis and treatment

A PET scan may be used to help diagnose Parkinson's disease.
Liz West Flickr

Parkinson's disease used to be something people didn't like to talk about. But celebrities like Michael J. Fox and Linda Ronstadt, who have been open about having the degenerative nervous disorder, have taken away some of the stigma. There is still much about Parkinson's that even the experts don't understand. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr.

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8:09am

Thu November 7, 2013
Health

Health navigators say Affordable Care Act sign-ups have been successful

There may be problems in other states for people signing up for health care under the Affordable Care Act, but things are moving smoothly in New York state, according to one organization in the midst of it. ACR Health in Syracuse says it has nothing but success stories.

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7:01pm

Sun November 3, 2013
Health

Hepatitis C -- the "silent epidemic"

Hepatitis virions.
Microbe World Flickr

The “baby boomer” generation – Americans born between 1945 and 1965, has had a big impact on American society and culture. Now a disease is having a big effect on them. Baby boomers are five times more likely to have contracted Hepatitis C than the rest of the population. With symptoms that may not appear for decades, most may not even know they have Hepatitis C until it is too late.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Bryce D. Smith explains why all baby boomers should be tested for Hepatitis C. Dr. Smith is a lead health scientist in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Viral Hepatitis, and is the primary author of recent Hepatitis C testing recommendations that are aimed at members of the baby boomer generation.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Smith.

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